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13

In short, no, he can't realistically bring them on board: under TSA rules, semi-solid foods are considered "gels" and thus fall under the "liquids, aerosols and gels" restriction of 3 bottles x 100 ml max, and these rules are applied worldwide on international flights. You could still probably bring a few tiny containers of curry and something dry to eat ...


5

¥20,000 cash, plus a credit card, is lots for an overnight and a transit to Narita (I live in Tokyo). Where you are from and what you look like is usually a much bigger factor with Japanese immigration than how much cash you have - in 15 years of travel they have yet to ask me a single question at immigration. FYI, you won't be able to do much in Tokyo. ...


4

Usually the problem isn't getting back out of the country, but getting in (there are exceptions to this, such as countries where exit visas are required). According to the Consulate General of the Kingdom of Morocco in New York, citizens of the USA do not need a visa to visit Morocco for a stay up to 90 days. This would allow you to leave the airport during ...


3

Firstly, go and read this answer to understand the difference between a "layover" and a "stopover". For international flights, breaks between flights of up to 24 hours are generally considered layovers (although the exact rules vary from airline to airline), and thus are generally not charged extra. Anything over 24 hours in a location is a stop-over, and ...


2

The point of the 'sufficient funds' test is to see if you will risk getting into financial strife during your time in the country. Many countries test this, and there's no hard or fast rule for how much cash you'll need. When considering your access to funds, the officer will take a number of factors into account: how much money you have access to how ...


2

This is called a stopover and should be no problem. You might need to pay a little more or use more expensive fares to be able to do it. Concretely, if you are not going through a travel agent, you need to book your travel as a “multi-city” trip on the airline's website. If you book it that way (and not as several one-way trips), it will be a single ticket, ...


1

I've been to Japan many times and have never been asked anything like this. In any case, in the extremely rare chance that they do say something, a copy of your flight itinerary (which shows you're leaving Japan the next morning) and your 20,000 Yen should be totally fine. Where are you staying? If you are staying with a friend, make sure you know their ...



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