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128

From http://www.cbp.gov/travel/customer-service/handle-complaints: Complaints concerning allegations of misconduct/discrimination The U.S. Customs and Border Protection takes allegations of employee misconduct and discrimination very seriously. Allegations of misconduct or discrimination are referred to the CBP Office of Internal Affairs. ...


105

You don't have to be too worried about it, since the aircraft is able to cope with this. People are instructed to turn them off in order to avoid some disturbances and parasite noise in the communication between the pilot and the airport. As electronic devices using radio frequencies, they could also in theory cause some troubles to some aircraft equipment's ...


102

Every country has their own laws governing handguns. Your license is for the US, under US (or state-specific) laws. Firstly, you'd have trouble at the border, as you generally need permission or a license to carry a gun on-board a plane, boat, train, or bus, or across borders. Secondly, you would need a license under the laws of the country you're ...


82

Mark Mayo's answer is the best answer to this question; it is an appeal to common sense. I simply wanted to add some legal context for the UK. There are intersecting regulations for the EEA as a whole which are roughly similar. The 'generic' answer is that gun permits are generally issued by individual states, like Kentucky or Arizona. Individual states ...


82

This is not prohibited. Technically, you should do it while wearing your seat belt, but I've never seen this enforced except during takeoff and landing, or during turbulence. Last year I was on a Delta flight from Atlanta to London during a severe winter storm, in which almost all passengers missed their flight (due to cancelled inbound flights, or road ...


70

Maybe not exactly the answer to your question, but according to this site (see Section XIV, Chapter 71, HS code 7108131000), Russia imposes a 20% customs duty on the importation of gold bars. So unless you have 5.3 million rubles on hand to pay the customs duty (or can break off a fifth of the bar), expect the customs officers to hold on to your gold bar ...


69

As a cabin crew member for long time, I can tell you that your responsibility ends by notifying a crew member, that's it. Let the crew members deal with it. This is true for all other violations, unless it's a life threatening situation that cannot wait, for example fire! Grab the extinguisher and fight the fire. But that's a whole different issue. ...


61

Short answer: Yes, it appears you can, I wouldn't. Longer answer. I certainly can't find anything that would prevent you from doing so, there's similar threads over on FlyerTalk and Yahoo! Answers where people come to the same conclusion. Additionally there's at least one case of it actually happening. However, as noted it those threads and the comments, ...


59

It's allowed, I have personally seen a passenger who booked a seat for a bag. I then asked the passenger and he said it was gold. I was an operating flight attendant. I also do not recall any rules regarding prohibiting gold onboard, (from an aviation point of view) unless it was in the shape of a knife I assume. Just check with the airline you are flying ...


55

That bag would show orange color on an x-ray machine which is the color for organic material (on most machines) and it would be very obvious even between layers of clothing which are also organic but would show a different shade(powder bag would be a very dark shade of orange). If I looked at your bag for a fraction of a second I would most likely pull it ...


53

Yes, if aircraft safety or your personal safety requires it, you will be asked to sit down and close your safety belt. That is true for all aircraft and any time of the year. Maybe they will allow you a bit more leeway because they understand that prayer is important for you, but if you do not belt in when it is dangerous, they endanger all passengers, ...


53

I have met the "fruit sniffing" dog several times and am aware (from watching Border Security) of currency-sniffing and firearms-sniffing dogs in addition to the classic drug-sniffers. Generally, these dogs sniff people's bags more than people. (The Canadian beagle that met my flight from the Caribbean once sat [the dog's signal] about my bag, but the ...


53

Good Samaritan laws vary from state to state in the USA (all 50 states have one). Most states provide some level of protection from liability to trained medical personal, doctors, nurses, first responders, etc. Whether your UK training / licensing would qualify would depend on the wording of that state's law. Some states provide even broader protections ...


51

Provided there were no other sign or rule forbidding it, turning was perfectly fine. The red X cross on blue background means it's forbidden to stop (absolutes Halteverbot). It's somewhat similar to the more well-known “no parking” sign, but stricter (parking is defined as leaving your vehicle or letting it stand longer than three minutes whereas this signs ...


51

Travelling with a firearm (in general) I've actually seen this scenario, where there has been an assumption by the (US) traveller that they would just be able to enter another country with their firearm. However, as @Mark Mayo states, each country has their own laws in this regard. It's important to realise other countries are likely to have much stricter ...


50

The federal standards (that states lose highway funds for not following) are that you cannot purchase or publicly possess alcoholic beverages under the age of 21. Technically this is implemented as state laws, but it applies in all 50 states and DC. That means neither of you can buy alcohol legally. In addition, the general rule is that you can't ask someone ...


48

Given that some airlines even give you a complimentary pyjama when flying in first class I'd say that it would be perfectly legal for you to wear one on the plane regardless of which class you're flying in. Worst case scenario you'll get some looks from other passengers. Go ahead and fly comfortable.


44

Generally speaking, "yes". A BA aircraft is registered in the UK and therefore is covered by the UK laws. Under the UK law it's an offence not to obey the order of the flight crew while on the aircraft. Specifically, this is covered by the Air navigation order 2009, section 142(c): A person must not while in an aircraft ... (c) intentionally interfere ...


41

Yes, they almost certainly do know you've left. The US processes passport details for all air passengers through a system called APIS, and ties that to the electronic I-94 (arrival and departure record). You can check your US arrival and departure history online. This allows you to verify their record of your departure.


37

Basically it is a warning of the potential for rock falls. Two warnings built into one, 1) rocks could being falling into your path or on your vehicle 2) rocks could have fallen and maybe on the roadway ahead. Your actions should be to watch not only the normal driving issues, but also keep your eyes out for rocks that maybe be present on the roadway or ...


34

Missing pages generally invalidate a passport. Depending on how cleanly they were removed, a casual inspection might not notice, but if noticed, you will at the very least be in for some heavy questioning, and may be denied boarding/entry. Applying for a new passport is strongly advisable.


32

I am a software engineer and I also test the software on many different smartphones and tablets. I fly frequently within Europe, so my answer will be limited to this area. However, this is also from west to east and east to west, outside of the Schengen region! As a Dutch citizen, I rarely need a visa to travel, which makes this easy. I do carry a lot of ...


32

The EU policy is crystal clear: passengers must be given the possibility of opting out from a security scanner. In this case the passenger shall be screened by an alternative screening method including at least a hand search; The UK government attempted to resist opt outs going so far in 2010, per this Guardian article Earlier this month two women, ...


31

You will know when you are arrested in the United States because an officer will say explicitly that, and read you your rights (just like on TV). You may be read your rights before or after you are arrested, but if this did not happen at all, it's unlikely you were officially arrested. An arrest also requires a lot of paperwork by the police, so if you were ...


30

Tickets get checked once in a while, usually by people with nondescript clothes waiting for passengers exiting the platforms or getting into the carriage and revealing themselves as ticket inspectors once the doors close and the train is on the move. Happened to me once or twice when working in Berlin and commuting by public transport for 6+ months a few ...


30

Offically the answer seems to be yes. There's no mention of bullet proof vests (or any item of clothing) on the BA information page or restricted items document. Equally there's no mention in the Heathrow restricted items page. However, I can see a great many practical problems that may be thrown in your way. Aside from the discomfort and inconvenience of ...


29

Anecdotally, you can buy gold at a vending machine in Abu Dhabi airport, in the outgoing terminal. Whilst policies at destinations will vary of course, it's highly unlikely to be widely illegal whilst being sold at an airport. Gold ATMs are available across the world - not sure I would have believed it if I hadn't seen it myself while transiting through Abu ...


29

Being a US citizen certainly does not exempt one from local laws, even visiting countries close to home. The OP didn't ask about Mexico, but it serves as a good case in point. From Wikipedia article on gun politics in Mexico: "The US Department of State warns US citizens [and all persons regardless of citizenship] against taking any firearm or ammunition ...


28

While there are no guarantees, you can always file a claim for redress under the DHS TRIP program (Traveler Redress Inquiry Program). This program is intended for people who, among other things, are: Denied or delayed airline boarding; Denied or delayed entry into and exit from the United States at a port of entry; or Continuously referred to ...


28

There are two issues that sometimes get confused: What's allowed on the plane - This is determined by security rules. If a prescription drug is not a liquid that takes you over the liquids limit, then it's allowed. If it takes you over the limit, it's generally still allowed as long as you can prove that it was prescribed to you. Prescription drugs in pill ...



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