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11

Similar to one of your last questions regarding China, asking for concrete non-chinese documentation on Chinese regulations is in most cases not answerable. Why? Chinese officials are not known for transparency, rather the opposite. A lot of things, while visible at the surface through actions like stickers, blocked websites etc are extremely hard to find ...


10

Living in China 10+ years I can tell you with confidence that you will not get into trouble for using a VPN. Chinese people themselves also don't get into trouble for using one. (Promoting or sharing a VPN is a different matter obviously.) I wouldn't waste my time finding actual laws, for two reasons: Laws in China are interpreted differently than in the ...


7

It's possible and easy. You just have to go to one of the many mobile shops around and buy the sim card. In Portugal there are 3 physical operators: TMN Optimus Vodafone You also have some virtual operators: UZO - they usually have nice prices but everything is done on-line. You can buy a card in mobile phone shops or by snail mail REDE 4 - similar ...


6

I would recommend you to get someone to write down for you how to say the proper question in Chinese, print it out and show it to people. That would bridge the language gap. From my perspective your real issue is that you do not only need a power outlet, but a chair next to it and a permission to sit there for a while and work. If you would have a working ...


5

Even though I still believe that using WiFi at the airport might be a better solution for your data needs you can a MiFi device from places like: Global WiFi Rental, which is available for pick up and return at the airport. And similar discussion on TripAdvisor. There is also Cell Hire in UK that also offers the MiFi Rental service.


5

There is generally censorship in Turkey related to various topics like Ataturk, Islam, etc. Apparently there have been additional censorship and limiting of access to social networks as Twitter and Facebook but people have gotten around that too according Net Security and Guardian.


5

There are many to choose from. You'll probably want a prepaid plan from a "discount" provider such as Simyo or Aldi Talk. Here's a comparison. Typically the prepaid plan includes a pay-as-you-go rate that is very expensive (ca. 24 cents/MB), but you can add a flatrate option which will e.g. cost 9.90 EUR and give you 1GB of highspeed mobile internet within ...


5

In Valencia there are a few coworking spaces, where you can rent a working space for a few days, weeks or months. Workether is the only one I've been to. Their space is nice and they have a big room for events. InnovaEspai is near the city center, but I've never been there. And then you have Coworking Valencia. I think there are more, but I haven't heard ...


4

There are many cafés and other access points in downtown Reykjavik that offer free wifi (list list, map), as well as a number of Vodafone hotspots which as far as I can tell are free to everyone, not just Vodafone customers. Coverage is more sporadic elsewhere in Iceland.


4

Here is a good detailed article regarding Mobile Internet in Argentina. http://www.robhyndman.com/2011/01/04/mobile-internet-access-in-argentina/ Note the author mostly stayed to urban areas. He also added an update at the bottom you might miss Quick update: I’ve been dazzled by how popular open wifi is in Argentina, even in small towns. Bars, ...


4

Since the card is prepaid, is there any reason to not keep using it until it cuts off? You might want to keep it for voice use only (where roaming charges are not as high) as a backup or when you enter a new country and don't have a local SIM card yet. Theoretically, you can also cash out unused credit under some circumstances, but it's probably not ...


3

Lebara's website is available completely in English, as it's marketed to immigrants and offers cheap international calls. The national and data plans are more expensive than those offered by other discount providers like Simyo, Blau and Fonic, but still reasonable. However, they will deliver the SIM card only to German residential addresses. I doubt whether ...


3

If I understand the question, the needs are: Wi-Fi in relatively urban places where language and/or no Wi-Fi are the barrier Electricity in relatively urban places where language and/or no electricity is the barrier Also, I'm assuming two things here: You are going to be in China a while You have a smart phone or netbook with you and it functions ...


3

Finland, as with most European nations, is all-GSM as per http://www.gsmarena.com/network-bands.php3?sCountry=FINLAND but your iPhone, if acquired in North America, may not support the frequencies used there, especially for 4G LTE. I'd check the model number of the iPhone offered to confirm that, if you want to tether the MacBook to the iPhone for bandwidth ...


3

Chinese Yelp is called Dianping -- the Hohhot section is here: http://www.dianping.com/huhehaote Search for 咖啡 ("coffee") Click the button that says 总体评价 ("overall rating") to sort the highest rated shops to the top Click the first location, a cafe called 艾乐咖啡屋 ("Ai Le Coffee") on 赛罕区万达广场东区底商26-67号(近万达东巷) ("26-27 East Dishang Rd (cross road: East Wanda ...


3

I noticed this too when I was in Thailand. My guess would be that since fast Internet access, the kind that a commercial establishment would need to serve multiple guests, is relatively expensive in South / South-East Asia, they try to regulate access points for maintaining speeds. So for instance in the morning, guests would typically be out, and return in ...


3

The Internet access is currently available. The deputy prime minister told that as the government they have the power to cut the access to social media such as Twitter and Facebook, but they will not do it since they are democratic :) So no worries. As I said, you can have the Internet connection via 3G, wi-fi networks, or cable without any problem.


3

I use Boingo for accessing private wifi at airports and cafes that you would otherwise have to pay for. It is about $10 per month and works in many countries including Latvia. I did a search for hotspots at http://wifi.boingo.com and they seems to mostly be in Riga. So if you are staying there great, but if you are going out in the countryside not great. If ...


3

It's a pain in the butt to get mobile access in Turkey, but you it can be done. Your chances depend on how nice the person you find to sell you the prepaid SIM is, since they'll have to register the IMEI on your mobile phone with them. Easiest option in Turkey is to buy one of their portable 3G hotspots - they run about US$80 and include the hotspot ...


2

Maybe it's just a case of knowing what search terms to use. :) There are several that cover many countries - some Europe, some claim up to 230 countries (although I contest that there are even that many countries in existence), and others are just discounted. I'll list a few I found: Global Sim Woolworths Global Roaming Jetstar Global Sim Travel Sim ...


2

I'm not aware of any carrier here that offers the kind of service you need. Most of them have an "unlimited" traffic options but after a certain threshold of GBs what happens is that you can still navigate the web but with a MUCH slower speed. Your best bet is to subscribe for ADSL and then unsubscribe it before leaving but you have to be VERY careful ...


2

There are now lots of companies that sell Prepaid SIM for wherever you are going, they arrive by post before you leave home and you just put then in the normal unlocked GSM phone. As we are going to turkey in a month’s time, I can’t tell you how well any given company works yet. In the end we just went into a mobile shop in turkey, we had to try 3 so as ...


2

I just got back from an extended trip to London and had good luck with a Three pay as you go SIM plan. £15 got you 3000 texts, 300 mins, and unlimited data. I used an iPhone 5 and although the data was 3G and not LTE, I was pleased by both the speed and the coverage. I had no issues anywhere in London or on side trips 30mins to an hour away. I'm based in ...


2

Turkey has had censorship for a while due to it's penal codes, which results in strange bans (things like Youtube going down, Google apps being affected by bans of individual google sites etc.) that are sometimes overturned. If you want to surf generally without restriction you could do worse than have a look at Lahana. It was specifically designed for ...


2

That´s correct, you can find free wifi nearly everywhere in Iceland. If you leave the capital city for the countryside, I would advice you to get a hotspot device. This is really convenient to be able to search for some places, highlights or find the phone number of a guesthouse or campsite. This is quite cheap and the coverage is good (a bit less in the ...


2

All telecom operators in Europe provide pretty much the same roaming rates. I would suggest getting three separate cards for all three countries: Austria Czech Republic - get a prepaid Vodafone card Germany Otherwise just buy a sim-card in Austria and be ready to pay the roaming rates from the first link.


1

The best way I have found to transfer money is to use a FX Money Broker. Once your account is set up with them, you can transfer the money to them and then to your final account. I would recommend locating a broker in Europe as they will be regulated by EU and country laws. It will be cheaper than using your bank's exchange rate when making a transfer.


1

I don't think you are in Yunnan Province anymore. The only Jincheng I can find (晋城) is in Shanxi Province (山西). In a similar question, I linked the Chinese version of the popular Western website Yelp, called Dianping. For reference, the Dianping site for Jincheng is: http://www.dianping.com/jincheng Unfortunately, no one is really using Dianping in ...



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