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2

Kyoto has many places to visit, and is less than an hour by train from Osaka. There are many smaller hotels and ryokan there.


2

Go to Shirakawago. Not a short trip, train to Takayama then bus from there to Shirakawago, but it is a cool little village the steep pitched thatched roofs and historic minshukus. Totally different from Osaka.


1

Curry is an option (my favorite being 'Go Go Curry!'), they will have different meats available that isn't seafood. I won't repeat all of the other options listed, but don't knock eating western food. When I visited Kyoto, I went to McDonald's just to try another culture's take on something that was familiar. I happened to be there around Halloween, so ...


6

A really easy way to find casual food in Tokyo is to check out the plastic replica food in the windows of restaurants. You can easily recognize Donburi, Soba, Ramen etc. and the price is usually stated on the description. You might get a surprise such as chilled noodles rather than hot if you don't know a few characters. Personally one of my favorites is ...


5

I was in Tokyo last month, and I am also not a fan of seafood. I assure you, you will be fine even without doing any research beforehand. You should be able to walk into almost literally any restaurant and find something you will enjoy. There are Japanese people who don't like seafood, too, so even the sushi restaurant we visited served Udon noodles and ...


3

Asking if you'll be able to find non-seafood options in Tokyo, Japan is like asking if you'll be able to find non-seafood options in Rome, Italy. Yes, it's a capital city in a country with a lot of sea boarders, and yes, you will find a lot of dishes with seafood in it, but no moreso than you'd find in any other sea-boardered area. Tokyo is a large (very ...


6

Gyoza: little wonton-style deep fried or steamed "dumplings". Sukiyaki consists of meat (usually thinly sliced beef) which is slowly cooked or simmered at the table, alongside vegetables and other ingredients. Katsu means cutlet, and is usually pork or chicken. Yummy. Katsudon: Katsu soup. Tonkatsu: Breaded katsu. Yakisoba: prepared by frying ...


9

I reckon that individual restaurant recommendations are not the best way to go in most cases, but telling you to have ramen in Tokyo without pointing you to the right places is like telling you to have texmex in the Bay Area without telling where to go: you may end up eating at Taco Bell and having a bad experience. The thing about ramen is that, besides ...


7

There is a review here of Fukuro no Mise, which mentions an English set of instructions and an English speaker who works on Fridays. The review is from January 2015, so it's likely to be the same still. The shop's page (in Japanese) is here


13

Okonomiyaki and Ramen are both dishes with great variety, available with meat as well as seafood. Then there's Sukiyaki and Shabu-Shabu, various donburi, yakitori, vegetarian sushi variants, omurice... that's all the most common ones, I think.


14

While Japanese cuisine uses a lot of seafood, there are plenty of dishes based on beef, poultry, etc. as well as vegetable-based dishes. The problems usually arise when people have allergies or religious/moral objections to fish or shellfish, which might appear "invisibly" in sauces and seasonings. As a vegetarian who is willing to tolerate some "invisible" ...


0

No you do not need a Visa. Your nationality does not matter also. People from all nationalities can transit if they do not intend to leave the airport for activities outside the transit areas in the airport According to the Japan Embassy in India, you can obtain a Transit Visa if you intend to leave the transit area for certain activities.


0

Upon arriving in Japan (let's assume you're arriving at Narita Airport) you'll pass through the following steps (link) quarantine immigration baggage quarantine for plants/animal products baggage inspection and import tax At step 2 all people from all countries pass through immigration. Less important from where you came from is if you have a visa to ...


3

A throw-away Peach ticket from Osaka or Okinawa to Korea or Taiwan can be bought for about 6000 yen (including taxes) if in low travel season (middle of the week and not during holidays). Buying it on a promotional offer (currently none, but they have them regularly) can save perhaps 1,000 or 2,000 yen. Buying the more expensive "Plus" fare is useless ...


2

When you enter Japan you will fill in a landing card and submit it to the Japanese immigration inspector. One of the questions is "Intended length of stay in Japan". You need to have an answer to the question, or you will not be admitted. (Once I forgot how long I would be staying and left that part of the form blank by mistake, but luckily the immigration ...


1

Answer is simple.It's up to you.I mean it depend on your attitude.Almost bar is Welcome Foreigner,try best,even can't speek Engish,But some are give up to trying.Because almost Foreigner never try to understand this area's history,calture,and why this area still alive durring over 50years.After 1945,this town create great ...


4

In my answer below, I use the Nagai Park swimming pool as a reference, but I think it is almost identical to other swimming pools in Japan. It is totally not allowed to swim in any direction parallel to the width of the pool. Almost the same as what was already mentioned by @jpatokal in his answer, each lane has its own purpose (probably scheduled ...


4

I have just come back from a month in Japan, travelling through Tokyo, Takayama, Kanazawa, Osaka and Kyoto, mainly in tourist sites. There was toilet paper in every western style toilet except one at the Heian shrine in Kyoto which had a vending machine selling toilet paper right outside.



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