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7

Imagine you're flying from London to Miami. Searching for flights gives you a long 10-hour layover: Or a faster 2-hour layover: Assuming the price is the same, most people would go for the 2-hour option. Therefore airlines are trying to undercut their competition by offering connections which are as short as technically possible. You might ask why don'...


13

It is all about (unsurprisingly) economics. An airplane (which is very expensive) only makes money when it is flying, so airlines have an incentive to get them in the air as quickly as possible. Technology has allowed for quicker planing/deplaning of passengers. Further, many things that required a lot of paperwork (thus slow and inefficient) are now ...


45

Airlines, in conjunction with airports, set a minimum connection time (MCT) for combinations of flights at a certain airport depending on a number of factors, such as whether one is international and the other domestic. The airline will offer you any flight that meets MCT and typically shows flights with either the lowest total duration or lowest cost first. ...


4

It all boils down to better technology and facilities. Now, we have online check-ins, online services, airlines provide apps that helps passengers in knowing things before even reaching airports. Internet is becoming more available almost in every mobile. All of that made the passengers smarter when it comes to air travel. Airports also becoming smarter, ...


5

Edit1: Only people inside the airline business may give definitive answer, but as per my experience/calculated-guess: Two legs of an itinerary are two different flights, with first's destination and second's start being same, among some other factors like same airline or alliance. Now this second leg may have its own constraints, like landing time slots, ...


4

TLDR: Unless you love adventure you should fly. Perth is a beautiful city, with some amazing beaches and scenery. If you want to do a grand tour of Australia it's a must. But there's several deserts between Perth and any other city. It's 2700km (1650mi) to Adelaide and you have to cross the Nullarbor Plain - a stretch 1,100 kms long on the edge of a ...


3

First of all, some companies do allow changes online. E.g. American Airlines allow changes for domestic bookings. As for why not every airline supports online changes for every booking: Developing a web interface for ticket changes costs money, not to mention upkeep and support Airlines make most of their money on flights, not change fees People don't ...


3

I have been in Australia as a tourist, traveled east to west with the Indian-Pasific, overland (with a tour) to Alice Springs (seeing the famous sights on the way,) flew north to Darwin and took the train south. (With a couple of tours to see things where I was.) I love trains and sitting in a train for a few days, but even for me the Indian Pasific as sit ...


9

This almost comes under 'opinion based', but we can treat it as a compare-and-contrast option. Hi from Sydney, BTW. Australia is huge. Literally similar in size to the US. That doesn't mean you can't drive across it, but you have to take things into account that don't occur to people compared with the US: gas stations are few and far between in some ...



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