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99

Every country has their own laws governing handguns. Your license is for the US, under US (or state-specific) laws. Firstly, you'd have trouble at the border, as you generally need permission or a license to carry a gun onboard a plane, boat, train, or bus, or across borders. Secondly, you would need a license under the laws of the country you're visiting ...


75

Mark Mayo's answer is the best answer to this question; it is an appeal to common sense. I simply wanted to add some legal context for the UK. There are intersecting regulations for the EEA as a whole which are roughly similar. The 'generic' answer is that gun permits are generally issued by individual states, like Kentucky or Arizona. Individual states ...


60

Short answer: Yes, it appears you can, I wouldn't. Longer answer. I certainly can't find anything that would prevent you from doing so, there's similar threads over on FlyerTalk and Yahoo! Answers where people come to the same conclusion. Additionally there's at least one case of it actually happening. However, as noted it those threads and the comments, ...


55

That bag would show orange color on an x-ray machine which is the color for organic material (on most machines) and it would be very obvious even between layers of clothing which are also organic but would show a different shade(powder bag would be a very dark shade of orange). If I looked at your bag for a fraction of a second I would most likely pull it ...


53

Yes, if aircraft safety or your personal safety requires it, you will be asked to sit down and close your safety belt. That is true for all aircraft and any time of the year. Maybe they will allow you a bit more leeway because they understand that prayer is important for you, but if you do not belt in when it is dangerous, they endanger all passengers, ...


53

Good Samaritan laws vary from state to state in the USA (all 50 states have one). Most states provide some level of protection from liability to trained medical personal, doctors, nurses, first responders, etc. Whether your UK training / licensing would qualify would depend on the wording of that state's law. Some states provide even broader protections ...


51

I have met the "fruit sniffing" dog several times and am aware (from watching Border Security) of currency-sniffing and firearms-sniffing dogs in addition to the classic drug-sniffers. Generally, these dogs sniff people's bags more than people. (The Canadian beagle that met my flight from the Caribbean once sat [the dog's signal] about my bag, but the ...


50

The federal standards (that states lose highway funds for not following) are that you cannot purchase or publicly possess alcoholic beverages under the age of 21. Technically this is implemented as state laws, but it applies in all 50 states and DC. That means neither of you can buy alcohol legally. In addition, the general rule is that you can't ask someone ...


50

Provided there were no other sign or rule forbidding it, turning was perfectly fine. The red X cross on blue background means it's forbidden to stop (absolutes Halteverbot). It's somewhat similar to the more well-known “no parking” sign, but stricter (parking is defined as leaving your vehicle or letting it stand longer than three minutes whereas this signs ...


47

Travelling with a firearm (in general) I've actually seen this scenario, where there has been an assumption by the (US) traveller that they would just be able to enter another country with their firearm. However, as @Mark Mayo states, each country has their own laws in this regard. It's important to realise other countries are likely to have much stricter ...


44

According to the 1961 Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness, Article 3: For the purpose of assigning nationality, birth on a ship or aircraft shall amount to birth in the territory of the State that gives its flag to that ship or aircraft. However, only about 40 nations (not including the USA) have ratified this convention - and what ...


43

Generally speaking, "yes". A BA aircraft is registered in the UK and therefore is covered by the UK laws. Under the UK law it's an offence not to obey the order of the flight crew while on the aircraft. Specifically, this is covered by the Air navigation order 2009, section 142(c): A person must not while in an aircraft ... (c) intentionally interfere ...


42

Given that some airlines even give you a complimentary pyjama when flying in first class I'd say that it would be perfectly legal for you to wear one on the plane regardless of which class you're flying in. Worst case scenario you'll get some looks from other passengers. Go ahead and fly comfortable.


41

Getting stopped for going only 5 MPH over is unlikely anywhere in the US. Of course it can still happen if something else is suspicious, e.g. very dark tinted windows (which may also be illegal), a very unusual looking vehicle, etc. 5 MPH over could be a discrepancy in measurement equipment, and officers do not want to go to court to explain when and how ...


41

Yes, they almost certainly do know you've left. The US processes passport details for all air passengers through a system called APIS, and ties that to the electronic I-94 (arrival and departure record). You can check your US arrival and departure history online. This allows you to verify their record of your departure.


39

It is indeed a (national) collector's coin. It is legal tender in the country where it was issued, but not elsewhere in the eurozone. Even in its country of origin, I could imagine that many people would be surprised to receive one or perhaps even refuse to believe that it is genuine. And looking at the photos you can find on the web, I must say that their ...


38

Here how it goes: After you pass the passport control desk, you will pass the customs desk. The guys at the customs desk will scan the luggage, if they found books or CDs they might ask you to show them. If they do not like them from the cover, they will take the books and/or CDs and give you a slip. The books will be sent to a department where they will ...


37

Sure you can. Just go to the right gun show. Selling guns is hard for private citizens so they can skip all that background check foolishness. We've been unable to close the gunshow loophole in spite of discovering documents from Al Qaeda advising cell members to purchase weapons at gun shows. It's not legal of course but clearly no one's interested in being ...


35

Very simply, no, they can not. In order to purchase a firearm in the US you must be a resident of the state in which you are buying it, and able to prove that residency. As a tourist is not a resident of the state, they are unable to purchase firearms. There was previously an additional requirement that non-citizens had to have been a resident of a state ...


34

Missing pages generally invalidate a passport. Depending on how cleanly they were removed, a casual inspection might not notice, but if noticed, you will at the very least be in for some heavy questioning, and may be denied boarding/entry. Applying for a new passport is strongly advisable.


33

In New York you definitely MAY be pulled over for exceeding the speed limit at all. In other words, if a cop wants to pull you over (to fulfill a ticket quota etc) he can use the fact that you exceeded the speed limit by 1 mph. Now, having driven across the United States, I would have two observations which may illuminate how cops decide whether or not to ...


33

TL;DR: It's complicated, but in practice, yes, building snowmen is still allowed for everybody. A fatwa is not a law, it's a ruling by an Islamic scholar that's technically only binding on the person who issued it, not all Muslims in Saudi Arabia, much less all people there. This particular fatwa does not appear to originate from the Permanent Committee, ...


32

Very simple: From the US State Department Website last sentence. A federal or state law enforcement agency may request the denial of a passport on several regulatory grounds under 22 CFR 51.70 and 51.72. The principal law enforcement reasons for passport denial are a federal warrant of arrest, a federal or state criminal court order, a condition of ...


31

As an Iranian I can tell you that breast-feeding in public is NOT a crime (at least in Iran) and you don't need to expect any severe consequences for this. Mothers do feed their children here whenever/wherever needed and it's none of anybody's business to question them why they are feeding their children. It's however usually a good practice for breasts to ...


31

Certainly not. As a foreigner who lived in the UK for four years, I definitely only needed my passport for international travel. I used my New Zealand photo driver's license initially for ID (eg, to get into a bar), and then my UK one. For opening bank accounts and others where you sometimes require two forms, then you bring your passport. The UK is not ...


30

Tickets get checked once in a while, usually by people with nondescript clothes waiting for passengers exiting the platforms or getting into the carriage and revealing themselves as ticket inspectors once the doors close and the train is on the move. Happened to me once or twice when working in Berlin and commuting by public transport for 6+ months a few ...


29

It'll depend on what you write, who you get at the border, and what else you do. For example, I've seen a person not have a hotel when they arrived at US Customs. He literally turned and asked anyone behind in the queue if they know the address of a hotel, and someone named the one from Pretty Woman on Rodeo Drive. So he wrote that in, and handed it to the ...


29

Offically the answer seems to be yes. There's no mention of bullet proof vests (or any item of clothing) on the BA information page or restricted items document. Equally there's no mention in the Heathrow restricted items page. However, I can see a great many practical problems that may be thrown in your way. Aside from the discomfort and inconvenience of ...


28

The contents of the main page in a passport is dictated by standards set by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), specifically the Machine Readable Travel Documents standard (Doc 9303). This document states that all passport photos should meet the following requirements: Pose 1.1. The photograph should be less than six months old. ...



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