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26

I traveled all the way through the USA from the east coast to the west coast, by car and RV. I thought about getting a UMTS / LTE stick for my Notebook, too. But there really wasn't any need for this. You can get FREE WIFI almost everywhere: Coffee Shops (Starbucks, etc.) Fast food Restaurants (Pizza Hut, McDonalds, KFC, etc.) Camp grounds Hotels Shops / ...


21

I arrived at the kit below by adding gear only as needed. I started with just an iPhone and laptop and only added to that when it was literally impossible to get reliable internet at my accommodations with the gear I already had. I have trial-and-errored through a bunch of other gear that turned out to be unhelpful or not worth the bulk (e.g. higher ...


19

My experience with China's internet has been "Have a backup plan" if you need access to some services. You can use Google's Transparency Report for China to determine the current status of Google Services in PRC. As of writing, no it does not appear to be blocked. However, there are cases where it has been - and it might happen while you are there. If ...


19

You can walk into any large carrier store - AT/T or T-Mobile in your case (since you probably have a GSM phone), and ask for a prepaid SIM card. No address proof, I don't even think they check your ID. T-Mobile usually has the best deals (value for money) and their 3G/4G network is pretty fast. Of course, I am assuming you have an unlocked GSM phone. ...


15

Internet is everywhere in the UK. You can buy a wifi dongle with prepaid sim card in any mobile phone store on any network. The price is reasonable - about £15 for the dongle itself, which include 1 GB of data. Then you just pay for data packs (£7-10 per GB of data depending on the network). Most hotels offer WiFi these days. Most small hotels include ...


14

The biggest problem with hotel wi-fi (and conference centre wi-fi) is us. Travelling nerds who need 2 or 3 IP addresses each (and try to do their work each evening while regular people are watching TV) typically bring these systems to their knees. I've had so many hotel people tell me they never get complaints like these the rest of the year, and I actually ...


13

One trick is to look up the place on Foursquare - if people have checked in on wifi, it's a sign there's likely free internet, and often if the connection is poor, people comment on that on foursquare as well.


12

@alx9r wrote a fantastically detailed post here, but I think it may be overkill. I'm on the road for most of the year and need to be connected 24/7 for work. For the most part you can get away with: An mini-router (I use an Airport Express). Flakey hotel wifi can be remedied by using a LAN cable to your mobile router, providing a personal wifi spot, ...


11

Similar to one of your last questions regarding China, asking for concrete non-chinese documentation on Chinese regulations is in most cases not answerable. Why? Chinese officials are not known for transparency, rather the opposite. A lot of things, while visible at the surface through actions like stickers, blocked websites etc are extremely hard to find ...


10

I'm in the same position as you -- I've been working in Sweden for the last 5 years, and I can tell you from experience that certain things will be difficult or nigh impossible if you don't have personnummer. Talking specifically about banking, no, it won't be possible at all. Even with personal number you might run into difficulties if you are only a ...


10

If you would install a FON router at home, you have free access to FON spots in Japan. The coverage seems okay in some regions.


10

Living in China 10+ years I can tell you with confidence that you will not get into trouble for using a VPN. Chinese people themselves also don't get into trouble for using one. (Promoting or sharing a VPN is a different matter obviously.) I wouldn't waste my time finding actual laws, for two reasons: Laws in China are interpreted differently than in the ...


9

Boingo offers "worldwide" Wi-Fi, with fixed fee, per minute, pay-as-you-go, and package deals. Their full plan listing is here. It starts at $7.95/month for unlimited worldwide access for two mobile devices. I've not used the service and am not affiliated, but have them bookmarked for my own travels.


8

Like Jonik said, the WIFI usually only covers hotels, cafes and malls (shopping centres). In Singapore however, the coverage is bigger, you can get WIFI freely across the island using Wireless@SG. The registration and usage are free. However the bandwidth really depends on the location. In Malaysia / Indonesia, it would be better to buy a temporary 3G ...


8

There are at least three sites online that cover this: Jaunted Wi-fi Free Spot Airport Hotspot Finder When I asked a similar question about Astana airport, my eventual solution was to use Foursquare - if people have checked in there, there's a good chance they had wifi, or may even mention it. I found the relevant page for the airport and voila - lots ...


8

OK after a couple of days of hunting I've found three places where I get a Wi-Fi signal and can buy a coffee or a beer, but only one had a sign and with the others I'm not sure whether the signal is from the place or a coincidental open one nearby... "Bar Kafe Real Madrid" on Rruga Studenti right near Shesi Demokracia, the central traffic circle of the ...


8

Finally I got a 3 (http://three.co.uk) SIM for 1 pound and unlimited traffic data for 15 pounds. You can get a 10 pounds - 500Mb plan too. All of these things as a prepaid plan and working in less than a minute. You get a ticket with a code to set your SIM card credit and that's all. Take a look at their plans here.


8

This is NZ we're talking about. It's still lagging with a smaller population in terms of technology up-take and bandwidth capacity. As such, currently, there are no unlimited data plans in NZ for mobile phones (Orcon has introduced them for broadband internet at home). Why? You can read the whole discussion about what might be required for this to happen ...


7

The short answer is, "yes, in most places at most times." But there are some important exceptions. China occasionally gets into "tiffs" with Google, or other Internet providers, which could cause a service disruption. Also, there may be a crackdown against the internet generally, possibly including email. Here's an example: ...


7

You might be able to try asking questions each time here with a shortlist of the places you have in mind. I assume you are already reading the reviews on HostelWorld, HostelBookers, and TripAdvisor? They won't necessarily cover the net connections in the places but they might.


7

After some more research, and help from a friend here in Mexico, I have found that the following bus lines (listed in alphabetical order) offer free WiFi on some of their routes: Autobuses Americanos provided me with Internet access between Austin, TX and Laredo, TX, but once we crossed into Mexico, the Nuevo Laredo to Monterrey stretch had no Internet ...


7

TrueCrypt (unless it is already installed) requires administrator access to the computer. This will almost certainly be problematic. This even applies to the TrueCrypt Portable version. TrueCrypt is not designed to be run on non-trusted machines. Instead of TrueCrypt, I recommend you use KeePass to store this data. It is built to handle string data ...


7

There are several different companies in Japan that rent or sell pre-paid SIM cards and portable Wifi Routers: mb.softbank.jp pupuru.com bmobile.ne.jp rentafonejapan.com sallysrental.com econnectjapan.com


7

It's possible and easy. You just have to go to one of the many mobile shops around and buy the sim card. In Portugal there are 3 physical operators: TMN Optimus Vodafone You also have some virtual operators: UZO - they usually have nice prices but everything is done on-line. You can buy a card in mobile phone shops or by snail mail REDE 4 - similar ...


7

According to the Netindex list, where Colombia is on number 105, the average download speed is 5.45Mbps. The list doesn't distinguish between internet cafes, hostels or flats.


6

Here's what I've found. If anybody has had personal experience with these hotspots, please share your experience. I would be happy to choose your answer instead of this one, especially if you've tried skyping through it using a smartphone. As of now (Jan 2012), several companies rent out mobile hotspots. They all seem to be renting out the same device, ...


6

The SIM is free, but you have to buy a service package. I looked up on Orange site, they charge 119 shekels for a 10GB package for private people (99 for businesses), and 4 shekels/1MB for prepaid plans. $1 = 3.75 shekels, and there's a VAT charge of 16% on top of the price. In addition to Orange, there are two other major providers - Cellcom and ...


6

According to Mexperience.com, some buses do indeed have wifi onboard, but generally only in Executive Class buses: ETN's buses now offer WiFi on some routes. The service is free and enables you to send/receive email, surf the net and make internet-based phone calls from the bus using a service like Skype. Service quality varies and, depending on ...


6

Use Mifi Mifi is a device that able to host a Wifi connection using 3G card. Small enough to fit in your pocket, but powerful enough to bring the Internet to your whole family wherever your wireless phone goes - no cables required. Just power it on and instantly connect up to five Wi-Fi-enabled devices.


6

I don't know the current situation about Wifi in those countries but I am a developer and I've travelled in all of them. I did not have a laptop nor did I do any work but once in a while I did some coding just to keep my brain in shape and learn new things. I general expect the Wifi to be better in Chile and Costa Rica than in the other countries and again ...



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