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2

There aren't any requirements from most countries. There are recommendations for some. For example: Japanese encephalitis if you're spending lots of time outdoors. A list for Canadians: http://travel.gc.ca/travelling/publications/well-on-your-way


6

If you are from Denmark (like OP and I), there is a very handy site called rejsedoktor.dk. For a two-week trip to Japan, you need the following vaccinations: diphtheria hepatitis A tetanus It is likely that you already have one or more of these vaccinations. Diphteria and tetanus are usually administered together at public school, and lasts for ten ...


0

None. I've lived in Japan for 12 years, never once heard of vaccination requirements nor been asked a single question about it at the airport. I expect it depends on where you are from, but there's nothing here of any particular concern. (But stay out of the Dengue Fever park in Tokyo.)


3

Getting a 7 day JR pass covering the long-distance trips between Tokyo and Kyoto may well be worth it (look up the prices for the individual tickets on Hyperdia and compare), especially if you use the opportunity to do things like a day trip from Kyoto to Hiroshima. But the higher price of a 14 day JR pass will not be justifiable for you unless you plan to ...


2

Willers express services are great . Exactly on time ! They stop every 1-2 hours on the way too ! Great bus . I was travelling with Willers express recently , see pictures and other info on my post :http://www.parrotfishjourney.com/latest-post/willer-s-express-bus-japan-shinjuku-sumitomo-bldg


2

It'll very much depend where on the island of Hokkaido you find yourself. The northern part of the island falls into the 'taiga' zone, with more snow than the rest. From Wiki: Snowfall varies widely from as much as 11 metres (400 in) on the mountains adjacent to the Sea of Japan down to around 1.8 metres (71 in) on the Pacific coast. The island ...


12

If you do a search with the terms sushi com chocolate (sushi with chocolate) you will find plenty of recepies. Nevertheless, it's certainly not a trend, I have ate sweet sushi before but I had never heard of norimaki with chocolate before. It's really common to find sweet temakis ("sweet kones") for dessert, I wouldn't be surprised to find one with ...


8

Try searching for "temaki de chocolate" instead. Searching for '"temaki de chocolate" Brasilia', for instance, got me the Sushiloko chain and a number of other restaurant mentions (I think - I don't speak Portuguese). It looks as if temaki with chocolate and banana, in particular, is certainly not unheard of.


2

It's not entirely clear where your trip ends, but if you're flying out directly from Kyushu, you are probably better off purchasing the JR Kyushu Rail Pass instead. If you do need to return to Osaka, you should probably get the JR Rail Pass. The "northern Kyushu pass" is ¥7,200/9,260 for 3/5 days and covers Beppu, Aso and Kumamoto. If you want to go ...


1

The Mumbai consulate has instructions that aren't as clear as the ones provided here by the Embassy of Japan: SHORT-TERM VISA (A stay of up to 90 days for tourism, business, attending conference, visiting friends, etc., that does not include paid activities.) (1) TOURIST VISA - Required Documents Self-arranged visit 1.Application with ...


1

As me and the others mentioned in the comments earlier, You don't need anyone else to sponsor you as long as you can sponsor yourself. You just need to prove to the embassy that you will not be a liability on the country and will not attempt illegal immigration. All this detail might be required for the tourist visa, if you already have the tourist visa, ...


1

Japan is pretty well-known throughout the world for its bowing culture. If you are in a semi-crowded place, you are almost guaranteed to see numerous people bowing at each other as they greet or say goodbye, so just mimic them. A slight bow works - I would recommend ignoring any articles on the internet that over-stress the complexity or the importance of ...


3

As long as you are polite for western standards it is usually fine. Handshake is OK although not common among Japanese people. Some Japanese businessman go ahead with handshakes when greeting foreigners, though. Hugs, kisses and other close contact, must be avoided and never ever tried. Slight bow while shaking hands would be just perfect.


1

I know a number of people have accomplished this by flying to nearby Seoul between when their tourist visa ends and their work visa begins. Fly there a couple of days before your work visa begins, have a short stay there, and then arrange your dates so that you re-enter Japan when your work visa is valid. Not sure if this is a reasonable option for you, ...


2

Having now done it, it's worth noting several things. ANA flies between Tokyo and Hachijojima three times daily. The first flight of the day gets you in with about 90 minutes to spare before the ferry, and you have plenty of time to get to the ferry departure. The ferry to Aogashima is 2.5 hours and is basically a cargo ship with tatami mats. Or you can ...


4

(Qualifier: I live in Japan ) This is common. Just ask at immigration for a regular visitor visa, explain that you want to use the WH later. Maybe put a post-it note over the WH visa and write まだ on it (means "not yet").


3

(Qualifier: I am a Canadian citizen and Japanese permanent resident) Japan does not have a non-working resident visa. All the working visa types require sponsorship from a Japanese company or a formal relationship with a resident. You are correct in that the long-term stay visa doesn't match your needs - that one is mainly for people who came here on a 1 or ...


3

Ask hotel A to arrange for delivery to hotel B. The delivery industry here puts FedEX to shame, it will cost about $15 per bag and if not the same day will definitely be overnight. So take what you need for one day and let someone else haul your bags around. This is a daily request for any hotel in Japan, they won't have any problems doing it for you.


2

In addition to coin lockers, Kyoto station has a manned luggage counter. The day I arrived in Kyoto, I'd used the coin lockers in Nara earlier in the day, and so was sort of aware of them being around. Can confirm that a quick search online shows that they're at the bottom of the escalator from the normal (not Shinkansen) JR train central exit. (Source on ...



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