New answers tagged

3

I'm very familiar with the European alps, but not at all familiar with the sacred mountains in China. So I can only address why stairs are rare in the alps: You mentioned hiking up the sacred mountains. The peak isn't that important in the Alps, so paths rarely take the shortest route to the peak. Instead you have a whole network of paths that link various ...


0

According to physics, Work = Force X Distance. Therefore, the same amount of work is done to ascend a mountain by stair or by inclined path. What you will find is that with a stair, the distance is shorter and the work is greater; and with a path, the distance is greater, but the force is less. And if you consider the same speed (distance/time), it will ...


1

I would say just based on the photos (and I realize they are just examples) that whether or not you build stairs or switchbacks would depend entirely on the landscape, the composition of the mountain, and surrounding vegetation. If I were to try to plan a path to the top of the mountain, I would look at what I had to work with. If I had the real estate to ...


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Money. The average wage in central Europe is five times that of rural China. Which does not mean that the alpine states do not invest quite a lot into maintaining hiking paths. In Europe it's just more efficient to use methods which are less labor-intense and more machine-intense. When you build stairs up a mountain terrain, you need to invest quite a ...


6

I have another possible explanation that I cannot corraborate with online sources at this time. I visited Japan several years ago, and as one does (and should definitely do), I visited many Buddhist temples and Shinto shrines while there. I believe it was a Buddhist temple (as opposed to a shrine) where I first noticed two sets of stairs. There was a ...


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Based on pure speculation, I would think it is much less overall work to cut stairs into a suitable mountain, rather than create a terraced road using switchbacks. I mean, imagine you, alone, are responsible for creating a path to the top and you only have a hammer and chisel...


8

European point of view: Back in the times (or what I was told many years ago by some locals) is that they would let a donkey lead the group to find the path of least resistance. The natural instincts of the animal would find the best path for climbing (wonder what IQ is required ... as opposed to humans :) Considering they used the mules and such for loads/...


28

To add to the other answers, some paths my be susceptible to soil erosion - from foot traffic and rainfall. This eventually makes some sections almost impassable for some people, as well as damaging the terrain and surrounding vegetation. I have seen this first hand in Hong Kong. For example: So in many places, steps are built. In HK these were ...


40

Stairs are easier to walk than rocky paths. In ancient times they allowed royalty more leisurely access to sacred mountains symbolizing their high rank in society, while commoners were likely restricted to walking older foot paths (if they were even allowed on top). Today all 'pilgrims' are afforded the ease of stairs. In Europe a lot of mountain top ...


13

When many people climb the same path every day, natural rocks become smooth, slippery and dangerous. An example in Europe is the path to Château de Montségur in the french Pyrenees. Stairs are less prone to such wear over time.


1

Mirrors are a very important aspect of driving, and if not set correctly navigating certain areas will become increasingly difficult. Set your mirrors to see your blind spots. A good way to start is to take your rear view mirror, and adjust the side mirrors so that for their relative side their visibility is barely touching the visibility of that side on ...


3

If there is traffic in the outer lane, I am stuck and I cannot exit. I can also not stop safely. Should I keep driving in circles in the inner lane until there is space to exit to the outer lane? In some countries, this is exactly what must be done. You must continue to make circles on the inner lane, until you can safely change it. You must be driving on ...


8

In Australia the basics are: Give way to any traffic on the roundabout (REG 114) Drive off the lefthand side of the central island (REG 115) Follow the traffic lane arrows (REG 116) When entering the roundabout indicate Left if you are travelling less then half way round. (REG 112) Right if you are travelling more then half way round. (REG 113) When ...


5

In Spain, rules are: You leave the roundabout always from the outer lane. Traffic outside the roundabout gives way to traffic inside the roundabout. Traffic changing lanes gives way to traffic in those lanes. See Guardia Civil* tweet here: https://twitter.com/guardiacivil/status/752190404221669376 (*) Police force in charge of road traffic in Spain, ...


4

In the Netherlands you should always aim to take the right lane unless you are going left or a full round. It is not allowed to enter the roundabout right next to someone else as this can trouble them getting off. You can enter slightly in front of them or behind them. Exiting from the right lane is straightforward. You start signaling at the moment you ...


13

In the UK (which drives on the left), this is governed by rule 186 of the Highway Code: When taking the first exit to the left, unless signs or markings indicate otherwise signal left and approach in the left-hand lane keep to the left on the roundabout and continue signalling left to leave. When taking an exit to the right or going ...


8

If there is traffic in the outer lane, I am stuck and I cannot exit. This is exactly the issue when the people doesn't obey the rule you should use inner lane for turning left or back. If the do, this won't happen, since people will leave roundabout before you, making place free for you. If there's no such rule (Spain - the example linked by you), simply ...


2

I would not worry too much about it. The holiday you refer to is listed as "Mid-Autumn Day" on Wikivoyage and it is three days, which is not enough for major travels and I have not personally experienced anything crazy going on in Shanghai during that time, Beijing is likely similar. If you do want to travel out of Beijing on those days, you might still ...


3

Qualifier: I live in Japan and have used those ATMs thousands of times. ATMs at banks here (usually not the ones at convenience stores) accept cash deposits. And by cash I don't mean you put the money in an envelope and tell the machine how much is there, I mean you put the money into the tray and the machine counts it and tells YOU how much is there. Yes, ...


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The best source I can find is this picture gallery of the local newspaper (Süddeutsche Zeitung, in German). My advice is based on that, own experience and other sources where mentioned: You can bring your own food. (Within some limits, see below. Unless it is a "Wirtsgarten".) In case you bring food, you might want to think of napkins, cutlery, tablecloth, ...


2

Agree with what Sundeep says. Here is my 10 cents to it. Normal Hi Across the world, people say hi by raising their hands with palm facing you. This is mostly between acquaintances and friends. So no respect factor is involved in this. It is more of a friendly gesture. Namsthe Formal and traditional Indian way of welcoming somebody to a new place, ...


10

T-shirt and jeans or shorts are absolutely OK for just sightseeing (of course as long as weather permits and as long as you don't have any really strange image on your T-shirt). It might be not OK for theaters, high-end restaurants, etc, where a more formal dress is expected. Churches also often have a more strict dress-code. Usually it is long trousers (...


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Trabocchi ... Trabocchi Everywhere The Costa dei Trabocchi is a piece of coastline in Abruzzo, spanning Ortona to Fossacesia: Map shamelessly screenshot from GAC Costa dei Trabocchi since the map link isn't available To date, you'll find several trabocchi along the coast, around 31. Most of these used to be abandoned. However, in 1994 the Region passed a ...


22

Well...it has no meaning as "dress code", it simply looks wrong. Here a picture of actual "diandlgwand" (girl clothes) with different cuts of colors: and here the short form: All clothes have one-piece (!) skirts which at least reaches the knee, very often combined with a apron. Your wife skirt is too short and it is not one piece: it shows a second ...


10

Does the gesture he made look similar to the one in the photo below, but without the other hand raised and the mouth open? If yes, then it is sort of an informal Namasthe practiced among the town folk and some city folk who migrated from the towns or villages. It is polite and indicates that the person doing it is humble. You will rarely find a man of ...


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There is no meaning in the ‘dress code’ of your picture — simply because there is no dress code involved. Your wife attempted to look like the locals — wearing a Dirndl — but failed absolutely miserably at it. Traditional Dirndl are ankle-long, come with an apron and don’t show the underdress. The underdress (clearly visible in your picture) is essentially ...


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I guess that I've found the answer of my question, the catch of this dress is the "bow": *Dirndl apron bow in the middle Tying the bow of sexy dirndl dresses this way can attract a lot of incredulous looks, especially when the wearers themselves don't know its meaning. Different from what you might think (left-free, right-taken, middle-unsure?), these ...


11

I'm not sure I completely understand the question, but if it is "Why has this dress been met with surprise at the Oktoberfest in Munich, I see two points: Comparing to pictures of random dirndls the white underskirt strikes me as very long and visible, it is typically not or barely visible/there. Also the typical apron is missing. See Wikipedia on ...


12

You are probably witnessing the adaab hand gesture. This is a secular greeting used in India, Pakistan and other countries where Urdu is spoken. Here are two people demonstrating the gesture. The lady is doing the namaste and the man is responding with the adaab (credit: aaghazedosti.wordpress.com): The hand is raised higher to the face in a more formal ...


13

The greeting which you included is the "Namaste" (you are right!). This is a very formal greeting, which is shown towards guests and elders. The greeting which you haven't included, looks more like a vertical salute. [Couldn't find a picture. Maybe, I'd include one of my guard if I can click it.] It is more like an informal namaste(and conveys the same ...


0

Consider using a foot stool when you are on the toilet to keep your feet elevated. The result should be kind of like this. It doesn't put your weight on your knees but puts your body in the more familiar position. Of course, you could also consider getting one of these: https://www.amazon.ca/Squatty-Potty-Original-Bathroom-Toilet/dp/B007BISCT0



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