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46

Anecdotal evidence only. I have had this situation happen to me on a couple of different occasions. It's always resulted in one of two outcomes: They hold the entire plane (seems most common for shorter delays, late arrivals, lots of late passengers.) They put you on the next flight (seems more common when it's just 1-2 passengers or there is a very long ...


45

No, you are not obligated to run and running is likely prohibited in the terminal.** But, there is never a reason to do so in the situation you described. Connection time is based on the incoming flight and airport characteristics. The airline will only book an itinerary that meets this requirement on normal operational days. Everyone has to ...


28

It seems almost everyone is in the "no" camp, however there doesn't seem to be a lot of corroborating evidence presented. Here's an excerpt from American Airline's Conditions of Carriage Carrier undertakes to use its best efforts to carry the passenger and baggage with reasonable dispatch. Times shown in timetables or elsewhere are not guaranteed ...


20

Obviously, they cannot make it a requirement to go faster than standard speed. That's why they have minimum connection times defined for each airport; this time reflects the time a normal walker will need plus a bit. They do expect you to not idle around and shop for food or coffee or gifts on this walk; if you do that, you are on your own.


8

This would be a silly restriction to expect people to run to catch a gate, considering that airlines do not have a policy of carrying only those that are fit to run. They have families with small children, elderly passengers, passengers with disabilities, passengers that are new to the airport, very young passengers, passengers with language issues - and ...


7

Well, you can run, but it might be useless: A few years ago, I and two others had a very tightly planned connection in Madrid. We ran all the way from one terminal to the other and made it in time. Trying to board we were asked to step aside. After all other passengers had boarded the plane, we were informed that we would not be entering it, as the computer ...


7

Easy. You slowly brake and wait for space in the main lanes of traffic. Should the driver behind you crash into your car, he would be considered at-fault in pretty much every jurisdiction out there as tailgating is strictly prohibited. Another thing you might do is flash your brake lights a few times to indicate your intentions. Hopefully this should ...


7

The second paragraph is saying that any luggage that is heavier than 8kg or bigger than the maximum dimensions will be checked in, and you will be charged for it. This is regardless of whether there is or isn't space in the flight to accomodate it. In other words, if your bag doesn't respect the rules, it will be checked-in. I think the regulation you ...


6

American Airlines website gives you choices to book flights with insufficient time to get from one end of the terminal to the other. The geniuses who made this website are unaware of this. Therefore it is up to YOU to guess how far it is from one gate to the other, with little information to make this decision. I have missed flights and have always been put ...


5

You are not obligated to run but would you rather miss a flight and waste hours at the airport for the next flight? If you know you can't run then you should book a longer transfer time instead of making a point to the airline that their transfer time is too short for you. Because in the end of the day you are the one wasting your own time. As long as there ...


5

From the CBP website regarding warrant check: Many travelers wonder if CBP is alerted when an inbound passenger has a warrant for their arrest issued. Yes, CBP is alerted. In the air passenger environment, air carriers transmit passenger information to CBP through the Advance Passenger Information System (APIS). CBP officers also rely on the Interagency ...


4

The question asks "are you obligated to run". Yes, if you are safely able for yourself and others, regardless of any posted rules to the contrary. If you are unable or unwilling (makes no practical difference) to make it on time under your own power, you are obligated to notify some agent of the airline or airport so that they may have an opportunity to: ...


3

If there is traffic in the outer lane, I am stuck and I cannot exit. I can also not stop safely. Should I keep driving in circles in the inner lane until there is space to exit to the outer lane? In some countries, this is exactly what must be done. You must continue to make circles on the inner lane, until you can safely change it. You must be driving on ...


3

Try to not get influenced by other drivers who are breaking the rules. It's 'his problem' he is tailgating and he will be at fault if he hits you. Driving a Smart people often do not want to let me get in front of them (has the reputation of slow car because it in fact does not accelerate that fast.) and what I do is turn on my signals a little early*, ...


1

If vehicles are driving at 100km/h (= 60 mph) and the space between all of them is less than the length of your car, then they are all homicidal maniacs. Even assuming the are all "tailgating", their minimum reaction time will be about half a second, and at 100km/h they will travel about 14 meters in that distance. An average sized compact car is about 5 ...


1

Technically, 'No'. You are ultimately responsible for accepting the connection as part of your booking, so you must accept the consequences of it. If we take as a starting point, booking a flight from A to B and not turning up, then I am sure you would agree that is not the airlines problem. You may have recourse on your travel insurance or in the nature ...


1

I can only answer with one anecdote. The anecdote involves a slight delay on my incoming flight, but according to Delta it turned out to be not as relevant as other posts here would lead me to believe. In 2012, I was flying into Detroit (DTW) with a ~45 min layover before my outgoing flight to PDX, both operated by Delta. My incoming flight was delayed due ...


1

Mirrors are a very important aspect of driving, and if not set correctly navigating certain areas will become increasingly difficult. Set your mirrors to see your blind spots. A good way to start is to take your rear view mirror, and adjust the side mirrors so that for their relative side their visibility is barely touching the visibility of that side on ...



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