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27

Very simple: From the US State Department Website last sentence. A federal or state law enforcement agency may request the denial of a passport on several regulatory grounds under 22 CFR 51.70 and 51.72. The principal law enforcement reasons for passport denial are a federal warrant of arrest, a federal or state criminal court order, a condition of ...


27

There is no nationally, or even locally mandated standard. I've certainly seen friends have no issues using both Passports and Drivers Licenses from their home country. I've also seen people have issues - especially when their ID is written in a non-latin script, or when they have a DOB which can be misread by using a non-American date ordering scheme, (i.e. ...


27

Your question has both legal, but perhaps more important, also moral aspects. Generally speaking, when airborne, an aircraft is subject to the legislation of the carrier's home country. So far so good. I am not sure if medical doctors according to US law is both legally required to help in an emergency and liable to damages they inflict even if practicing ...


20

I used to 'get around this' technicality by asking at the info desks at airports where there might be a power point to charge my laptop etc, even if I'd spotted some. They'd usually helpfully point out one, or say 'oh just use any you find'. That way I figured I'd be able to argue being covered if it came down to security yelling at me or worse. I've also ...


19

Cuban refugees in the 1960s who were given US residency did not have access to US passports until they became citizens. They were unable to obtain Cuban passports. They were instead issued a passport-like re-entry document by the United States which they used for travel to third countries. If Ecuador or another country issued such a document Snowden could ...


17

A summary of fuel dumping and the ethics of it are on My philosophy on Fuel Dumping on hackmytrip.com: Fuel dumping is a method by which a fuel surcharge on an international fare is removed through the addition of one or more additional unrelated segments. Because of IATA (International Air Transport Association) rules that few people understand ...


17

In short, Putin's wrong, or at least oversimplifying drastically. Airport transit areas are exempted from immigration regulations, but they are very much the country's property, under its authority and jurisdiction. As a simple example, if you're transiting via an airport and are caught carrying contraband there, you'll be punished under the transit ...


17

Generally bars have always asked me for my passport in the US. It's frustrating as you'd rather not take your passport out to town, but when I've tried to take my driver's license as ID, I've either been turned away, or had to really ask nicely and still get told to bring my passport next time. In New Zealand, they're as strict - you either show a NZ ...


17

There is no limit, if it's more than 10'000 USD however, you need to declare it: There is no limit on the amount of money that can be taken out of or brought into the United States. However, if a person or persons traveling together and filing a joint declaration (CBP Form 6059-B) have $10,000 or more in currency or negotiable monetary instruments, they ...


16

There is no limit to the amount of cash you can carry, however if you are carrying more than $10,000 USD (or equivalent in foreign currency) then you must declare it (full details on how to do that at the URL above). However bringing cash is very rarely the best strategy for foreign exchange. Although your credit or ATM cards might charge you a fee when ...


15

It's not theft. Unless otherwise noted, intentionally blocked, or obviously intended for some other purpose (e.g. to plug in an ATM), the outlets in the waiting area are specifically there for passenger convenience. In fact, airliners and airports are specifically expanding this functionality for more people to take advantage of; Omaha's Eppley Airfield ...


14

The area you will cover is a bit broad but there are generally rules that you can follow: If you see the No Overnight Parking sign that has an obvious meaning. There are plenty of roadside motels and camping grounds where you can park overnight and sleep. The municipalities may institute their own rules for overnight parking and sleeping in cars so when ...


14

California has some rigorous laws against vagrancy and homelessness and depending upon local ordinances or just plain bad luck you could be in for a nightmare. If you have to do it, try to be outside the city limits. Based upon what you wrote, you will most likely have a license plate that identifies a rent-a-car. That will flag up as unusual for anybody ...


13

Basically, in France, smoking is forbidden indoors except in private places and allowed outdoors. The law changed considerably around 2007–2008, so if you last came to France over 10 years ago, the situation then has nothing to do with the situation now. Smoking is forbidden in covered spaces in government and other public buildings, in public transport ...


12

When a travelling companion of mine had their passport stolen in South Africa, the NZ High Commission issued a ETD (Emergency Travel Document). This was a substitute for a passport. However, if the government has revoked a passport, they're unlikely to issue such a document. So then you're left with a few other methods. In some places, national ID cards ...


12

It depends what you were charged with. For example, Americans with a DUI are not admissible to Canada, but Canadians with a DUI are admissible to the US. An assault conviction won't exclude you, but aggravated battery will, etc. So step 1 is to see if you have anything to worry about. The link in Annoyed's answer is a great start. Next, they don't ...


12

The answer will vary from country to country and from hotel to hotel, but in general you're not allowed to do this and if the hotel finds it out, they can kick you out or charge you a fine. In some countries they can even throw you in prison (worst case). For example in the USA there is the Defrauding an innkeeper law: A person who, with intent to ...


11

I have damaged a rental car - not from driving on the wrong side of the road but crunching it against a curb while turning around in a tight spot. We had declined their extra insurance because my credit card provides that as a benefit. The credit card company said to just send them the proof that I had rented the car as well as the receipts for damages. The ...


11

The current law in Germany divides between Exhibitionism (§183 Abs. 1): Only applicable to men (!), there was in fact a constituitional complaint which was rejected by the highest court in Germany. The targeted person needs to feel bothered and the exhibitionist must display a sexual pose (erection, sudden exposure, display before minors). Punishable ...


11

I am a "bouncer" in Boston. As far as the state of Massachusetts goes, it is very clear: Boston bars must ID all people who appear to be under the age of 30. Acceptable identification includes: U.S drivers license, U.S liquor identification, U.S military card, and all U.S. and international passports recognized by the U.S. What is NOT accepted: ...


11

You could ask the US consulate/embassy (with the risk that you are making them aware of your situation) or a lawyer. Your passport should be good and US authorities would not generally have access to criminal records from all other countries in the world (but might have some agreement with Canada, I really don't know). Some (but not all) convictions must ...


11

Similar to one of your last questions regarding China, asking for concrete non-chinese documentation on Chinese regulations is in most cases not answerable. Why? Chinese officials are not known for transparency, rather the opposite. A lot of things, while visible at the surface through actions like stickers, blocked websites etc are extremely hard to find ...


11

When you are departing from the UK and travelling to a non-EU country, you have to declare if you have €10000 or equivalent at UK customs (around $13000). Then on entry to the USA you will have to declare if you are carrying $10000 or more. Also make sure you have some documentation on you to show the 'source of your funds', bank statement, receipts etc... ...


11

There are at least four aspects to this question: Legal obligation Legitimation Liability Moral Obligation Legal obligation is a common misconception. While generally there exists an obligation not only for medical professionals but for every person to help in most (all?) countries in the world, this obligation does not work the way laymen think. You ...


10

If you rent a car, you will always need to have an insurance. Most often it is included it in the rental sum and you're only liable up to some amount, which is in the 500 pound range. You can buy additional insurance to cover even these expenses. They will always give you an offer on pick-up, because that's a money-maker. This is my experience from renting ...


10

Lost earnings - nope. Some travel insurance might cover that, but almost all won't, and the airline won't normally be liable for that sort of thing. The airline is pretty much always liable in such cases for sorting you out with accommodation and food, which it sounds like they have. (They probably don't have to cover your taxi if you decline the hotel, but ...


10

The only likely legal limitation is that there must be a seat belt for every passenger. Some states only require seat belts for passengers in the front seat, or under a certain age (such as 13). But to be safe, make sure every passenger is buckled in, and you will have no problems anywhere in the U.S. EDIT As per the NHTSA summary ...


10

This very likely violates the airline's terms. ("Illegal" might be putting it too strongly.) For example, here is the relevant passage from United Airlines' Contract of Carriage. J) Prohibited Practices: Fares apply for travel only between the points for which they are published. Tickets may not be purchased and used at fare(s) from an ...


10

Not without getting into what's technically defined as "outer space". From Wikipedia: There is no international agreement on the vertical extent of sovereign airspace (the boundary between outer space—which is not subject to national jurisdiction—and national airspace), with suggestions ranging from about 30 km (19 mi) (the extent of the highest ...



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