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34

Here how it goes: After you pass the passport control desk, you will pass the customs desk. The guys at the customs desk will scan the luggage, if they found books or CDs they might ask you to show them. If they do not like them from the cover, they will take the books and/or CDs and give you a slip. The books will be sent to a department where they will ...


27

There is no nationally, or even locally mandated standard. I've certainly seen friends have no issues using both Passports and Drivers Licenses from their home country. I've also seen people have issues - especially when their ID is written in a non-latin script, or when they have a DOB which can be misread by using a non-American date ordering scheme, (i.e. ...


27

Your question has both legal, but perhaps more important, also moral aspects. Generally speaking, when airborne, an aircraft is subject to the legislation of the carrier's home country. So far so good. I am not sure if medical doctors according to US law is both legally required to help in an emergency and liable to damages they inflict even if practicing ...


22

Let me first state that I've lived in Dubai for a solid 19 years (years 0 to 19). In these 19 years, I have done almost everything there is to do in Dubai and been almost every place there is to go (including going to night clubs even though I was under age). At the outset, let me clarify this: I'd wish to visit Dubai with my girlfriend, but after ...


20

I used to 'get around this' technicality by asking at the info desks at airports where there might be a power point to charge my laptop etc, even if I'd spotted some. They'd usually helpfully point out one, or say 'oh just use any you find'. That way I figured I'd be able to argue being covered if it came down to security yelling at me or worse. I've also ...


19

There's a simple third option -- don't change your booking. You've booked it for a month, so it's yours for a month, it's not the host's problem if you leave before the full month is up.


17

Generally bars have always asked me for my passport in the US. It's frustrating as you'd rather not take your passport out to town, but when I've tried to take my driver's license as ID, I've either been turned away, or had to really ask nicely and still get told to bring my passport next time. In New Zealand, they're as strict - you either show a NZ ...


17

There is no limit, if it's more than 10'000 USD however, you need to declare it: There is no limit on the amount of money that can be taken out of or brought into the United States. However, if a person or persons traveling together and filing a joint declaration (CBP Form 6059-B) have $10,000 or more in currency or negotiable monetary instruments, they ...


16

There is no limit to the amount of cash you can carry, however if you are carrying more than $10,000 USD (or equivalent in foreign currency) then you must declare it (full details on how to do that at the URL above). However bringing cash is very rarely the best strategy for foreign exchange. Although your credit or ATM cards might charge you a fee when ...


16

It happens regularly in NZ, because of the fruit and plant matter laws. The point is, you're reminded so many times, and given a form where you have to tick 'I don't have this, or this, or this', that not knowing is really not an excuse. Like any country, ignorance of the law is not a valid reason to break it. By the time you've got to that point, it's ...


16

In Switzerland it will depend if it's an illegal article or if you fail to pay duty. In the first case (if it's mildly illegal, usually counterfeit watches, I'm not talking guns or anything) they'll just seize it and destroy it, no fine involved. There is a slight chance that the copyright owner might sue you, but I think the chances are you'll just lose ...


15

It's not theft. Unless otherwise noted, intentionally blocked, or obviously intended for some other purpose (e.g. to plug in an ATM), the outlets in the waiting area are specifically there for passenger convenience. In fact, airliners and airports are specifically expanding this functionality for more people to take advantage of; Omaha's Eppley Airfield ...


14

The answer will vary from country to country and from hotel to hotel, but in general you're not allowed to do this and if the hotel finds it out, they can kick you out or charge you a fine. In some countries they can even throw you in prison (worst case). For example in the USA there is the Defrauding an innkeeper law: A person who, with intent to ...


14

The area you will cover is a bit broad but there are generally rules that you can follow: If you see the No Overnight Parking sign that has an obvious meaning. There are plenty of roadside motels and camping grounds where you can park overnight and sleep. The municipalities may institute their own rules for overnight parking and sleeping in cars so when ...


14

California has some rigorous laws against vagrancy and homelessness and depending upon local ordinances or just plain bad luck you could be in for a nightmare. If you have to do it, try to be outside the city limits. Based upon what you wrote, you will most likely have a license plate that identifies a rent-a-car. That will flag up as unusual for anybody ...


13

Basically, in France, smoking is forbidden indoors except in private places and allowed outdoors. The law changed considerably around 2007–2008, so if you last came to France over 10 years ago, the situation then has nothing to do with the situation now. Smoking is forbidden in covered spaces in government and other public buildings, in public transport ...


13

Various online sources (Lonely Planet, Tripadvisor, USA Today, Dubai FAQ) seem to agree that as long as you don't start making out in public and telling people that you're not married, or attract the attention of the police in other ways, you'll be breaking the law but are very unlikely to get into trouble. People in general, and hotel staff especially ...


12

While I've never seen this on a customs form, or been asked this at customs, it used to be super popular at checkin. I never lie, so this would happen: Did you pack your bags yourself? Yes. And then Have the bags been out of your sight or control since you packed them? Yes, I left them at the hotel bag drop all day, or the conference bag drop all ...


12

It depends what you were charged with. For example, Americans with a DUI are not admissible to Canada, but Canadians with a DUI are admissible to the US. An assault conviction won't exclude you, but aggravated battery will, etc. So step 1 is to see if you have anything to worry about. The link in Annoyed's answer is a great start. Next, they don't ...


12

As you saw on the official TSA Blog, it says explicitly "Frozen gels/liquids are permitted if required to cool medical and infant/child exemptions. Frozen gels/liquids for any other purpose are not permitted." So it's off limits in the USA. The UK for example states the definition of liquid by matter of subject (such as all drinks etc) instead of ...


11

I am a "bouncer" in Boston. As far as the state of Massachusetts goes, it is very clear: Boston bars must ID all people who appear to be under the age of 30. Acceptable identification includes: U.S drivers license, U.S liquor identification, U.S military card, and all U.S. and international passports recognized by the U.S. What is NOT accepted: ...


11

You could ask the US consulate/embassy (with the risk that you are making them aware of your situation) or a lawyer. Your passport should be good and US authorities would not generally have access to criminal records from all other countries in the world (but might have some agreement with Canada, I really don't know). Some (but not all) convictions must ...


11

Similar to one of your last questions regarding China, asking for concrete non-chinese documentation on Chinese regulations is in most cases not answerable. Why? Chinese officials are not known for transparency, rather the opposite. A lot of things, while visible at the surface through actions like stickers, blocked websites etc are extremely hard to find ...


11

When you are departing from the UK and travelling to a non-EU country, you have to declare if you have €10000 or equivalent at UK customs (around $13000). Then on entry to the USA you will have to declare if you are carrying $10000 or more. Also make sure you have some documentation on you to show the 'source of your funds', bank statement, receipts etc... ...


11

There are at least four aspects to this question: Legal obligation Legitimation Liability Moral Obligation Legal obligation is a common misconception. While generally there exists an obligation not only for medical professionals but for every person to help in most (all?) countries in the world, this obligation does not work the way laymen think. You ...


11

To expand the other answer and my comment ... Why do you want to do this? Your profile says you plan to live in Sweden for a bit then Canada. I'm assuming you want to take the Taser to Canada, and there it might be legal, the prohibited weapons lists says only: 30 Device with incapacitating electric charge shorter than 480 mm This category ...


11

Depends on the country, on the actual thing that was found (i.e. which law it violates - agricultural, alcohol&tobacco, customs duties, etc), on whether or not it's actually illegal to import (as opposed to just subject to declaration but legal to import), and I'm guessing on the mood of the customs official as well. Supposedly, in Canada an undeclared ...


10

The authoritative answer is at Way to Russia, but I'll summarize for posterity. Whoever you're staying with, be it hotel or apartment, is supposed to take care of registering you. They can take care of the registration at any police station or post office, you do not need to be present. When it's done, they'll get a piece of paper for you that confirms ...


10

Not without getting into what's technically defined as "outer space". From Wikipedia: There is no international agreement on the vertical extent of sovereign airspace (the boundary between outer space—which is not subject to national jurisdiction—and national airspace), with suggestions ranging from about 30 km (19 mi) (the extent of the highest ...


10

How exactly would they "not allow" this? What do you imagine they could legally do to prevent it? However, it usually has severe disadvantages for you: In most cases it will be more expensive (assuming both legs are the same airline). It's VERY rare for two separate tickets to cost less than a combined one; in fact in many cases the combined ticket will ...



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