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I actually ended up buying the sim card from LEBARA on Amazon (I am not affiliated with the seller nor Lebara compary in any way). Despite what says on the package, you CAN activate it from outside of France. It was a rather easy procedure using the internet, you can also top up and buy some Internet and/or voice bundles on their website. There is an English ...


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Airport in Beijing is international. All signs used Chinese and English. Airport staff mostly able to speak English. Road from airport to city center will takes about 20 minutes on Airport Express. You will have enough time to make a small walk or get a delicious dinner. Near Dongzhimen station you can find a lot of good shopping centers. Airport Express ...


7

At Beijing Airport you will easily find your way around. All signs are bilingual (Chinese/English). You cannot really mis where you need to go. I cannot vouch for the staff, however. Forget visiting the city. If you have a 6-hours layover, you want to be back at the airport 2 hours before. Getting to the city center (i.e. Tiananmen Square) will take you at ...


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I can only agree on the above answers. Keep in mind that when you try to learn some Dutch words and address someone in Dutch, it is very likely that you get your answer in English. It is a matter of customs, not being rude or kind doing that. Used to work for a US company where alle the native English people went to Dutch class, where everyone but tweo ...


1

English is de-facto second language in the Netherlands, in the sense, that practically every child 10 years or older is able to communicate in it. One of the reasons for that can be the fact that English movies and TV programs are shown with subs and never dubbed (except programs for small kids). In Amsterdam and other tourist areas chances to get lost ...


4

I am going to make a bit of a controversial claim in this post, but from my experience working with a lot of expats in the Netherlands it can be considered quite true: The amount of Dutch you should learn depends entirely on whether you're from a 'western' country (western Europe, north America, Australia), or one of the countries the Dutch tend to look ...


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For a long time, Dutch TV-makers had no budget for voice-over translation, which gave many children from the '70s and '80s an early advantage over their counterparts in countries like Germany and Italy. That's still noticeable, although more and more English cartoons have been translated over the past few years. It's still very rare to find TV-shows and ...


3

I'm Dutch. A lot of people speak English but most people have a weird Dutch accent. There are also a lot of words which almost sound the same in both English as in Dutch (bier or beer). But with just English you should be able to make yourself clear to a lot of people. If you speak a bit of Dutch is nice but not required. Dutch is a very tough language to ...


6

In my personal experience, you will be fine with speaking English in Amsterdam. Most people will be able to understand you. However I do suggest you learn some key phrases, not out of necessity but out of respect. I think you will find that people are more willing to help you if they can see you are trying to speak their language then when you just assume ...


13

Not sure about the 90% figure but many people in the Netherlands know at least some English and they are very eager to speak it. Dutch people will often switch to English as soon as they sense you don't understand Dutch and I have never felt any annoyance about that (not a concern for you but even civil servants, the police, etc. will happily help you in ...


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English is widely spoken in Amsterdam, as well as other cities in the Netherlands, and you will have no problem navigating the city. Personally, I only know a few words of Dutch and I never had a problem in the city. You may want to bring a phrase book to help you with greetings and simple phrases. Dutch people, like any other cultures, appreciate when you ...


0

I believe that “thumb up” and “thumb down” works in most of the world. At least with people that have an incentive to understand you as you are spending money.


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Wikipedia lists only a few countries where nodding and shaking are reversed: Greece, Macedonia, Bulgaria and Albania. As a Bulgarian, I can tell you it can be quite confusing for foreigners: I've been living abroad for the last seven years or so, and in the beginning I caught a few puzzled looks when nodding or shaking: my mouth says one thing, but my head ...


4

I had to do the same thing. I just walked into a couple of cell phone stores in Paris - Vodafone etc and asked a young person (many of them speak English) for a prepaid SIM card that included 1GB of data. Ask them to set it up for you. English wasn't perfect but it worked. 99% of international airports have cell phone stores and more often than not have ...



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