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-3

Hopefully they don't care, unless you're a "person of interest" to someone. That may unfortunately be way too often the case now with all of the overblown NSA tracking of everyone etc. And the NSA did absorb the US Customs service, so unfortunately they might. But for normal purposes, they only really care when someone enters, or when someone gets involved ...


0

There is no EU-wide system to handle penalty points and driving bans. In fact, those systems are probably more diverse than you realize, in some countries you 'lose' points until you have none and must surrender your license, in others you 'gain' points and exceeding a threshold has consequences. The number of points and thresholds for various offenses vary ...


1

European Transport Safety Council Directives Pre May 2015 Up until recently, individual European countries would set-up bilateral agreements regarding traffic regulation enforcement. This is the case for example for UK and Ireland; Switzerland and Italy; to name a few. Talks of unifying or regulating cross-border traffic infringements date way back. In ...


40

Yes, they almost certainly do know you've left. The US processes passport details for all air passengers through a system called APIS, and ties that to the electronic I-94 (arrival and departure record). You can check your US arrival and departure history online. This allows you to verify their record of your departure.


0

Point systems and driving bans are, unless national law says otherwise, country specific. There are no EU/EEA wide regulations for this subject. What will happen, if you as a Czech resident with a Czech driver's license manage to get so many violation points in Germany that they qualify for a driving ban, the German authorities will issue a driving ban for ...


2

Generally speaking laws are based on jurisdictions, not the person. Just because something is legal/illegal in your country, doesn't make it illegal/legal in a country you're visiting. Cops enforce their laws not yours. Plus, it would be a nightmare for bouncers to evaluate legality of the person based on their home country (this person is from Ontario, so ...


1

Can a visitor who is “of age” In the United States you are "of age" at 18, you just cant drink/buy until you are 21. Sadly there is no way around it, I am from mexico and in mexico drinking age is 18, once you cross the border you will get fined if you drink alcohol and are younger than 21. It also works both ways, people in the United States can ...


14

You're a Pedestrian, Act Like One In France roller skates and other wheeled contraptions are considered as games, rather than means of transportation, and are therefore not subject to any specific regulation. Indeed from a legal standpoint the French Traffic Code states that skaters are considered pedestrians and must therefore abide by the same rules. ...


1

It would be illegal to buy alcoholic beverages, and depending on where you are, it might be illegal to consume them, but for the most part, if you drink in a private setting, you are safe. Parents frequently allow their underage children to drink at home, and are only arrested for doing so if they also allow other people's children to drink as well. Don't ...


1

Typically you are always subject to the laws of the jurisdiction you are in unless you have diplomatic immunity. So if you are in the US, the US drinking laws apply to you. If you are in Germany, the German drinking laws apply to you. Your nationality doesn't matter - the laws of the place you are in matter.


1

No, you will not be able to drink legally within the United States. Purchasing alcoholic beverages as a minor, or knowingly purchasing alcohol for a minor, are both criminal offenses in all 50 states. Conversely, if someone underage were to travel to Australia and drink with you, then as long as they're old enough under Australian law, they are allowed ...


7

The short answer to the question is no: local laws apply everywhere you go, and the standard minimum drinking age in the United States is 21. The long answer is that yes, it is absolutely legal for someone under the age of 21 to purchase and consume alcohol in the United States— in certain areas, under the right circumstances. But those circumstances will ...


9

Simply put, no. As an UK immigrant myself, first arriving at age 19 (and effectively drinking in the UK since age 16) I certainly experienced this first hand. You have to be 21. Significantly, age is nearly always determined by requesting and reviewing a drivers license which has a picture of the person plus the date of birth. This is unlike my ...


-5

Drinking laws apply to the area you are in, Not the area you came from. In the United States the legal drinking limit is 21. HOWEVER I have been drinking since the age 18(now 29) :). If you know people, you will have fun.


0

In Hungary you may build a fire/have a barbecue while respecting the general rules of campfires (stay far from the forest area, clean the land of dry stuff before lighting a fire, put it out when you leave etc.). During the year the state officialities may issue "fire restriction periods" which are made public on websites and radio (but unfortunately only in ...


18

Age limits and such like are always those of the place you are in. While you are in another country you have to obey the local laws on drink, and other stuff, whatever your laws are back home. The good news is that you can do things that are legal in the place you are, even if they are illegal back home (with some exceptions), which is great news if you are ...


6

The answer in the broad sense is maybe. Due to State vs. Federal application of laws there are circumstances in which people under the age of 21 are allowed to drink within the state. But you will not be allowed to do this at a bar!! And you will not be allowed to purchase at the store! Some states may allow it in a presence of a parent. So if you are ...


50

The federal standards (that states lose highway funds for not following) are that you cannot purchase or publicly possess alcoholic beverages under the age of 21. Technically this is implemented as state laws, but it applies in all 50 states and DC. That means neither of you can buy alcohol legally. In addition, the general rule is that you can't ask someone ...


12

In my opinion, when in doubt it's always better to err on the safe side and get a new passport. Last thing you want to happen is to get bounced back at immigration checks due to a damaged passport. Quoting from my other answer on the topic: I checked the definitions of damaged passports and there seems to be a common denominator across countries. A ...


33

Missing pages generally invalidate a passport. Depending on how cleanly they were removed, a casual inspection might not notice, but if noticed, you will at the very least be in for some heavy questioning, and may be denied boarding/entry. Applying for a new passport is strongly advisable.


6

There are several aspects of the rules around marriage in France that would make your plan difficult. As far as I know, it's not forbidden to marry as a non-resident but the law is clearly not intended to make it easy. You need to complete some formalities beforehand (publication des bans). It should happen at least 10 days before the wedding but you also ...


1

Even when they do not measure now, it is likely that they will measure in the future. Are you willing to invest money in a good quality case that you might not be able to use on flights in the future. I have never seen them on the airport scales, but in many places they have little lines (or build in lines) that show the outlines on the maximum sizes. And ...


1

I know that in France you can get an international driver licence just by requesting it at police station. As a french citizen living in Paris, I would clearly not worry driving in France with a US licence. Authorities get used to have tourist with their own driving licence. They would check for the validity of your licence only if you get problems (driving ...


5

Depending in the state, the connectivity of the computer in the trooper's car, and the mood and/or ticket quota status of the trooper, you might be ok just by knowing your details. I left my wallet at home once, in my area drivers have 72 hours to produce so I went home, then to the police station and produced it. The desk officer called the issuing officer ...


4

This is a matter of state law, so the answer will vary by state; there is not a single answer for "the US". This article describes some of the possibilities and links to the relevant state laws. For example, in my home state of Colorado, CRS 42-2-101 (2) states that you may not drive unless you have your driver's license in your "immediate possession". ...


2

I find it utterly strange that the French embassy in the US claims that you need a notarized translation of your US license to drive in France and additionally recommends you to have an international driving permit (IDP), since the point of the IDP is to provide a cheap and standardized translation of a driver's license. It is also not difficult to find ...


1

They indicate that traffic will be slowing to leave the at the exit and extend to indicate that slower traffic will be entering. In Europe, it is not legal to overtake on the nearside, so it is a reminder for polite drivers to move out (if possible) to allow slowing traffic to leave and join. It is not illegal to cross them, but the gendarmes can always ...


21

It's called a “ligne de dissuasion” (literally “deterrence line”). The idea is to indicate that it's too late to switch from the leftmost lane to the exit. But it's not strictly forbidden to cross the line, especially in the other direction (from the rightmost lane to the leftmost lane), e.g. to overtake or make some space for someone getting on the ...


6

According to the Vienna Convention on Road Signs and Signals (http://www.unece.org/fileadmin/DAM/trans/conventn/signalse.pdf), Chapter IV, Article 26, paragraph 2 (a), a broken line can be used (i) "to demarcate lanes" or (ii) "to give warning of the approach to a continuous line ... or of the approach to another section of road presenting a particular ...


16

This page calls such lines lignes de dissuasion, saying that while crossing is allowed, it is discouraged. And for what I think is a more reliable site, here is a site that offers tests on the French auto code. It has a page on markings. It offers: Les lignes de dissuasion Souvent rencontrées sur les routes étroites et sinueuses. Elles ...


3

TL;DR: There is no problem taking a bath there, unless you run into some private people who think it's a bad idea personally. Long version: The question is if the well is on public land or not. Let's try to locate it and see: The pool the Wikipedia page refers to belongs to a completely different church (St Mary-in-the-Castle Church) and is in a ...


1

As far as my experience is concerned, it is the registered guest's prerogative as to whether to entertain guests in their room. If this were not the case then romantic rendezvous in hotels would not be permissible. I've never had a hotel decline this privilege and in many cases I have requested additional room keys for my guests. Of course, the maximum ...


5

To answer the concrete question, how airlines determine who is being malicious and who is actually missing their flight? By frequency. The airlines have IT systems that allow them to statistically track all fliers. They know what happens in 99% of the cases and how frequent cancellations or non-attendance for the second leg are. When someone maliciously, ...


6

For the most part, they do not, it is a waste of their resources. Onward travel on the same ticket will likely be voided, although in practise this depends on the IT competence of the airline in question. The airline may cancel your frequent flier account if you do it very frequently. In the United States, some airlines threaten to recover the fare ...


6

Based on your premise that the family does call in the fact that they need to cancel their booking due to a medical emergency then they have duly notified the airline and their missing the return flight would not mark them as "skipper-outers". Most of the major airlines do not sell "non-changeable" international tickets. The cheapest fares are ...


3

It's hardly necessary to go to Costa Rica (as Karlson suggested) to re-apply. This is not a visa. I think folks are getting the terms VWP and ESTA confused. I assume that the ESTA has been cancelled. One applies for an ESTA online. Mine was cancelled a few months ago. I received an email from CBP: There has been an update to your ESTA Travel Authorization ...


3

The only case I'm aware of where it's actually illegal to photograph something from a public place is when that something is a US military base or affiliated facility in Japan. Here's the Mutual Cooperation and Security Treaty under Article VI Facilities and Areas and the Special Criminal Act Attendant upon the Enforcement of the Agreement Regarding the ...


4

As far as I know, the bag-in-bag technique you mention is definitely not forbidden by airlines. On the contrary, airlines often suggest to wrap/bag luggage of unusual shapes or sizes, to avoid problems during baggage-handling procedures. This is the case of large backpacks for example, whose loose straps might get caught in the conveyor belts. Therefore I ...


7

You should have no problem using the bag. I have done similarly and I have seen many checked in bags that are not optimal to handle. A very broad range of "objects" are carried as check in baggage - a mere outer bag is far from unusual. If customs want to look inside your bag then they will look inside your bag. The only exception is if you make it so ...


9

Yes you can travel with furniture and other household goods in a van. That's what vans are made for. :) Three things you should consider: 1. Customs Unions No need to declare anything when crossing borders between countries that are part of a customs union. In Europe for example you have Switzerland that is inside Schengen but not inside the EU customs ...


13

As per the official EU Travel Guide: There are no limits on what private persons can buy and take with them when they travel between EU countries, as long as the products purchased are for personal use and not for resale, with exception of new means of transport. You do not have to prove the origin of the goods or show any sort of invoices, unless ...


5

As far as I know you can transport household goods with no value limit within the EU as long as you can prove you own them or that you paid tax on them in the EU country you bought them or paid duty on the border you brought them into the EU. As your friend owns the goods and not you, you should technically hold papers to prove that fact and that you ...


5

In reality, as long as the boy is accompanied by an adult, just walking on public streets in Japan late at night won't cause a substantial problem in most cases. If you are unlucky, a police officer might stop you and ask a few questions, but anything worse is unlikely to happen. Entering certain safe stores like convenience stores is OK, too. But I don't ...


18

As stated in fkraiem's answer, the relevant legislation applies only in Tokyo (although quite a few other places have similar laws). Here's the section in question: 東京都青少年の健全な育成に関する条例 青少年 十八歳未満の者をいう。 十八歳未満の者をいう (深夜外出の制限) 第十五条の四 保護者は、通勤又は通学その他正当な理由がある場合を除き、深夜(午後十一時から翌日午前四時までの時間をいう。以下同じ。)に青少年を外出させないように努めなければならない。 2 ...


13

The relevant legislation is here (in Japanese). This is only for Tokyo, the legislation in all other prefectures is similar but may differ in some details. Basically, it's "illegal" for parents to allow a minor to go out between 11pm and 4am except for going to work/school or for some other "justifiable reason". What constitutes a "justifiable reason" is as ...


5

The legal answer for why consular districts exist is that the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations specifies that consular posts are associated with consular districts, and a consular officer isn't allowed to exercise his functions outside his district except in special circumstances with the approval of the receiving state. Furthermore, a country can't ...



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