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4

Given that some airlines even give you a complimentary pyjama when flying in first class I'd say that it would be perfectly legal for you to wear one on the plane. Worst case scenario you'll get some looks from other passengers. Go ahead and fly comfortable.


4

Yes, you can wear your pajamas during a flight. You might get some strange looks, but there is nothing wrong with wearing them. Other options would be a 'sweat suit' with elastic at the waist and a t-shirt and hoodie for the top.


2

In Germany you are obliged to help and will be prosecuted if you do not. When giving first aid you are insured against being sued for breaking something, even if the helpee dies, you did your best. Every car driver has to do the first aid course and have the kit in the car. You are also insured against e.g. getting blood on your coat and having to get it ...


1

It seems your agent has printed out the receipts against a reservation system (like amadeus, galileo, etc.) which is typical for agents. They should have also provided you with a link where you can view your itinerary - something like a link to viewtrip.com which is Galileo's customer facing portal; or checkmytrip.com the equivalent for Amadeus. In both of ...


2

Note that the sign is specifically for St. Peter's Basilica, and not Vatican City. A small point considering the size of the place, but you have asked about Vatican City. If she is wearing the Hijab then there will be no issues; covering of the head/hair is common as a sign of respect (for women, for men, its opposite - you can't wear hats); and as ...


4

The advice given to me in my paramedic course, and the advice I give my students is along the lines of: Anyone can sue you for anything at any time, for any reason. (They won't necessarily be successful.) If you act in the best interests of the patient, acting as a reasonable and prudent person, you'll most likely be fine. A lot of people that are sued for ...


5

In Canada, we are trained to do many skills in basic first aid, and we can do them as long as we have consent or implied consent (i.e. unconscious person). The Good Samaritan Act in Canada allows us to do whatever our skills have taught us to do, and we cannot be sued for it. Having said that, I also have not seen anyone get sued for performing First Aid, ...


2

First, there are good samaritan laws that protect you if acting in good faith to provide assistance. As mentioned these vary state to state, but if you act within the scope of first aid they should protect you. However as also mentioned for someone who is conscious you must obtain consent. Note, I am not a lawyer, but a former paramedic. Essentially ask ...


3

Conversely, if you are trained and have the ability to potentially save a person’s life and you do not act, someone may be able to sue you anyway. I knew of a trained counselor that was sharing a residence with someone else. The roommate killed himself and the parents sued the counselor for not seeing the signs and acting by using his own skills, or report ...


41

Good Samaritan laws vary from state to state in the USA (all 50 states have one). Most states provide some level of protection from liability to trained medical personal, doctors, nurses, first responders, etc. Whether your UK training / licensing would qualify would depend on the wording of that state's law. Some states provide even broader protections ...


14

You can get arrested for any kind of physical behaviour between a fellow person, all it takes is a mistaken thought, a sensitive victim and a sheer amount of bad luck. Can it happen? Yes Will it happen? Maybe (Probably not) A lot of First aid is physical and not the soft kind of physical. It's an open ended book in which if you did somehow piss off that ...


2

The average European airport security is only marginally more patient than the TSA. That is to say, they are mini-dictators in their little realm. On top of that, they're paranoid, overworked and hated by all. It's not a productive mix. If they see this —and they will— they will inspect it. Some might buy that it's caffeine. Some wont. Nobody can tell you ...


2

Always carry: Labels Prescriptions Even if its in weird packets. I traveled quite a bit with herbal medicines that always raise issues: Powders Unmarked brownish/ olive/ sandy colored Pills in similar small plastic Herbal oils So, I carry: labels inside/ stuck on each little plastic sachet or bottle Detailed written Prescription from ...


0

I've carried on a container of white powder in the US and China, nobody has taken note of it. I've also carried multiple pounds of white powder still sealed in properly labeled manufactures packaging. That being said, I wouldn't bring a bag of powder, period. Put it in something more substantial!


3

I would avoid bringing samples of pure caffeine on aircraft because caffeine is somewhat toxic (1-10 g) and therefore is probably prohibited by flight regulations. Source: http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/05/18/caffeine-powder-poses-deadly-risks-2/


18

Airlines will bump up a departure time if they feel they can get the plane out earlier. It helps their on-time performance stats and gets everyone to their destination a little earlier. But this is done only when they are certain everyone will be onboard earlier. The decision would likely be based on 1) all originating passengers have checked in XX ...


9

Hard to tell. I do take a bunch of prescription drugs that I have consolidated into a single small zip lock bag for travel and that really looked fairly suspicious. No problems whatsoever in a 100+ domestic+international flights. Then again, your bag looks even more suspicious and a lot depends on how you may show up against expectations and profiles. This ...


54

That bag would show orange color on an x-ray machine which is the color for organic material (on most machines) and it would be very obvious even between layers of clothing which are also organic but would show a different shade(powder bag would be a very dark shade of orange). If I looked at your bag for a fraction of a second I would most likely pull it ...


22

It's possible that it might cause some concern given that it's unlabelled and white (that dodgy anthrax scare a few years back has done so much damage to air travel...sigh). However, most airports in Europe you just stroll through and don't have to get checked, quite often. If asked to declare, I'd be up front about it and mention it, rather than have them ...


1

They may not have levied a fine. To find out, you can try several alternatives... Apply for a visa Make a personal data access to the South African government Instruct a South African solicitor to check it for you All of these will work given enough time. If you are sure a fine was levied, then you can ask for them to send you the payment details. You ...


4

TSA Doesn't List Drones The closest things to drones I could find in TSA's database of packable items are radio controlled helicopters which apparently can be taken on a plane both as check-in as well as carry-on luggage. TSA even gives packing advice. Quoting from the linked site: Search Results For: RC helicopter Check or Carry-on You may ...


0

Both the governments(Nepal and India) have agreed to permit the use of INR500 and INR1000 notes. So it is totally legal to carry INR500, INR1000 notes to Nepal if you are going to Nepal.


0

An interesting wrinkle here to consider is if this illegal of the airlines in the first place. In essence it's the following deal: "I sell you one pound of beef for $10 or I sell you two pounds for $7. However you must eat the beef, you can't just throw it away or give to your neighbor". The key here is that the larger quantity is cheaper than the smaller ...


1

It happened to me--or I did once not take the second leg of a two leg trip. I left country A with a transfer in country B for final arrival at country C. My visa for country C was not issued, while I did have a visa for country B. So I just got off the flight in country B. As it turned out, and unbeknown to me, the airline then canceled my return booking ...


1

Idk...Calif has become really hyper-aware of everything in recent years. Almost to the point of paranoia. If you are going to sleep out then do it where you won't be noticed. Residential areas are out. Someone will most surely notice you and call the cops. Rest areas are ok for a night. But don't answer any raps on your window at 2:00 am. Truck stops are ...


2

As Mark Mayo's answer states, these two denominations were "banned" (either officially or unofficially) in the two countries due to issues with counterfeit notes. Other denominations were not banned since most fraud on high value items / purchases would involve these two denominations. While a lot of travel websites and guides state these are still banned, ...


8

At the moment, the general consensus is that Bitcoin is not a currency (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bitcoin, under 'Economics'). For the US and Canada, this page is pretty clear on what you need to declare when entering. Though a similar text for the UK explicitly states that the maximum amount refers to 'currencies', the US and Canada page refers to ...


2

The official Japan Customs Procedures of Passenger Clearance page omits any mention of seashells or shellfish. They fall under no category of Prohibited Articles, and under Restricted Articles, while it says Plants and animals must be presented to the plant or animal quarantine officer for quarantine inspection prior to Customs examination. the shells ...


11

India had tried to curb unauthorized trading between these countries by requesting they ban them. However, as of 2013, Nepal and India have agreed to allow 500, 1000 notes again. The Bhutan Monetary Authority also banned it for similar reasons. However, as of January 2015, the RBI has also allowed travelers to take these notes to Bhutan. So yes, that ...


75

Mark Mayo's answer is the best answer to this question; it is an appeal to common sense. I simply wanted to add some legal context for the UK. There are intersecting regulations for the EEA as a whole which are roughly similar. The 'generic' answer is that gun permits are generally issued by individual states, like Kentucky or Arizona. Individual states ...


27

Being a US citizen certainly does not exempt one from local laws, even visiting countries close to home. The OP didn't ask about Mexico, but it serves as a good case in point. From wikipedia: "The US Department of State warns US citizens [and all persons regardless of citizenship] against taking any firearm or ammunition into Mexico without prior written ...


47

Travelling with a firearm (in general) I've actually seen this scenario, where there has been an assumption by the (US) traveller that they would just be able to enter another country with their firearm. However, as @Mark Mayo states, each country has their own laws in this regard. It's important to realise other countries are likely to have much stricter ...


98

Every country has their own laws governing handguns. Your license is for the US, under US (or state-specific) laws. Firstly, you'd have trouble at the border, as you generally need permission or a license to carry a gun onboard a plane, boat, train, or bus, or across borders. Secondly, you would need a license under the laws of the country you're visiting ...


6

IT IS AN EXTREMELY BAD IDEA UNLESS FULLY COVERED BY INSURANCE AND EVEN THEN MAY BE A VERY BAD IDEA IF HE IS NOT USED TO US CONDITIONS You need to be absolutely certain that your "coverage for other drivers" does in fact cover him fully. There will be requirements re drivers licence that he must meet (not only will he need to have one but will probably need ...


9

Preface: I'm not a designer or a clotheshorse so these descriptions may be a bit rough Abaya just means "cloak"; there are many kinds of abaya, just like there are many kinds of jackets/coats. Just like most other things, the interpretation of the abaya varies differently from one region to the next. For example in the UAE abayas have large flowing sleeves ...


0

I was just sent a mail by GOL, a Brazilian Airline, saying that they allow the use of all electronics during the whole flight (though with some limitations on wifi and bluetooth). So, there's no consistency and, apparently, no harm in using cameras at all.


0

It is legal for them to do so. (well, there is not prescription in the consumer protection law forcing them to have a "free" cancellation before X number of days). Hotels seems to all have different policies regarding cancellation. I did not find a proper legal reference other than a "La Facture" In french: ...


2

It isn't really the airline's decision to choose which travel document you travel on. Yes, we all know for instance that you should enter the USA on the US passport (by law—if you have one), but should you enter the UK on your US passport or your Greek passport? The document you use will depend on the purpose of your visit, and your own circumstances. And ...


2

The countries that do not allow dual citizenship are very many more than just China and showing passports indicating two nationalities to an official of one of these may get the holder into trouble. Even where dual citizenship is not an issue, an entry stamp in one passport and an exit one in another may be inconvenient.


-3

10 years ago I was traveling from country A to country B, country A is my so-called home country. Like I explained in an other question it's one of the most corrupted countries. The officer insisted on knowing how am I going to enter country B. $50 dollars done the trick and he stamped passport A not my British passport. Country B had no problem with ...


3

At the end of the day it is your responsibility to make sure that you have the required Visas/etc for the country you are travelling to. However it is the airlines responsibility to check that you at least appear to meet the required entry requirements, which would include having a visa for the country, or a passport from a country that does not require a ...



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