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37

I just found this gr8 (well, not very great) workaround. . Didn't try it yet, but looks like it may work.


34

I had the same problem after arriving to the UK. There are two basic techniques: Plug the sink, pour the water and wash yourself in this water. I think this was how it was meant to be used when this system was first introduced years ago. You can mix it in any other container as well, depending on your needs. One potential downside to this method is that ...


30

Avoid the use of the word "fanny", as it is slang for, ah, a woman's front bits. Be very careful when referring to your fanny pack! Also, if an attractive member of the opposite sex asks you if you have a "rubber", double-check to make sure there aren't any chalkboards around because you're probably being asked for an eraser.


30

US "pants" = UK "trousers". UK "pants" = US "underpants" or for some people "shorts".


18

I heard an "Irish Car Bomb" and "Black and Tan" are types of cocktails/drinks. These are not terms that would be understood in Ireland, nor terms that are particularly nice. The Irish Car Bomb one is obvious. "Black and Tans" were a group of British merceneries sent over in the Irish War of Independence in 1920s which were not exactly very honourable ...


17

Its the same as the British one (Type G). Anyway (Type D) once common and may be occasionally found. The voltage in Ireland is the same as the rest of Europe (220 volts). Check the electrical outlet website for a list of the electrical plug types for the whole world. To be more specific, From Wikipedia: The British Standards 1363 plug[17] is used in ...


17

This is due to the Common Travel Area Zone (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_Travel_Area) and is not a mistake. The assumption is that anyone entering the Zone has already been checked by Immigration when entering the Zone. Eg, if you travelled from the US to Ireland you would pass through Irish Immigration. The UK then trusts that Ireland has completed ...


15

Ireland is part of Common Travel Area that comprises the islands of Ireland, Great Britain, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands, but according to Wikipedia: Unlike the Schengen Agreement, the Common Travel Area provides no mechanism for the mutual recognition of leave to enter and remain, and the United Kingdom and Ireland operate entirely ...


13

From spending a year or so in Ireland as a student: Not much is "must buy" - it depends on who you are. I found my greatest "buys" in Ireland were experiences, rather than things. So here's my list: A ticket to see the Book of Kells at Trinity College in Dublin. For that matter, just wandering Dublin. A ticket to the Guinness Factory Tour. You said no ...


13

I have often heard Americans use the words "poof" and "poofy" to describe what English people would call "puffy". For example: "That pillow is poofy." It should be understood that "poof" and "poofy" in England are slang for homosexual.


12

Would probably avoid trying to make jokes about "bad teeth" and horrible food as well. Brits in general don't take to kindly to jokes like that. In fact, I'm currently living in the states and some of the clichés the Americans have about us I can't understand where they even came from. Also, if someone calls you a "yank" they don't mean to be offensive. ...


12

It depends; there is no definite "yes" or "no" answer to this question. It might even depend only on the mood of the immigration officer who processes your new visa application. In general, however, it is always best to be truthful in all aspects of your visa application (I'm not saying you weren't before, despite what they thought). That means that if the ...


11

Wow, interesting question. Nature-wise there's SO much to see in Ireland - Cliffs of Moher, Giant's Causeway, the Dingle Peninsula. There's sights from Blarney Castle to the amazing history and sights of Belfast. However, if you're after things specifically that children may enjoy - 'history' stuff is probably out ;) I'd suggest the following to include ...


9

Short answer - you'll need to ask the property to be sure. All the mains tap water will be fine to drink everywhere in the UK and Ireland. However... Some hostels may have a tank which feeds some of their taps, so you may find that the taps in the kitchen are mains-fed and fine, but the ones in bathrooms (for an example) could be fed via the tank, and may ...


9

When paying for a purchase, be sure to make the cashier aware that you are using a U.S. style credit card which requires them to swipe the card and for you to sign for the purchase. Although U.S. style credit cards are no longer issued in the United Kingdom and Ireland, most cash registers are still equipped to process transactions this way. You may, ...


8

It applies to gestures too. If you're holding up two fingers to mean two (two pints, for example), be sure to do so palm out. Holding up two fingers palm in, especially if accompanied by an upward motion, is rather rude. (In the south of Europe it indicates a cuckold; in the UK and Ireland it doesn't have that specific meaning, but it's still rude.) You may ...


8

There is a nifty widget to check if you need a transit visa or not. This is from the UK Border Agency website: If you are coming to the UK briefly as part of your journey to another country, you will generally need to obtain a UK visa before you travel. If you will arrive on a flight, remain in the arrival lounge of the airport without ...


8

Separate taps are still pretty common in Australia though mixer taps are on the rise. What I usually do is check if the hot water is hot straight away. Usually it's not but I suppose this could depend on how the hot water is set up which may be different in Ireland. If the hot tap is not hot straight away I use the hot tap just on just a bit checking with ...


8

There probably will be a one-way rental fee between Ireland and the UK. For example, Hertz describe theirs in general terms here (update: it looks to be around ~1000 EUR+ for Ireland to the UK). I know from past experience that Hertz, for example, will show you the applicable one-way rental fee as part of the costing if you plan a reservation on their ...


7

I (an Irish person) only recently found out that this was an oddity of our country. What I do usually is either use just one (like the hot tap, but quickly) or the cold tap. It's not that cold! Or just fill up the sink


7

The tourist information offices in Ireland (here's a list from the Irish Tourist Organisation, 'Discover Ireland') sell booklets with maps of campsites. I got one in the Dublin office for €5. It lists loads of campsites, has some photographs of them, lists details (opening days, phone numbers, directions, facilities, etc.). They also sell booklets of ...


7

Tap water in the UK and Ireland is drinkable. There are a tiny number of cases where it is not, but the place you are staying at should post notices on any indoor tap where the water is not drinkable.


7

As @user1291332 has stated Ireland is a safe place to travel just try to avoid the city buses at night if you are on your own. While there are few incidents on them a taxi would be a safer option though a bit more expensive. Kerry isn't as well connected as the major cities (as you would expect) so it might do no harm doing a bit of research about where ...


7

First there is no legal requirement to have health insurance for anyone. Ireland has both a public and a private health system. Anyone can pay to see a doctor (about 50€) and you can go to a hospital as a private patient and pay for your treatment (€€€€) If you are an EU citizen OR are legally resident in Ireland you can avail of the 'free at the point of ...


7

Personal experience in Ireland (and generally with car hires, but not with Hertz Ireland) says: the credit card must be in the name of the driver and not be a prepaid one. There's three options to possibly get around that: Ask the company to take the money that would usually be only be "reserved" on your credit card from your debit card and refund it once ...


6

Elevator = lift Garage/ parking lot = car park Hot chips/ French fries = chips Chips/ potato chips = crisps Route is pronounced root. Side walk = pavement Jelly = jam Jello = jelly


6

Travelling outside of Ireland into Europe also depends on the passport you hold, but since you had to obtain a visa for Ireland, I would assume you need a visa for the UK and other European countries and since it's a single-entry visa I wouldn't risk leaving the Republic. From personal experience I wouldn't be so confident about going over the border into N. ...


6

The model railway at Clonakilty is worth seeing and if you are touring by car, it is worth while being open to distraction, as a lot of very interesting sites can just pop up - visits to islands, the Clonakilty Elvis festival, children's farms, butterfly farms, hawk sanctuaries, caves and so forth. Ireland has some very interesting old places such as ...


6

After quite some searching, the best I can provide is a link on gumtree which shows classified ads for soccer in Dublin. Several of them are trying to form teams or need extra players, and I'm sure would be happy to have a visitor join in for a game!


6

Almost always. Getting a SIM in European countries shouldn't be too hard, as there's usually an airport kiosk or something of the sort that sells SIM cards. If not, just pop over to your city's local mall or shopping street and there's bound to be a carrier store (Orange, Vodafone, T-Mobile, etc). The rates offered by the local SIMs is usually a tenth or ...



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