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13

If this is the border crossing I'm looking at on Google Maps right now, it looks like it does indeed have an office. The town on the Lao side is Ban Pangmong while on the Thai side is Ban Huak on Route 1093. No visible signs in English would seem to suggest a negative but notice the photo is from January 2013: Link to Google Maps But I finally found ...


10

Yes, it is possible to hire motorbikes in Bangkok and Chiang Mai. I haven't done this myself but some friends did. It costs about 200-800 baht per day to hire one depending on the type of motorcycle you get. It might make sense to buy one from an expat or a another traveller, then sell it when (if?) you go back to Thailand. You will definitely need to have ...


10

I would personally advise against it, unless you plan on staying there for a long time and are trying to get used to it. I found a UN report about water quality in Laos. You should read it for yourself to get the details, but here in short: Most water sources/wells seem to pose a health risk. There is little contamination with chemicals and the like, so ...


10

You can ONLY enter Thailand at an international border crossing. If you cross anywhere else you will be in Thailand illegally. When you try to depart you will likely be arrested, charged and deported, not the kind of thing you wanted noted in your passport. The fact that you qualify for a 15 day visa waiver entry does not allow you to bypass entry ...


9

It seems that it needs a full page, I figured this out by searching for Laos visa photos in google. It always showed a full page visa except for older visas where it was a stamp. I guess you will end up with two empty pages :)


9

On top of what has been written by @toy and @user34936, which I can support 100%, I would like to give you the following advice: When traveling to remoter areas in Asia (I would count Laos into that), and specially if you do not do so frequently (several times a year), you are risking to get Diarrhea as a minimum and intestinal parasites as a worst case ...


9

The Lao Myanmar Friendship Bridge opened back in May, connecting Luang Namtha Province in Laos to Talicheck District in Myanmar. One of its initial purposes was to increase tourism, but I have seen nothing that confirms foreigners are able to cross yet. Perhaps when ASEAN kicks in in 2016 it will become an open entry point for foreigners, but right now it ...


8

Well according to Wikitravel: The nearest Cambodian town is Stung Treng, and the border is a 90-minute speedboat or bus ride away. Note that the border is lightly used, with almost no onward public transport available at the border (therefore book through transport from Stung Treng to Ban Nakasang for Si Phan Don/Don Det) and both customs officers and ...


8

Recently while planning my trip to Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam, I did a little research: I am not sure about direct buses from Siem Reap. However, Stueng Traeng is about 5 hours. From there, you can get a mini bus connection to Pakse. This takes about another 5 hours. From Pakse it is an overnight sleeper to Vientiane. If you have time, it is advisable to ...


8

For Laos, Canadian citizens require a Single Entry visa, valid for up to 60 days. Cambodia you require a single entry visa, valid for 90 days. However, in both cases, while they're valid for 60 and 90 days respectively, this is just the period after application during which you enter, and you can only actually stay in each country for 30 days, or when ...


7

According to laos-guide-999.com: If you don't have photos you will be asked to pay a small fee (few dollars) for scanning your photograph from your passport, and placing it onto your visa application form. Another opinion from wikitravel: passport photo is/may be required (although you may be able to pay a US$1 "fee" to have this requirement ...


7

Milk is available at the only two supermarkets I've been able to find in Vientiane and from the local convenience store chain, M-Point Mart. There were one and two litre plastic bottles of regular and skim milk and one litre cartons of UHT milk. All the milk seemed to have Thai labels, not Lao (though one of the companies is a Japanese company). This means ...


6

Judging by the cost of living charts for Laos, milk is not particularly expensive, indicating it's probably not hard to find and not rare, even if a lot of the locals are lactose-intolerant, it's readily available in supermarkets. Evidence of this is found in a blog about this very topic where they indicate that certainly in Vientiane, milk is available in ...


6

Mark's answer covers most parts so I'll throw in a couple of notes from my experience: The on-arrival visa is a single-entry visa; the same visa won't allow you to get back from Laos. You could get an ordinary visa or a business visa (the type 'E' that Mark refers to) but by default these are single entry, and you need to get an extension to get multiple ...


6

Another option would be to go through Thailand, take a bus from Pakse to Ubon Ratchathani (3 hours leaving 7:30 am). From there take a bus to Surin running on highway 24, there may be a train (3 hours) as well. From Surin you can take a swangthaew or minibus to the Cambodian border at Chong Jom (2-3 hours). 16 km south of the border is Along Veng but ...


6

I think you were disappointed because the most famous Lao dishes have become popular in Thailand and a lot of the food you find in Laos without a local to help isn't really Lao food but Thai, Vietnamese, Chinese, and French food. The most famous Lao dishes have to be larb and green papaya salad. I never saw these on offer in non-touristy Surat Thani in ...


6

It's not safe to drink from the tap in those areas, Laos, Thailand, etc. If possible please ask for bottled water. You might not get sick immediately as you will of some parts in India but it's not safe.


6

Will you need visas? Yes Based on hippietrail's great comment, here's the breakdown: Canadian: Fiji: No visa Indonesia: Visa on Arrival (VOA) Thailand: No visa (expect to get entry stamps in your passports) Cambodia: VOA Laos: VOA Vietnam: Visa required before entry (or pre-approval, read below) Swede (same requirements as Canada for these countries): ...


6

On the website of the Lao embassy in Paris, you can find on the download page a document on the entry points into Laos. On this document, you can see for each entry point whether it delivers visas ("Visa à l’arrivée"). For the border post of Phou Kue (Attapeu)/ Beu Y (Quangtoum), the document says it delivers visas on arrival. This seems authoritative, but ...


6

YES. I got one there yesterday afternoon between about 4.30pm and 5pm. There were no extra fees or bribes over the standard fee which, for an Australian, was $30. There were two forms, one large and one small. It was very quick as I was the only non-local. Everybody else crossing was Vietnamese and didn't need a visa. The line getting out of Vietnam was ...


5

You can go camping in the Phou Khao Khouay national park north of Vientiane. In the Nah Ha park, you can stay in some bamboo huts. There is also a campsite at the Tad Leuk Waterfalls. I am sure there are more. So to answer that part of your question, there are campsites. Sleeping outside in an unprotected area by yourself can be tricky by the way since ...


5

Given the proximity to Thailand, and the migration between the two populaces, as well as cultural migration, there's always going to be some crossover. Wikipedia actually has a page on Lao cuisine. It notes the most famous Lao dish would be Larb (ລາບ) - "a spicy mixture of marinated meat and/or fish that is sometimes raw (prepared like ceviche) with a ...


5

Indeed as Doc says, it was Wat Sok Pa Luang, more commonly written as Wat Sokpaluang or, in Lao, "ວັດໂສກປ່າຫຼວງ". Sokpaluang is also the name of the suburb or region of Vientiane where it's located. The Wat is apparently also known as "The Jungle Temple". Sadly, in answer to the part of your question If it still exists? and according to reviewers on ...


5

Sounds like you're referring to 'Wat Sok Pa Luang'. I haven't been, but a few of the people I was traveling with in Laos did go and seemed to enjoy it. Any of the local taxi or tuk-tuk drivers will know how to get there. I don't recall the price, but I'm sure now that you know the name Google will be able to give you no end of information on it.


5

I think that your problem here would be that you can't provide proof of income (to show you'd be able to support yourself for a year) without tipping them off that you would be working there but not paying income tax (since your company is not located in Laos and therefore your income taxes would go back to France rather than stay in Laos). Therefore, it ...


5

The correct address appears to be : KM 3, Thadeua Road Watnak Village Sisattanak District Vientiane This would place it very close to the ambassadors residence, and in the same vicinity as multiple other embassies, including Japan, India, Singapore and Australia (which is at KM4, Thadeua Road). If you get stuck, I'm sure the staff at the Australia ...


5

As you are bringing a cycle and panniers, etc, you may find flying to be the cheapest and most convenient. Because Thailand is a popular destination for European tourists there are usually fare deals being offered. But there is no etched in stone cheapest routing, the fares vary from day to day and so you need to sit down and do some searching on the ...


5

Laos-Myanmar bridge awaits juristic acts Laos-Myanmar Friendship Bridge in Luang Namtha province in the northern parts of the country has yet to become an official international border as the juristic acts between the two countries have not been completed. Pending the completion of the requisite juristic acts to be passed, it has now opened as a ...


4

CNNGo has a piece on this as well, explaining about how it was done. It sounds like there was a major expose and resulting crackdown. Wikitravel's page on Vang Vieng also states that there's been a massive shutdown. However, the Sydney Morning Herald reports these attempts have had 'mixed success': But two days ago, the river was still busy with more ...


4

If you're going directly from Bangkok to Vietnam, shortest path is Bangkok-Nakhon Phanom/Thakek-Vinh (and then either north to Hanoi or south to Hue). Luang Prabang is definitely not on the way, Vientiane is quite a detour. For casual touring, one interesting route may be to go from Bangkok to north of Thailand, cross over the Mekhong to Laos in Chiang ...



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