Hot answers tagged

105

You don't have to be too worried about it, since the aircraft is able to cope with this. People are instructed to turn them off in order to avoid some disturbances and parasite noise in the communication between the pilot and the airport. As electronic devices using radio frequencies, they could also in theory cause some troubles to some aircraft equipment's ...


69

As a cabin crew member for long time, I can tell you that your responsibility ends by notifying a crew member, that's it. Let the crew members deal with it. This is true for all other violations, unless it's a life threatening situation that cannot wait, for example fire! Grab the extinguisher and fight the fire. But that's a whole different issue. ...


32

I am a software engineer and I also test the software on many different smartphones and tablets. I fly frequently within Europe, so my answer will be limited to this area. However, this is also from west to east and east to west, outside of the Schengen region! As a Dutch citizen, I rarely need a visa to travel, which makes this easy. I do carry a lot of ...


26

A few years ago I read a study about cell phone usage on U.S. domestic flights. Using RF locating equipment, they determined that the average U.S. flight has 2-3 cellphones left transmitting during the flight. Unconfirmed pilot anecdotes notwithstanding, if there were any significant risk of planes malfunctioning from cellphones, they would be falling out ...


23

Your personal safety is not affected by your fellow passenger using a cellphone. In the US, the FCC (not the FAA!) has limited use of cellphones on aircraft because of the potential effect on cell towers on the ground. From an empirical standpoint, if there was a significant risk, it would have been observed many times by now as people frequently leave ...


17

There are three concerns: 1) terrorism; 2) export/import limitations; and 3) the fire hazard from the lithium contained in the cell phone and laptop batteries. Terrorism: the difficulty of addressing terrorism is that the level of screening and scrutiny is often arbitrary depending on the current political climate and the capriciousness of the security ...


15

I didn't know until I started working in the field, but the most serious problem with leaving your cellphone on is the frequent failed attempts to connect to the many cell towers you are passing over at 500 mph. Not only does this tie up the towers' ability to connect with other people, it drains your handset battery faster.


13

HMPO have now included a little note along with the passport that says "the label on the back of your passport was used during the production process and can now be removed".


12

My father's an airline pilot (United Airlines) and this is something that I've asked him about at length. The idea that any kind of signal from your cellphone can interfere with a plane's electronics is purely myth (Though one that the airlines are happy to allow to propagate). There're endless such signals in the air at all times anyways, and modern ...


9

Assuming this is a serious question, the answer is there is a very small risk, much less than most other places in the world. A single incident has no effect on the overall security, only on the public perception, mostly of people that like to follow hypes and panics. After every school shooting in the US, the same question comes up, and of course makes no ...


6

Note that while EMI concerns are practically bogus considering modern airplanes and mobile phones, you are still required to turn off all electronics during takeoff and landing, for your own safety. In case your airplane has to make an RTO maneuver or catches fire, you won't see it coming if you're concentrated on your phone or laptop. You may get hurt ...


6

I am going to give you a different take on this question. It is in your question (customs) and seems to be overlooked in most answers. It is not really about planes, batteries, safety, or how big your bag is, it is mostly about the law of the departure and destination countries (not usually transit countries). Many countries prohibit what you can bring in ...


6

I'd suggest you follow the saying "when in Rome do as the Romans do". In other words, arrive to the beach fully clothed and look around to see what others are wearing. Then adapt. The customs are likely to vary depending on the region, the city and even the beach itself. Generally speaking though, the consensus on the internet seems to be that bikinis are ...


5

When I sent my minor children abroad alone, I always gave them notarized letters of consent. No official at any American or European border ever asked to see any documentation beyond their passport. I would treat this situation as the girl traveling alone -- having an adult "with her" in some official capacity would make the situation more complicated -- ...


4

I'm also an analog photographer and I develop my film myself. There's a few things you can do and as with anything it depends more on how you ask, but it's worth remembering that just like in your example if you hit a stubborn official somewhere there really is no way to go around scanning the film. It also helps to know exactly how many scans will start ...


4

As far as legality of self-defence is concerned, German law applies on German territory regardless of whether you're a German citizen, a refugee, or a tourist, and nowhere else does the code refer specifically to citizens or non-citizens. Section 3 Offences committed on the territory of the Federal Republic of Germany German criminal law shall ...


4

Actually, an Arab woman travelling alone in Germany might face greater danger than a Westerner woman travelling alone there, if we're talking about hate crimes. Nonetheless, this does not mean that all German people are bad, not even a small percentage of them, not even 0.00001%. It's an individual thing, if one person did it, he/she is only representing ...


3

No, this seems to have changed. Apparently your trucks could be weaponised. Checked luggage is rarely stolen, the bigger risk seems to be it going to the wrong airport. If you're worried about theft wrap your bag properly so it's more hassle than it is worth. People who steal normally are more interested in macbooks and other such luxuries


3

Your Safety is Compromised if You’re an Intervener If you feel compelled to do something about someone 'breaking the rules' you may want to consider why it's so important for others to follow them. Primarily, if you find yourself wanting to intervene and play Sherriff you may find yourself in a compromising position if the person you are trying to ...


3

The consensus on the internet is mixed, with people who managed to carry their soldering iron in hand luggage without any problems, as well as others who had it confiscated and thrown away by TSA. However, the TSA prohibited items search engine does not provide any indication on the topic. The only US-related official source I could find is the Delta ...


3

Resting Tired Travellers vs Free Campers Roadside rest areas are intended for tired travellers and not for campers. Indeed most of them are signposted with "no camping" signs, as are most urban and suburban parking areas. Some rest areas allow overnight stays, and the longest one can stay is 24-hours. The thin line between a tired traveller and a camper ...


3

Although camping in Byron Bay and surrounding suburban areas is not permitted, if you head north of Byron Bay along the Pacific highway there are numerous free parking spots. One of them is the Yelgun rest area. There is also one about 5 minutes north of the Byron turn off. If you go further north, you can also find the Sleepy Hollow rest area even further ...


2

I am sharing with you a link to the official website that contains some contact numbers : Contact details for electronic tickets handling. You can call the number and explain the situation. Hopefully, someone will take it into consideration and provide guidance. You might not be successful upfront so if you don't get a satisfactory answer during your first ...


2

Regarding the last part of the question: Gun ownership requires a permit. The most common of those allows the owner to carry an unloaded gun in a locked case to and from a licensed shooting range. When not training, the gun must be kept in a safe. It is possible for tourists to bring a gun for hunting or sporting use. This requires a permit as well, like ...


2

Sure. Join the spy agency of your country, and they will issue you another passport with altered details for your work. If you only want to change your age, join the Chinese gymnastics team. If you have documents to prove that you have another legal name, or that the details on an existing passport are wrong, you should be able to have a passport reissued. ...


1

It is largely dependent on where you are. In general, the US take a more relaxed approach to skateboards and do allow these to be brought onto flights as carry-on. However many airports in the EU see the skateboard as a "blunt instrument" and don't allow them regardless of the stance of the airline. See this article: Can You Take a Skateboard Onto an ...


1

As pointed out in the answers given so far, a few mobile phones are not going to cause problems. We then have a few 100 milliwatt transmitting power on frequencies that are totally different from what the plane uses to communicate with ATC, and all equipment used by the plane are well shielded from EMF interference, so it looks like we can just allow ...


1

Knives, and similar items that might be used as weapons but are not a danger to the aircraft, can be carried in checked baggage. Check with your airline if you are in doubt. For customs purposes a cooking knife won't be treated any differently from anything else. As long as you are not importing it you won't be charged import duty. Some countries have ...


1

Morocco a very safe place, I visited many times, and I love it. It's one of the more "European" country in North Africa. Then just respect another culture with some natural rules, you have to be careful to your clothes mainly when you are going to visit religious places. You can travel without any hassle to about all the main point of interest. Marrakech, ...


1

This answer is for my assumption that you want to go camping on your own/with friends (without guides and porters), and this comes from someone who has camped and hitchhiked a lot in a country where relatively very few people do so. 1) Camping in national parks is strictly illegal unless done in a designated campsite after paying authorities. If caught ...



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