Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

I used this Tokyo Cheapo post to find internet cafes (specifically the Manboo! brand). Manboo! has standard pricing and are relatively easy to find.


1

After some quick searching, I wasn't able to turn up anything specific either. However, Japan now does subscribe to the Hague Convention. This assumes that the minor child has a passport and that the other parent is alive. So, to be safe: A notarized statement from the non-custodial parent stating that you have permission to take the child out of the ...


4

The Suica & NEX package has been discontinued. The replacement deal is the NEX Tokyo Round Trip Ticket.


1

For your Korea trip, as long as you both one way tickets before you go, then you will have no problem proving your intended departure from Korea. The outbound flight does not have to be on the same airline nor to the same destination. Japan won't care if your family enters, goes to Korea and then returns. They would likely only be worried if you started ...


3

For your second question, no, there shouldn't be a problem in re-entering Japan. Even in the unlikely event that you are questioned, you have your ticket back to France to show that your goal is not to stay for another 90 days. It's better to ask one question per question, by the way...


3

Yes, you can. On March 23, 2013, the ten largest transit smartcards in Japan became fully(*) compatible, and this includes Pasmo, Suica and all three systems used in and around Fukuoka: Sugoca (JR Kyushu), Nimoca (Nishitetsu) and Hayakaken (Fukuoka City Subway). (diagram courtesy of JR East) (*) For tickets, anyway, electronic money is a little more ...


2

An alternative option, is the Pasmo. I 'lived' in Tokyo for 6 days because it was just a short visit. What I found really useful was the Pasmo (blank card). A card which you can put money into it and use it to travel around on public transport around the metropolitan area of Tokyo (this is what I did) It's great because there are many 'stations' to load more ...


7

The vast majority of public baths are separated by gender, so although mixed baths still exist, you're unlikely to find one by chance. No swimsuit (or anything else) is normally allowed, as the Japanese consider that it would spoil the water (not even your hair may touch the water, in particular). Again, some special places may allow swimsuits for some ...


1

TL;DR: Roppongi is one of Tokyo's main nightlife hubs and you can find pretty much anything you're looking for: flashy or underground, expensive or cheap, above the board or super sleazy. It's also Tokyo's main expat nightlife area in both good (lots of ladies who like foreigners) and bad (a fair few clip joints out to fleece unsuspecting tourists), but as ...


5

If you are used to travelling by yourself, you will be fine. In subways and trains they usually make announcements in English as well as Japanese. At the very least for stations where tourists would want to get off, but often for all stations. If you go to the information counter or the guy sitting next to the ticket gates in the train stations you can get ...


5

I asked the same on flyertalk and the answer was: don't bother with a guided tour.


1

With British Airways I had to prove onward travel from Israel (USA Passport), which I did by purchasing on the spot a return one-way refundable ticket that I had refunded on arrival in Israel. British hit upon the profitable idea of selling it to me in GB Pounds and refunding the same quantity but in US Dollars; it took a few weeks but the credit card ...


7

It's generally true, but the reasons why are a bit complicated. First and foremost, in the words of a friend, East Asians and people of East Asian descent (eg. Japanese-Americans) visiting Japan are "stealth gaijin": it's not immediately obvious that they're foreigners. And in general, the Japanese tend to be extremely hospitable to people they consider ...


2

Japan has an exceptional baggage delivery service - you can specify the date and the 2-hour time period in which you want the package delivered. As long as it's not many days in the future (most stuff is delivered overnight) you can just have your case delivered to the next stop. Delivering to hotels is standard practice, anywhere you stay will have the ...


6

A quick search on google revealed many luggage storage facilities in Osaka. IMHO it would make sense to leave the luggage in the station/airport from which you would be departing/returning when heading/coming back from Tokyo. Shin-Osaka Station To this purpose, here is a page detailing how to access the luggage storage facility at Shin-Osaka station, for a ...



Top 50 recent answers are included