Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

50

I have met the "fruit sniffing" dog several times and am aware (from watching Border Security) of currency-sniffing and firearms-sniffing dogs in addition to the classic drug-sniffers. Generally, these dogs sniff people's bags more than people. (The Canadian beagle that met my flight from the Caribbean once sat [the dog's signal] about my bag, but the ...


13

Most countries will consider a damaged passport invalid and require it to be replaced. For instance, the United States says: If your passport has been significantly damaged, especially the book cover or the page displaying your personal data and photo, you will need to apply for a new passport. Conditions that may constitute damage requiring you to ...


10

I've worked in the hospitality industry for 18 years in the United States so I can answer this with some knowledge. Most states require a hotel to post their "Maximum Possible Rate" on the back of the guest room door. This is to keep a hotel from "price gouging" in the event of a natural disaster or even from discriminatory practices, (charging someone of a ...


10

No. Not legally. Passport retention is against the law in UAE. Your passport is usually the property of the government that issued it (as mentioned in the small print in your passport, which usually contains words to that effect), and each passport holder is responsible for its safekeeping. Source (I'm aware that the source's page title refers to ...


9

Reservations are semi-autonomous lands. They have their own rules, law enforcement officiers and judicial systems. But that said, their laws are not really that different than the state they reside in. They are often more strict on enforcement, so obey the speed limits and other driving rules, don't count on the 10 miles over the limit grace a state ...


6

There are no specific regulations against taking photos during take off and landing - as long as you are not endangering the crew and passengers. Each airline, however is free to have their own policies. For example some will not allow cameras with external battery packs. For more detailed discussion on this, check out this post on photo.stackexchange.com. ...


6

The general consensus on the internet seems to be that the sticker is an RFID chip used by Identity and Passport Service (IPS) to track the production process of the passport from start to shipping. There are many such questions disseminated across the web (here, here and here are a few examples). Most mention stories of people traveling with and without the ...


6

It's a document you would get from a research institution if you are coming there for a few weeks to do research. It's not unusual for a professor or young researcher to go for a short time to another institution to exchange ideas, work on an empirical study or write a paper. If they stay for less than 90 days, they would not get a long-stay visa but this ...


6

If you are not a citizen, you can refuse to answer stupid questions, provided you don't mind being denied entry, flown home immediately at your own expense, and possibly having a much lower chance of being able to enter in the future. Otherwise, you need to answer the questions; countries are generally under no obligation to admit non-citizens (EU stuff ...


5

Getting sniffed by a dog is not prohibited in Islam. See this if you want the relevant discussion. In fact, dogs can be kept as pets as long as they are for defence, herding etc. and not as recreational animals. You may also want to post this separately in islam.stackexchange.com. Even if you ignore the above - dogs at airports don't sniff people, they ...


4

Presuming you are a non-Indian (not a member of that reservation, nor a different tribe) they only have limited jurisdiction over you. Most Indian reservation police have cross-agreements with the state cops to allow outside cops (such as pulling over a car on the interstate traveling through reservation lands) to operate normally, or to hold you till the ...


3

I know that different Muslims interpret the rules around dogs slightly differently, and I am not a scholar of Islam, but there is one piece of pragmatic advice I can contribute here. I understand that many Muslims believe that if a dog touches your clothes, it is forbidden to pray in those clothes until they have been washed three times. This can be very ...


3

I lived in that zone for three years (1993-1996), and I have traveled in it several times more recently, but this is the first I have ever heard of its existence. How did you even become aware of it? I lived in Lexington, VA, and my travels have been mainly on the Blue Ridge and in the Shenandoah and James River valleys. I can't speak for areas closer to ...


3

According to this site indeed scuba diving in Turkey is heavily regulated. There's an organisation called TSSF which defines rules and regulations for scuba diving. According to the linked site, the limit for > 18yo CMAS 2* and above is indeed 30m: Here a short summary of what is of interest for everybody. Foreigners are not allowed to dive in ...


2

It isn't really the airline's decision to choose which travel document you travel on. Yes, we all know for instance that you should enter the USA on the US passport (by law—if you have one), but should you enter the UK on your US passport or your Greek passport? The document you use will depend on the purpose of your visit, and your own circumstances. And ...


2

The countries that do not allow dual citizenship are very many more than just China and showing passports indicating two nationalities to an official of one of these may get the holder into trouble. Even where dual citizenship is not an issue, an entry stamp in one passport and an exit one in another may be inconvenient.


2

At the end of the day it is your responsibility to make sure that you have the required Visas/etc for the country you are travelling to. However it is the airlines responsibility to check that you at least appear to meet the required entry requirements, which would include having a visa for the country, or a passport from a country that does not require a ...


2

There can be and are some legal differences between laws and traffic regulations in reservations and out of them. Example from Montana. Those are however minor. In the US there are also variations between states, but all the time masses of tourists cross state lines without knowing the ins and outs of the traffic laws applying to all the states they are ...


2

What's the CDWS? The Chamber of Diving and Water Sports is a govermental organisation funded in 2007 by the Egyptian Mynistry of Tourism, whose purpose is to regulate all diving and water sports activities in the country. Quoting from the CDWS About Us webpage: The Chamber of Diving and Watersports was founded by Egypt’s Ministry of Tourism in 2007 with ...


2

That snippet you provided refers to time behind bars - in jail - in any case write to your local Australian embassy or consulate in the UK for advice.


2

I'm fairly certain that that clause is talking about actual criminal convictions which you went to trial for and served (or were on probation for) a 12+ month sentence. However, going to Australia is a long trip, and I've seen people turned back at the airport before. I would suggest that you write a letter / send an e-mail to the Australian Consulate to ...


2

This is a guess rather than something I know, but it may be worth checking if it's possible to request to be searched by means other than a sniffer dog. They may be willing to have a human (or maybe even trained bees) search you instead.


1

There's a reasonably decent American mystery novel that features a courtroom scene with the defense attorney asking the Court to weigh the evidence. (The defendant is charged with smuggling.) The judge replies that he always weighs the evidence, but the attorney means literally. Without the drugs, it matches the weight on the checked baggage receipt. With ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible