New answers tagged

6

My first guess was the Nollendorfplatz area in Berlin but the second is Le Marais in Paris: Le Marais has "an emphasis on 'commercialism, gay pride and coming-out of the closet'" And if you would consider North America, I live very close to Davie Village in Vancouver. I do not think there's any gender identity or expression that would draw even a ...


0

I would say that some cultures are more emotional and playful to the event of something that could go wrong and this is a way to cope/reliefing with that back of the head stress. Less travel time leads to more excitement. This wears down once flying becomes more frequent in life and you become experienced with its procedures. But once in awhile, why not cope ...


2

That's right. Many of websites have explain Iran dress code for women since the rules for men isn’t as strict as the men . generally, men can wear T-shirts but you can't wear shorts in public. But for sport activities such as cycling or running, you can wear


8

The accepted answer and the supporting answers are all good, but me living in a country neighboring Romania, and having too many flights between the UK and my country, the explanation is much simpler. We're generally poor. We don't get to fly that often, half these flights are filled with older relatives visiting their migrant children. So a flight is ...


8

Israelis do this. In Israel, it is very common for people to clap their hands and applaud after landing, especially when flying with the national airline El Al. While it might sound silly - a lot of Israelis are very proud of the fact they do in fact have a nice airline with good pilots. Add that to the fact that pilots in El-Al often have ex-airforce ...


3

From my experience in the United States it is more a tradition with specific airlines to help stand out from the crowd to say thank you and express gratitude for the pilot after a good landing, or any landing at all. Specifically in the US Southwest airlines do this, along with many other things including jokes from the flight staff to stand out from other ...


3

Years ago, there were a series of dc-10 crashes. In my experience, passengers started applauding safe landings in that time period -- particularly on dc-10s. It was a bit of gallows humor ... "We made it!"


1

At the risk of making broad over-generalizations, I'd say people are likely to clap on an ordinary landing if they don't trust their (national) culture - as it concerns professionalism, safety, planning ahead, etc. - enough to feel it's reasonable to assume an endeavor such as a plane flight will conclude without some kind of crash, or their cultural ...


11

The answers above are good, but I'd like to add a few things. People have clapped on flights because of: Pilot's last flight/senior crewmember retiring Smooth flight in rough weather Rough landing ("we survived!") Landing ahead of schedule All of these things may be the root cause of the clapping but in many cases most people start clapping because their ...


32

To add to Heidels answer: Humans are herd mammals, psychologically speaking. If you pay attention to such applause, usually it starts slowly with 1 or 2 people clapping, then others joining in until eventually everyone is clapping and cheering. You don't have the entire plane bursting into applause at the exact moment the wheels touch down. Sometimes it ...


91

A cabin crew member here, and I am from a country where people do not clap after landings and I was surprised when this happened for the first time with me, so I started asking passengers when this happens on different flights. Basically there are three main reasons: A sign of appreciation: the smoother the flight/landing, the stronger the clapping. You ...


2

Inner city vs between cities are two different things. The easiest driving is between cities; once you are out of the city center, streets and roads are usually better organized, larger, and straighter. Highway driving is more or less the same; on multi-lane highways, stay on the right side of the road unless passing. Inner city driving, depending on the ...


1

At first, I was surprised by the exit signs on the motorway. Shortly before an exit, you will see two signs, an arrow pointing upward/forward more-or-less above the left lane and an arrow curved to the right more-or-less above the right lane. Following that, there are also markings with a right-pointing arrow and the name of the exit, directly on the road ...


2

This is from personal experience. When driving across country in the south of Italy towards "City A" from "City B". I would see a sign that had "City A" marked on it, but the sign would be constructed such that it looked like an arrow pointing at 90 degrees to the direction of traffic - which implied to my non-italian mind that I should be turning in ...


4

Legally speaking, there's only one legal ID for foreigners in Japan: your passport. (Unless you're a long-term resident of Japan, in which case your zairyu card is also OK, but these aren't available to tourists.) That said, ID checks are pretty rare and in practice you can likely get away with a laminated photocopy of your passport's photo page. Do bear ...


4

Opposite to @jpatokal answer, I'd say that you can do it safely on Iquitos-Perú, where a lot of people often go to do this "ceremonies" and there are a lot of places that offers this service, for example this. The price is around 100$ per person per day (It's a pack that goes from 2 days to 8 days, depending on where you go to do it). For further ...


19

Your best bet would likely be to go to Brazil and join a church ceremony. Ayahuasca is legal there for religious use, and there are several well-established churches that use it regularly with a track record of not killing their members, most notably Santo Daime and União do Vegetal. Church ceremonies (and the effects of ayahuasca) can last up to 12 hours, ...



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