Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

There are several textbooks of Mongolian for foreigners. Have you tried "Modern Mongolian: A Course Book" by Dr John Gaunt? It's very straightforward, pronunciation of every letter is compared to a similar sound of English words and the grammar explained clearly, not in complicated ways as some other books do. Sometimes they sell copies with audio tapes ...


2

When I was in Mongolia last summer, no one outside of UB spoke any language beyond Mongolian (and even in UB, it's pretty tough). However, you should note that the Mongolian alphabet is the same as the Russian one since that was imposed by the USSR back in the day, and has stuck since. + I agree with what @Tom said.


1

Summer 1990, a week in Tokyo. Palace tour guide: excellent English. Proprietor of small hotel in the Japanese Inn Group (which was at that time making special offers to foreign tourists), limited English. At a restaurant where we were befuddled by the buy-a-ticket from the machine and give to the cook system, one high school student with perfect English, ...


4

A small hint that I don't see in the other answers is that some fraction of the locals will be willing to write English for you but won't try to speak it. I suppose that they are embarrassed, but given the atrocious state of my Japanese I don't see how they had anything to be worried about. Still, some of them seemed to care. I made it a habit to always ...


1

Caveat: I've studied Japanese at the college level twice--when I was in my early 20s, and again when I was almost 40, for about 2 years each time. I finally made it to Japan in 2007. My reading knowledge allowed me to do a few things easier, make my way in train stations (but the big ones have English signs too), fill out a seat reservation form for the ...


1

I was in Tokyo for 10 days in 2007, used the public transportation to go around, I went for one day to the Fuji and one day for Kamakura. I had great difficulties to get things done. The only person who spoken good English was at the reception of my hostel in Tokyo. Otherwise, even the young ladies at the Tourist Information point at a big metro station ...


1

I cannot give specifics because of my bad memory, but in 2011 I made two one-week trips to Japan (Tokyo, Kyoto, Hiroshima, and a few places in between). I don't recall a single issue neither with food nor lodging nor transportation (although, admittedly, I'm kind of a loner). I don't know a single word in Japanese.


28

Qualifier: I live in Tokyo You will have no problems navigating the train system or shopping in tourist-specific areas like Asakusa. Beyond that, not that many people speak or understand English. Even getting lunch at McDonalds is difficult - I speak reasonable Japanese and they still get my order wrong nearly half the time. The locals are simply not used ...


14

In this I can only give my own experience but I think it is telling enough. I have traveled in Japan for most of a month in 1994, with no Japanese at all and traveling by train and hostels, using English as my native Dutch is not understood there at all. I had arranged my first week with a short tour Tokyo/Kyoto, but did the rest without any reservations ...


6

Partly depends on where you are going. In the bigger cities, at hotels, large department stores, bigger restaurants you may be able to get by just fine with English (though learning some basic Japanese - Hello, Thank You, How Much, How Are You, etc never hurts) In rural Japan you may have difficulty, especially with older Japanese shop owners, innkeepers ...



Top 50 recent answers are included