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-1

The best option is to sell them to someone else that is going to Japan, or use them if you got any fiends that want you to buy them rice cookers.


0

Currency exchanges do not seem to deal in foreign coins, at least here in New Zealand (I've exchanged US dollars and Japanese yen, personally). The exchange rate will also differ depending on exactly what exchange you use. If you're trying to maximize the amount of NZD that you receive, definitely check the exchange rates offered by various currency ...


4

In a lot of countries it's possible to ask your regular bank that has your bank account to procure currency for you. The exchange rate is usually pretty fair, compared to a tourist money exchange. This process often takes a day or too. Since you worked in Japan, you probably have a local bank account. I would suggest to talk to them, tell them how much ...


18

The usual rule of thumb is you get a better rate at the destination, but it never hurts to check beforehand. Look online for the "sell" rate of NZ Dollars from a Japanese bank and the "buy" rate for Japanese Yen at a NZ bank. Then do the math. If you choose Japan, the exchange service may not have small denomination NZ currency and definitely no coins, so ...


0

There's an excellent option - go to any tourist bureau (HIS, JTB, etc.) and order tickets from there. They normally sell packages, such as tickets plus hotel and it is often way less expensive than booking tickets directly. The only issue with this option is that people in these establishments may not speak English.


7

When can flights be booked? Tickets go one sale twice a year on a fixed day common to all airlines. For example, tickets for flights from March 27 through October 29, 2016 all went on sale at 9:30am on January 27. The day when tickets go on sale is announced a couple weeks beforehand. The old system of selling tickets only from two months before departure ...


40

It is quite rare these days (even inside trains) for the changing tables to be in the women's section, usually they will be somewhere in between the two sections, or inside the separate large restroom with the wheelchair icon (yes, you can use it too). If you do encounter such a case, though, it's not different than elsewhere. An apology (shitsurei ...


7

Not a terribly practical suggestion, perhaps, but one British woman has rowed solo from Japan to Alaska.


9

There's a Metasearch for cruise ships including all costs. You can do a search by region or from region A to region B. Searching California to Asia for the rest of the year it only shows 2 cruises departing for Tokyo from Vancouver, both in September, 14 days ~$1000 with cruise line Celebrity ...


1

You can travel on Freight Ships. (EXAMPLE) I am not so sure why you would like that, because there are also cruises to go your route. As for my understanding, your problem is not getting into Japan (an island) but leaving the US. There are many commercial ferries and sea routes to and from Japan (Korea, China, Taiwan…) But your problem is actually ...


21

Many cruise lines offer transpacific routes. Here is one I found via Google (cruise Vancouver Japan) link If you want to travel regularly, this would not be the best option due to the limited number of ships making that route, but for a one-time trip, it seems reasonable.


1

Ferries between Japan and Korea, China and Russia. Currently no ferry between Panama and Colombia. However, several companies offer multi-day tours between the two countries. Here's one. No ferries between America and Asia, not even between Alaska and Russia. And no ferries between the Americas and Greenland, Europe or Africa. Charter flights between ...


42

Travelling by cargo ship (mostly container but also bulk or ro-ro, never heard anything about travelling on a tanker, presumably for safety reasons) is totally a thing. More info and links to specific agents can be found in previous questions tagged “freighter travel”. Many websites advertise specific journeys but you can always contact an agent and see what ...


5

I also googled and http://www.freighter-travel.com/travel-itineraries.html lists what you are asking for, it says 1000 eur. Try googling simply cargo ship travel to Japan. Also see http://www.travltips.com/cruises/freighter/fareast.php


25

It's possible to travel on cargo ships, though I'm not sure how practical it is. There are certainly container ships sailing backwards and forwards between the west coast of the US and Japan (and China and other parts of east Asia). See, for example, this question.


1

The Japan National Tourism Organization lists the Philippines as a country that doesn't have a Reciprocal Visa Exemption Arrangement, requiring you to apply for a visa. You can find more information about what's required and how to apply for a visa for Philippine Nationals on the Ministry of Foreign Affairs website.


9

In a nutshell Only base fare tickets allow stopovers (途中下車, tochū gesha); tickets for additional fees such as limited express fees and seat reservation fees do not. In addition, only base fare tickets for trips of over 100 kilometers allow stopovers. However, base fare tickets for travel within one of five special city zones (Tokyo, Osaka, Fukuoka, ...


11

When? As a general rule, reservations for a given train open at 10am (Japanese time) one month before departure. For example, reservations for a train departing on May 20 open at 10am on April 20. Reservations close when the train departs. Some things to note: If there is no "matching day" in the previous month, reservations open on the first day of the ...


2

The quick answer is yes, you can. Read on for the details What to get You have to get your JR pass from your home country before you leave for Japan, they're not for sale there ! Here's a list of dealers, search for your region and buy it there. The green car is not necessary unless you want it, it's like a first class train. How it works Once you ...


3

By law, you are not supposed to remove consumables from the bag they're placed in until you depart Japan. This seems to be very rarely or never enforced, though. Purchased items must be kept in the specified bag until leaving the country. The departure customs counter at which you drop off the form in your passport is often not manned (and will have a ...


9

First a reminder: whether one posseses a rail pass such as the Japan Rail Pass has no effect on seat reservation requirements. If reservation is required, it remains so if you have a rail pass. Of course, a rail pass usually allows you to make reservations free of charge, but it is still necessary to visit the ticket office to make your reservation. (Note ...


1

I would be more concerned about my hips fitting between the armrests, then whether or not I need an extension. The airline will provide you with an extension for each flight. And there is no shame in using one, but if you are worried about the appearance, you can wear a loose fitting, un-tucked blouse that will cover over the fact you are using the ...


7

Don't worry. For example, check http://www.thinnertimesforum.com/topic/54606-q-to-those-that-dont-need-the-seatbelt-extension-in-airplanes/ I did not need to wear an extension when I flew last time - I am 5'9" and weighed 260ish pounds. I was in an 18-20 size clothes. last time I flew, I was prob around 300 lbs. (or a bit higher) and I didn't use an ...


3

There are numerous options available for transit directions in Japan however how many of them you can use will be limited by your language ability and your choice of device. Mainstream Apps Yahoo! Travel (Site - Japanese) iPhone [J], Android [J] Internet connection required. The site and apps themselves are all in Japanese however input can be made in ...


3

eConnect is one company that I used when I was in Japan that I know has that, and they use NTT Docomo network. (it's specified under network if you go to the prepaid SIM page). I went to very isolated areas in Hokkaidō and it worked fine


0

You will collect your bag at your first point of entry into Japan. You will present it for a customs inspection (and about 1 in 10 times, that involves someone actually looking inside your suitcase and your bags, it is not like inspections in many countries that are just xray machines or nothing). After the inspection you will find yourself inside Japan in ...


1

ANA has a page about the transit procedures at Haneda (complete with a YouTube video!) which shows that when transiting international to domestic you must pick up your baggage (to pass customs) and then drop it at the domestic baggage counter before passing through the security check for connecting passengers. This is all done in the international terminal, ...



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