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26

Nowhere in China. American Chinese cuisine (and its relatives in Australia, Europe, etc) is heavily adapted for Western tastes: "Chinese-American cuisine is 'dumbed-down' Chinese food. It’s adapted... to be blander, thicker and sweeter for the American public" Some dishes are localized versions of actual Chinese dishes (eg. Kung Pao chicken, which ...


15

First, your fears are a little overblown. Thai cuisine isn't quite as "freaky" as, say, some parts of China and you're unlikely to eat something exotic by accident. Although not eating any offal at all is going to be a little limiting... why not give it a shot and expand your horizons a bit? At any rate, I'd start with Wikivoyage's description of Thai ...


15

In short, no, there's no Japanese region known for spicy food in the same way that (say) Sichuan or Thailand is. Japanese doesn't really even have a word for "spicy", 辛い karai originally meant "salty" and is still used in that sense as well. However, there are a couple of spicy local specialities, mostly in the south of the country where they had the most ...


14

I was in Southern India earlier this year and noticed many Indians speaking English with each other. This is because they simply don't speak each others native language. I don't think people in the south don't want to speak in Hindi, they simply can't. That's why English is so important, because most people speak better English than any second Indian ...


13

There are three classically, iconically, Chicago dishes, and one newcomer that is heavily associated with the city for serious foodies. Beyond that, as Mark Mayo notes, Chicago is a large, diverse, cosmopolitan city with a very large population of migrants from around the world, so there are any number of best-in-class eateries for a wide variety of cuisines ...


13

Not quite -- the bees are not eaten, but it is possible to eat their larvae (はちのこ/蜂の子 hachinoko, lit. "bee children"). Here's the process of preparation documented in detail (in Japanese, but with pictures). This is by no means a common dish (in fact I'd never heard of it before I started looking into this!), but apparently in the Tono region of Gifu ...


11

The "North vs South" divide exists. South Indians feel North Indians are loud, boorish, and have a superiority complex, and do not attempt to learn or respect local culture, language and such. North Indians feel South Indians are unfriendly, are sambar-rasam people. Both parties have some pre-conceived notions. In the end it depends on you, and the ...


11

EDIT: I realise this actual is rather off-topic, more dealing with places to get various Japanese foods than the food itself. Hopefully still useful. Just to give a bit more specific detail on particular places, and specifically the cheap places... Generally speaking breakfast comes in 2 varieties - Japanese or "Western". I won't go into crazy detail ...


11

I think that is just for aesthetical reasons. There are stores in Dubai that do sell round doughnuts, such as Dunkin Donuts, Krispy Kreme or other stores, the only reference to square doughnuts in Dubai that I could find was the ones at Starbucks. Also on the other hand there are square doughnuts for instance in the US, without any mention to it be for ...


10

I too am like you and hunted out the local foods while I was there. Here are some of my highlights: cuy, or guinea-pig in English, tends to be found in the mountainous areas. I was told to have it in Cusco, and did, but am a bit sceptical as it was rather expensive there, and really didn't taste great. Most backpackers agreed it was an acquired taste, ...


9

As you've already found out, laksa is not a single dish, but a constellation of them -- there's something like a dozen major varieties in Malaysia alone, plus those in Singapore, Indonesia, etc. Wikipedia has a pretty exhaustive rundown. Somewhat oddly, Kuala Lumpur does not have its own variety, which explains why you're not seeing laksa joints around ...


9

A typical Japanese breakfast consists of rice, miso soup, pickled vegetables and/or salad, fish, and possibly poached/cooked egg or natto. The price for this kind of breakfast starts at around 400 yen (at a family hotel or cheap restaurant). Lunch might be out of a bento box (with contents quite similar to the breakfast minus the soup), or in a restaurant ...


9

I'm aware of only one fish eye dish in Japan, namely maguro no medama-ni (マグロの目玉煮), "stewed tuna eyeballs". It's occasionally branded as the more palatable "マグロのDHA煮" after DHA, a fatty acid found in eyeballs and fish oil that's supposedly good for you. Like the name says, this consist of tuna eyeballs (which are pretty big!) stewed for hours on end in the ...


8

Basically there are two dishes that the city is famous for. the deep-dish pizza - made with a soft dough, cheese slices, chopped tomato sauce and a variety of ingredients on top. Hot dogs are made of beef, steamed or boiled meat and served with mustard, onion, sweet sauce and pickled cucumbers, sliced tomatoes and salt, ketchup is not added. However, ...


8

The Health Assist Blog outlines (quite comprehensively) the fast food of various countries globally. Part 1 illustrates fast food that can be obtained in the following european countries: Denmark The Netherlands Austria Belgium Finland Poland Sweden Germany United Kingdom http://www.healthassist.net/blog/food/world-fast-food-parti/ Part II illustrates ...


7

If you want to try Minke Whale and Puffin, you can get both of these in small portions at Tapas Barinn (The Tapas Bar), which serves them alongside more traditional Spanish tapas. You should also try the lobster soup at Sægreifinn, which come highly recommended (I'm not a big seafood fan but everyone I know who is and has tried it recommends it). Harðfiskur ...


7

In the Andes regions of Ecuador, Colombia and Peru I've been to several restaurants where they served cuy. There was no need to search for special cuy eateries, I just saw them randomly on people's plates. However I did not see any in restaurants in the low lands along the coast, but this could just be because they are not so popular there. I imagine that ...


7

Arguably, the national dish of Norway can be considered to be Fårikål - "sheep in cabbage" - pieces of mutton with bone, cabbage, whole black pepper and often a little wheat flour, cooked for several hours in a casserole, traditionally served with potatoes boiled in their jackets. In tradition, Norway's foods come from the natural food resources available ...


7

These foods are typically unique to where you eat them For example neither deep fried ice cream or honey chicken are "Chinese food" here in Canada. The Wikipedia article on American Chinese food does a pretty job of identifying which North American "Chinese food" dishes map to food you might eat in China and which do not. I don't know if you can construct a ...


6

Traditional Norwegian dishes are usually based on fish and game. Given that Bergen is a port town, I suspect that there are some stellar restaurants that specialize in seafood. Here are a few restaurants that showed up on several sites as highly-rated; I browsed through the menus and they looked good, also: Potetkjelleren Restaurant ...


6

When talking about fast food, I guess you have to split into two categories: Those restaurants operated by (inter-)national chains and "Street food". Why? When going to an unknown country, most people feel uneasy about eating just at the first place they come across due to hygiene considerations. For example, Starbucks in China is the prime place to go when ...


6

I think you were disappointed because the most famous Lao dishes have become popular in Thailand and a lot of the food you find in Laos without a local to help isn't really Lao food but Thai, Vietnamese, Chinese, and French food. The most famous Lao dishes have to be larb and green papaya salad. I never saw these on offer in non-touristy Surat Thani in ...


6

Sapporo, in Hokkaido, is famous for soup curry -- this is a unique Japanese-style curry soup with vegetables (lotus root, potatoes, etc.) and chicken, served with rice on the side. Soup curry places typically have a system where you can pick how hot you want it (from 1-40 or similar) -- the higher levels are really spicy. You can find pictures on the ...


5

It is a near-guarantee that you will eat several doses of lomo saltado while traveling in Peru. The dish features sauteed sirloin, some stir-fried vegetables, white rice, and lightly fried potatoes. The dish is ubiquitous in Peru, usually well-prepared, and quite cheap. You should be able to feast on some lomo saltado wherever your travels take you in ...


5

I would recommend: lamb - the Icelandic lamb is very flavorful and lean. skyr - a yogurt-like dairy product. If you are very adventurous you could also try things like putrescent shark meat (Hákarl), but don't expect it to taste good. You should also take a look at the Wikipedia's Icelandic cuisine page.


5

So in general, food in Hungary (eating out) is a lot less expensive than Western Europe, which is handy :) Note that - due to a historical translation error - "goulash soup" is indeed a soup, not the "goulash" that visitors may be familiar with from home which is known as "pörkölt". Local dishes often revolve around meat, include lots of paprika in their ...


5

Given the proximity to Thailand, and the migration between the two populaces, as well as cultural migration, there's always going to be some crossover. Wikipedia actually has a page on Lao cuisine. It notes the most famous Lao dish would be Larb (ລາບ) - "a spicy mixture of marinated meat and/or fish that is sometimes raw (prepared like ceviche) with a ...


5

The keyword is 郷土料理 kyōdo-ryōri "hometown food", and the Japanese Wikipedia has a very comprehensive list: 日本の郷土料理一覧 Unfortunately it's only in Japanese and Google Translate doesn't do a great job ("swine juice", anyone?). The place names do make it through reasonably well, and most all dishes have links to pages with pictures, so with a bit of effort you ...


4

We were up at Chichibu last weekend, and they were selling the Giant Sparrow Bees in a baby food jar in some kind of syrup and were told by the vendor that the stingers are removed and that the bees are Eaten after drinking the syrup. She demonstrated for us. They are supposedly food for building muscle and considered a delicacy


4

Try Jalan Alor, it's a traditional street with lots of food stalls where you can find different kinds of cheap authentic Malaysian and Chinese food, Laksa will be among them and you will get to see the picture menus before ordering. You will definitely go there few times to try all different kinds of food. Enjoy! Check Wonderful Malaysia for more ...



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