Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

16

Success! Five hours proved to be plenty of time to escape Schipol for an enjoyable Saturday evening in the city before returning to the airport to catch our flight to the UK. We stashed our carry-on luggage in the lockers located at the airport near the airport train station. A "medium" (actually quite large) locker is € 6 for 24 hours. The freedom to ...


15

There are two issues here: what people mean, and what airlines mean. Airlines vary, but generally they mean layover to mean you changing planes for their reasons. They don't fly from London to Venice, for example, so they fly you London to Frankfurt then Frankfurt to Venice. You might have an hour or two in the airport to change planes. They mean stopover ...


15

In general, no. If you book a ticket that includes some time in a city along the way, it's up to you to figure out where to sleep and to pay for that. Two exceptions. First, if you had a short connection, say two hours, and there's a problem that delays the second flight and you have to spend the night there, the airline might (might!) pay for a hotel. ...


14

Getting in to Manhattan and back during peak traffic hours is a lost cause and you'll have to settle for the airport lounge or something less exotic. JFK is a scant stone's throw from the Boardwalk on Rockaway Beach however. While it does not have a Tiffany's or a Times Square, it might do as a bit of 'niche Americana'. It's a civilized locale with ...


13

In short, no, he can't realistically bring them on board: under TSA rules, semi-solid foods are considered "gels" and thus fall under the "liquids, aerosols and gels" restriction of 3 bottles x 100 ml max, and these rules are applied worldwide on international flights. You could still probably bring a few tiny containers of curry and something dry to eat ...


12

TL;DR: While it probably would be possible for you to get downtown, see one or two things and get back, I would recommend settling in with a good book/iPad/kindle and get some movie watching/reading done. O'Hare is a terrible place to get in and out of. I imagine I'll leave the airport by 9, and should be back by 11:30. Is this reasonable? Assuming ...


12

You could take the Floating Dutchman, but then there is no dinner included. If you would really like to go for a bite, I would recommend going to the Nieuwmarkt/Zeedijk. There are quite some nice restaurants there. The zeedijk start right at the central station, and the nieuwmarkt is at the end of this zeedijk. Given the short time you have, you should ...


12

Definitely, more than 2 hours. I actually have such a connection quite regularly, and always spend some time in the city. Wouldn't go to museums and such though, but enough for some general site-seeing and even maybe some shopping on Oxford Street. You could probably squeeze in a whole round-trip on the tour buses they have there, without getting out ...


11

Given this is a travel forum, the airline terminology is the best one. A layover refers to a break between two flights taking you to your destination. Normally this would be short (a few hours), but the definition will vary depending on the airline and the route. A stopover is where you actually break your your journey at a point that isn't the destination ...


11

I'm not sure about the visa part, but about the time: By the cheapest train I seem to recall Narita airport is about two hours from Tokyo. Also you might well have to be back at the airport at least one hour before boarding, and quite possibly more. And the train system in Japan is notoriously complex. It will be very easy to get a bit lost and miss your ...


11

Is visiting San Francisco viable in 5.5 hours? Only to do a drive through and not a very thorough one. Let's assume that you have your bags checked all the way through the destination and let's further assume that flights will be on time and let's even further assume that there is no traffic going to and from the airport. Under these circumstances it ...


11

A visit to the beach is certainly possible. In fact, LAX itself is situated on the coast, but the roads from the terminals are on the inland side, making it a bleak 5 mile/8km walk one-way to Playa Del Rey— and I would not recommend either the activity or the destination. Keep these things in mind: The U.S. does not have outbound passport control, but as ...


10

For virtually all international airports, as long as you are on a single itinerary with your bags booked through, you will stay in the transit area and do not need to clear immigration or Customs. However, if you purchased separate tickets for the two legs, this does not apply: you will need to pass through Immigration (which may require visas etc), collect ...


10

First, make sure you are allowed to leave the airport with your passport/visa. Visa on arrival is available for many countries, but costs US$28 for 30 days. But that's only certain countries, other ones are more complicated. Wikitravel is limited, but suggests the following sites: The Museum of Islamic Art, Doha Souq Waqif : the traditional old ...


10

Um. You might want to start by investing in a guidebook or at least flicking through Wikivoyage Dubai. The airport and the "city" (such as it is, Dubai is hugely sprawling) are most definitely not within walking distance; however, they are connected by the Dubai Metro, which will whisk you there in a few minutes. The only bit of the city that is really ...


10

Most US airports have no concept of "transit" and no "airside" where you can make your connection. You land, clear US customs, and then can go wherever you like, whether that's just over to another terminal to catch your plane, or out into the city to explore. So if you have the paperwork to enable the connection, then you almost certainly have the paperwork ...


9

I landed in terminal 3 and flew out of terminal 1 last year. I didn't have to leave the airside because Terminals 1 and 3 are joined. It took me about 20 minutes to walk from the Costa stand at the far end of terminal 3 to my gate in terminal 1 which was maybe half way down that terminal. So assuming your inbound flight arrives on time and you can walk for ...


9

As jpatokal said, Dubai is a bit of a sprawling mess, and not much of a walkable city. Depending on your budget, you'd be best served taking cabs from place to place, especially if you're only there for a day. Having spent a day or two there myself in 2010, I'd say the following were highlights: Visit the souk, especially the gold portion to see all the ...


9

Assuming you arrive in the domestic terminal and leave from the international one, I would first go over there and try to check in early, just to get that out of the way. It is always risky to leave the airport and get into suburban traffic when you have to catch another flight, especially an international one. Your time is limited and I wouldn't spend too ...


9

The primeclass CIP Lounge allows paid access for what appears to be 30 Euro. Access is also available via PriorityPass. It's a long time since I've been in that specific lounge, but I seem to remember that it was one of the nicer airport lounges I've visited. There is also a hotel which offers both airside and landside rooms. If you have the ability to go ...


9

Presuming you are arriving from a non-Schengen country then you will not need to pass through immigration in Munich. You will remain air-side, although you may need to go through security depending on which terminal you arrive in/depart from. However even if you do need to clear immigration in Munich you'll find it very quick and easy (presuming you come ...


9

For international flights, the magic number is usually (but not always) 24 hours. If your flights are less than 24 hours apart, it's a "transit" or a "layover" and it's free; if it's over 24 hours, it's usually "stopover" and you may need to pay extra. Note that these terms are not always used consistently and it's not always 24 hours; I've seen up to 72 ...


8

For the visa part, the rules are (from Timaticweb): Visitors continuing their journey to a third country within 72 hours can obtain a Shore Pass/Transit Pass on arrival, provided: being able to prove to Japanese immigration that Shore/Transit Pass will be appropriately used; and departing from the same airport of arrival; or departing from ...


8

It appears that the minimum connecting time according to the airlines is 40 or 45 minutes between Terminal A & C, so you should be just fine. If you're flying United, they run a transfer shuttle between Terminals A & C inside security, so you don't have to go through security again.


8

Are your segments on the same ticket, or separate? If the latter, I would not risk it. You would have no protections if you miss the connection; all other flights may be sold out or you might need to purchase a new ticket at full price. I do not know how Delta is about LGA these days since the slot swap with US Airways, but in the past they rather ...


8

From the airport to the city center you can go by: taxi (quite expensive) bus (takes 35 minutes) In both cases, having to wait 5 hours you'll have plenty of time for a quick visit of the city center. From the train station (nice building) the senate square (with the Luteran cathedral and the university), the Esplanade and the market square are all within ...


8

If you don't have access to frequent traveller lounges, and you don't want to sleep in a chair, you can buy a ticket for one of the day rooms offered by the airport, which will cost you CHF84. sleepinginairports.com also recommends the Starbucks at the airport, if you don't really need a bed. In the city, which is easily reached by public transport, the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible