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39

I find several things help, some are physical or physiological while others are purely mental: I find it easier to adjust to "it's morning, get up now!" - as you get when you fly east - if I get light on my face as soon as possible. On the plane, open your shade, eat the "breakfast" they give you, and do the things you do in the morning. In a hotel, get ...


24

And we introduce Mark's patent-pending method to surviving the hell that is NZ to London superhaul economy class travel: Prepare your entertainment. Sure, you will likely have movies on the plane. But I've done several 10-13 hour trips with broken screens or no entertainment system - SINCE 2010. Don't bet on having it. Charge laptop batteries, iPads, ...


20

Addition to Mark's answer : Don't look at the time during the flight You can't do anything about it and the flight will feel a lot longer if you keep looking at the time. Don't check your watch regularly and avoid looking at the in-flight map showing the current position of the plane. Bring your own headphones. The headphones available on the plane ...


14

I usually don't suffer from jetlag if it is possible to stretch the previous day, so that you go to sleep really tired (even though it is a weird time for you to go to sleep). In general it is easier to adapt when travelling west, because it is always easier to stay awake a few more hours in the evening (have a drink, etc.). When travelling east, I prefer to ...


11

For the scientifically minded, this is well documented in medical research. Take a look at this article for a lot of info. Their recommended procedure is shown in this figure. The basic points: No miracle cure: your body adjusts slowly, and aggressive tactics to shift by more than an hour or so a day won't help. Sunlight exposure is key: If you're ...


9

Different people, react different to jetlag. Some just don't have any problems, others are out of sync for days. I am sort of in between. I deal with jetlag by trying to have a more irregular day/night structure in the days before the journey, so my body doesn't notice that much difference when crossing multiple time zones. At the same time I stay away ...


9

In Addition to Mark: 8 Jetlag. It will happen. Plan for it. Put yourself onto destination time as quickly as possible. Even on the flight, if its night time, doze or sleep if possible. This will result in some very short/long days depending on direction, but the quicker you can adjust and function in your new environment the better! 9 Climate Especially ...


8

Kayak makes this easy to do with its "Overnight flights" check box. On a sample date (May 13), your nonstop options are: British Airways 178: JFK 8:00a - LHR 7:40p Virgin Atlantic 18: EWR 8:00a - LHR 8:00p United 18: EWR 9:00a - LHR 9:20p American 142: JFK 9:30a - LHR 9:30p If you are willing to make a connection, you could also take advantage of: ...


7

It all depends how long you're there for. Anecdotally, many travellers will tell you it can take one day per hour difference - ie 10 days for 10 zones, to 'catch up'. In reality, it's different for each person, and when the flight is. In addition, it's generally harder flying east than flying west. I recommend reading "How can I avoid or minimize jet ...


7

In general the best advice is be prepared! No one has mentioned Sudoku. What I do is go to the website web sudoku and print off a bunch of sudokus. I then put them on a clip board so I have a nice easy way to complete it. 1 sudoku evil will on average take me about 45 mins.. (I'm slow.) The nice thing is, the time flies by and you don't even notice it. ...


6

I think 3 hours is the most I would be prepared to be "out of sync", unless I was only going for a weekend. Presumably the reason you are traveling is to work with people in person, not to sit alone in your hotel room from 11pm to 7am local time getting in a full day's work, then head out for a little sightseeing and a few beers at 8am. (Or if it's the other ...


6

I recommend the flight search site matrix.itasoftware.com, which is nice because it offers a ton of search options, and only shows you information, they don't sell you flights, so you can trust them. There are a number of hidden advanced options, one of which is / -redeye to rule out redeye flights. If you are flexible with your origin and destination, you ...


5

Wear earplugs during the flight. They'll help you sleep on the plane and you'll also be less frazzled when you get off. I recommend the silicon putty ones, since you can mold them to the shape of your ear opening. The foam and rubber flange ones can be uncomfortable.


3

You can minimize jet lag by travelling at a slow pace. For instance, getting from New York to Southhampton with the Queen Mary II gives you seven 23h-long days. More usual is to travel by bus/train/hitchhiking and have many stops along the way.


2

Lots of excellent advice given in the other answers. One or two extra points, in no particular order: I've tried both noise-cancelling headphones and in-ear earphones. The latter are far better at keeping out extraneous noise, and an extra benefit is that their efficiency at this allows you to turn down the volume of your device more than otherwise, thus ...


2

One point that hasn't been mentioned: Watch out for what you eat or drink. I recently traveled to Switzerland, thus getting up 7 hours earlier, and did what I usually do: Little or no sleep on the way over, and immediately adjust to the local time. But I had a terrible time getting over jet lag. It turned out to be due to cereal. For some reason, dairy ...



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