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3

Much of the ex-USSR is, at least on paper, quite twitchy about using GPS devices; there was a well-publicized case in Russia in 1997 where an American engineer was (briefly) imprisoned for accidentally using one near a military area. That said, that was almost twenty years ago, and GPS in smartphones has become ubiquitous since then. Importing both ...


0

My Italian office-mate of long ago used to show his Italian license when stopped for speeding, which was often. Usually the cop didn't bother. (I did this in reverse once in Israel, where I had missed a stop sign.) But once the policeman offered him the choice between paying the fine on the spot or going to court for the rest of the day, and paying the fine ...


5

Oddly enough I wasn't able to find any information on this online, I'll continue to search in case I'm able to find something. Meanwhile, I'll tell you the general rules. As you would expect, it is entirely dependent on the policy of the country in which the airline is registered. Considering that, since the drinking age in Iceland is 20, the drinking age ...


4

In Israeli customs, you would be required to pay a fine (equal to the duty) regardless of whether you take the item. If you wish to take the item, you'd have to pay the duty too (so effectively you'd be paying double duty). For example, for a 400 ILS bottle of Whiskey, you'd pay a 411 ILS fine. If you choose to take the bottle, you'd also pay a 411 ILS ...


0

All Balkan countries that require registration of visitors without permanent address (an example is Montenegro) have some procedure for people staying in non-tourist accommodation. As far as I know this is always registering at the nearest police station. If you are staying in tourist accommodation, they (= people from the accommodation) will make this ...


2

I just spoke to my Romanian friend, who confirmed that this is technically legal. Having said that, it's not the safest thing ever, as Romania is known for high crime/theft rate against campers. If you're in the wild somewhere, it may be that much more difficult to get help if needed. There's some discussion of wild camping in Romania at this thread - ...


4

This letter only states that they have refused to allow you entry to Ireland because the purpose of your visit, as determined by the Irish immigration authorities, wasn't the one you have originally expressed. This is not the same as deportation but the effect in the end may be similar. As far as UK is concerned Ireland and UK it is quite likely that the ...


5

The rules are explained on the official EU website. It sometimes difficult to understand how they apply to a given situation but the page should be authoritative. In your case, my understanding is that you do need a visa to visit other European countries. To understand why, you have to make a few distinctions. Assuming you are talking about a short stay, ...


-1

What you need to do here is to do some homework before you commit yourself to traveling to North Korea. Contact the tour operator and also the North Korean embassy. You should ask specific questions about the hairstyle you have and send a recent photograph. Find out if they have any restrictions about hairstyles that apply to tourists also. A decision as ...


0

I have seen it in customs and assumed that it is about smuggling of illegal goods. I seem to recall that people have been carrying bags they received from new acquaintances and they turned out to be full of drugs. I have always taken this question not literally as 'did you physically put all the things in yourself, by yourself' but more as 'Is this a bag ...


2

The Saudis are less concerned about anti-"religious" books per se, than about anti-Moslem books. The greatest danger lies with anything that is anti- Mohammed, or anti- Islam, or even anti-clergy (religious men). If they are "anti-religious" in the sense of being anti-Christian, anti-Jewish, or pro atheist, the Saudis might not care. On the other hand, ...


2

The very existence of an airport transit area is a direct result of the country's laws. What can or cannot happen is entirely up to that country. Even immigration regulations (including regulations allowing transit without visas under certain conditions) fully apply. So, to the extent that local law allows it (if the authorities care about local law, ...


2

A recent report compared busking in cities around the world, finding Dublin to be the most receptive to buskers. Mexico City, however, not so much: Mexico City was named the least encouraging city in the report, where busking is illegal and could lead to imprisonment. So based on that, I'd very much recommend that they do NOT attempt busking in ...


1

I had this happen to me last month. Didn't realize it, as I walked out the hotel quite early expecting no issue whatsoever (CC had a limit at least 10 times higher, card was issued and used in NW Europe, nothing unusual about the hotel either, booked online in advance...). But a week later I received a letter at home, stating that they failed to charge my ...


10

If you are caught with smaller amounts of alcohol exceeding the allowed amount, the customs will offer you to accept a "forenklet forelegg", a kind of fixed rate fine used in the Norwegian legal system for minor issues, e.g. traffic violations or breach of the custom regulations. For beverages with 22.1 to 60% alcohol by volume, the rates are as such: up ...



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