Hot answers tagged

89

I was in Venice in summer 2013. It didn't smell bad, even though it was hot. We asked some locals (who we were staying with) about the legendary smell. Historically, raw sewage was simply dumped into the canals and (eventually) washed out to sea. This had been the status quo for centuries, with some improvement over the years but there was still lots of old ...


85

Main Courses Pizza al Trancio The single best street food that you can have in Italy is pizza al trancio i.e. a slice of pizza on the go. It doesn't get more typical and local than this. You find this in both bakeries, as well as dedicated pizzeria al trancio. Some cities cut slices out of round pizzas, others out of rectangular ones. In both cases, you ...


54

There is no online database lookup when you leave Italy. At the most they will check your passport to make sure it is valid, and stamp it if necessary. Theoretically this could be done if you use the passport e-gates if they're at the airport you're using and you're eligble to use them. However, there is absolutely zero chance that Italian bureaucracy would ...


51

It looks like it's Vernazza, one of the Cinque Terre - five very cute and colourful towns on the Italian coast. The photo seems to be shot as much the same as this image, but flipped for some reason: Image by chensiyuan [ GFDL or CC BY-SA 4.0-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0 ], via Wikimedia Commons Unfortunately, your visit might be more difficult than you'd like. Some ...


38

First of all, looking at the reviews for Osteria da Nico on Tripadvisor, regrettably you fell prey to a tourist trap. Regarding your question on pricing by weight: such is typical for foods such as meat (e.g. a steak) or especially seasonal fish but very untypical for regular courses (such as e.g. a Pizza). You can find the menu of a reputable Italian ...


33

I have heard this "fact" many times. Another version states that this is especially true in the summer. I was on a trip to Italy only last month and visited Venice as part of it. I spent three days there, took vaporettos (ferries) and walked most of the time. The water ways and canals do host a wide variety of algae and water-weeds and it is indeed true ...


29

Look for unmanned automatic laundry places. Since the washers/dryers there are usually coin-operated, you'll find a coin dispensing machine to convert your notes into shrapnel. You're likely to also find similar machines at self-service car-washes, or in any other business providing coin-operated services. They usually look something like this: Cassa per ...


27

According to the ataf website (which I can transalte for you in the part concerning administrative fines), you have 15 days to pay the fine before getting a written notification. After the notification, you will have to pay the full fine (rather than a reduced one) within the next 60 days. After that term, an additional procedure (possibly via court) will ...


22

"3 Hours" is a very common recommendation for international flights at many airports around the world - and it's almost always far more time that you need. Airlines like to get passengers to the airport early, not only because it gives more buffer if there are any problems, but also as it spreads out the "rush" period before the flight - you can imagine what ...


21

From Saint-Peter's Basilica site:


19

It's common practice in Italy. It's called "coperto" (cover charge). Even though it's sometimes phrased as "pane e coperto" (bread and cover charge) but even if you don't touch the bread you are still required to pay for it. It is usually stated somewhere on the menu, although in some cases not very prominently. So this does not only happen to tourists. To ...


19

As a general principle, the entire Schengen area is considered one country for immigration purposes. This means in particular that a flight between two Schengen countries (in your case, Spain and Italy) is considered a domestic flight and there is no immigration control before or after the flight. Hence, in your case you will enter the Schengen area and ...


18

Enter a bar or supermarket and ask if they can change your 10€ bill into 1€ / 2€ coins for the parking. Repeat again in some other place. Probably they will stare badly at you. You're not obliged to consume or buy anything. Be warned that some cashiers may refuse your request. This is a common behaviour even for italians. This site reports that parking ...


16

The two main public transportation are ACTV and Alilaguna. You have quite a few options Murano: from Piazzale Roma or from Venezia Santa Lucia train station, take the ACTV line 3. The trip takes 20 mins. You could also take line 4.2 but it takes almost 40 mins. From the airport you can reach Murano in 30 mins using the Alilaguna public transportation. If ...


16

The typical restaurant meal in Italy is made up of four courses: Antipasto - the starter Primo - first course (usually pasta or soup) Secondo e contorno - second course (usually meat or fish) with sides (usually vegetables) Dolce - dessert These courses can be further wrapped by serving an aperitivo (aperitif) before the meal, and coffee and ammazzacaffé ...


15

I'd want to hire it as far from busy big cities as possible. The idea of damaging one, even if insured, would be so upsetting. So to maximise this, you'd want to do it during term time (kids in school, less people on holiday), when there's good weather. You'll want to pick up the car outside of rush hour, so around 10am, and still have a couple of hours ...


15

Depending on where you are staying, the cost of a train trip for 3 may be comparable to a taxi ride. Going with the latter will be far less stressful and you can leave as early as you want, as long as you organize a dispatch with your hotel concierge. Good luck, and with a 3 hour buffer, I wouldn't stress too much even if you have to ride the train.


14

It depends. If your ticket comes with a seat reservation ("PRENOTAZIONE POSTO") then you do not need to stamp your ticket: just board the train. Shorter range tickets with no seat reservation, on the other hand, must be stamped. Your ticket probably reads "DA CONVALIDARE" somewhere at the top. Trenitalia personnel typically doesn't cut tourists much slack ...


14

The accepted answer lists the popular foods available in almost all Italy but I think you can usually find some local (and sometimes strange) street food. In Florence, for example, it's very popular lampredotto, in Tuscany it's not rare to find roventini (a sort of fried blood served with parmesan or chocolate). Abruzzo has arrosticini . In Sicilia is ...


14

Vernazza, Italy on the Riviera


13

Wikitravel.org has some ideas, which I've collected and grouped together below. It covers mainly respect, religion, clothing, and advice for women. Italy has a reputation for being warm and welcoming and Italians are uncommonly friendly and laid back, as well as very used to interacting with foreigners. If you are polite and civil you should have no ...


13

I would not only recommend sunglasses, but also suncream and clothes that protect you from the sunlight. UV radiation is generally lower during the winter months, but snow reflection can double your overall exposure, especially at high altitude.


13

There's no point in bringing US$, Euro is what you need. You can change from CAD before leaving or on arrival. You'll get slightly better rates in the business district (whether in Toronto or Rome) than in the airport. In most countries in the Eurozone, notes up to €20 are in common use. Larger notes may be slightly awkward to spend (you might not be able ...


13

I went straight to Wikipedia for this. Their article David (Michelangelo) states: David is a masterpiece of Renaissance sculpture created between 1501 and 1504, by the Italian artist Michelangelo. It is a 5.17-metre (17.0 ft) marble statue of a standing male nude. The statue represents the Biblical hero David, a favoured subject in the art of ...


12

I'm Italian and I visited Rome as a tourist myself about one year ago. The image which mouviciel so usefully linked is self-explanatory, but it is not true for Rome or Vatican City only, all the churches in Italy have something similar being displayed IF they are regularly visited by tourists (otherwise, the same rule holds but there is no specific ...


12

In your individual case, this could of course have been a ripoff. However, historically, it has been quite common practice, particularly but not only, in south western Europe (Italy, Spain, Portugal), to charge a small fee for sitting down at a restaurant. In essence, you could argue this is to cover, say, the bread and butter you receive but did not ask ...


12

You can obtain train tickets online on the Trenitalia website. It's better because you block the seats. There is certainly a high-speed connection between Florence and Rome. It's called Freccia Rossa. It takes 1.5 hours and starts every 30 minutes. The 22nd I would do Florence-Pisa-Florence-Rome. Florence-Pisa takes more or less one hour and you have ...


12

Tap water is always drinkable in Italy, especially in the cities (of course, it may be a little bit different if you are talking about a cottage in the middle of nowhere). The real question is how good is that. For instance, in Rome the water has a very strong percentage of limestone and it taste doesn't very good. For this reason, several people tends to ...


12

Yes. I went there in September and there was a consistent whiff of stagnant water more or less everywhere. It wasn't exactly oppressive, but I didn't get used to it either and I noticed it regularly. I was however only there for two stints of two days each which I accept isn't a large amount of acclimatisation.


12

Renting Winter-Equipped Cars in Italy I think it is actually possible to rent a car, equipped for winter road travel, in Italy. Indeed, Hertz agrees with me: To help you enjoy safer, more reliable and more comfortable journeys, we offer a range of winter driving accessories: Winter tyres - for significantly improved handling and stopping ...



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