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3

It is issued by DHS nowadays. The forms you're seeing haven't been updated since DHS was created; these matters used to be handled by the Immigration and Naturalization Service in the Justice Department (where most federal law enforcement was located), but in 2003 INS was split into various pieces and all were transferred to DHS (which was created that same ...


1

In case the total amount of time you can spend there is more or less fixed, I would choose doing roughly two weeks Japan and one week Korea. My itinerary of suggestion would be as follows, though keep in mind that it's exactly the same if you do it in reverse order: Buy open-jaw tickets Zurich-Tokyo and Seoul-Zurich, you'll probably get a decent price with ...


1

Well three weeks is not much time, you could easily spend that in either country and just scratch the surface. For air travel, buying three one way tickets will likely cost a far bit more than buying a round trip ticket, plus a regional ticket. I would look at a couple of options: flying r/t ZRH-ICN or ZRH-NRT with a second ticket r/t between Japan and ...


5

You might already know this but it seems worth saying anyway... even though there is a European Union and money (neither covering all of Europe), the different countries in Europe have wildly different cultures. A striking example among others: there are public gardens in the middle of Berlin (Germany) where the Berliners sun-bathe topless... or nude. You ...


1

In 2015 no passenger oriented ferries operate to/from Israel, however some cargo companies will take passengers as well. Grimaldi certainly does, I am not sure whether anyone else does. It's significantly more expensive than flying to Israel.


4

The first foreign language in all of Europe is English. In all tourist destinations you will find people speaking it, often enough of them that you might think everybody in the country can communicate in English. In a few months you will not have time to learn other languages, but try to learn the local version, for each of the languages, of 'good ...


1

No. The only difference over a pure domestic itinerary at the first stage is that there will be a bit of extra time at the check in desk if (a) you have some weird through-check-in problem with a partner airline down route that day and (b) visa/passport checks. The other thing is that the "three hours required" thing is a bit of a myth. In some airports, ...


1

In general if you are traveling on one ticket, with both a domestic leg and an international leg, the international rules override the domestic rules. So when you check in, you are checking in for an "international" flight and the check in counter agents need to document your permission to enter (passport, visa, etc) the international destination. But the ...


4

It's very simple — since you won't be passing through immigration on your outbound leg (assuming an intra-Schengen flight), the first leg you are taking is not international. Same applies for other modes of transport - just because I take a flight to the US after taking the train to the airport doesn't mean it's necessarry to arrive to the train station 3 ...


0

Amazon ships this item in a Frustration-Free Packaging, and out of personal experience with this specific packaging method, I think it will survive. Make sure to wrap it in protective plastic at the airport to avoid sharp objects from puncturing the packaging, also make sure to put a "fragile" sticker on it as an extra measure just to be sure. From Amazon: ...


1

According to a website from the Mexican government: A foreign who has any of the following documents shall not require Mexican visa: ... b) Valid visa from the United States of America; So it seems like you should be fine.


0

The only potentially confusing part of this trip will be your transfer through O'Hare. But there are some ways you can speed this up. You will arrive in Terminal 5 at O'Hare, and you will transfer to your flight to LAX in one of Terminals 1-3. Since you're from a Visa Waiver Program country and you are traveling on an ESTA, you may be eligible to skip the ...


2

The flight ORD-LAX will be a internal US flight. What will happen is the following: You leave your plane in Chicago, go through immigration, collect your luggage, go through customs and then leave the secure (airside) area. You then recheck your bag and go through security. This process is usually well described by signs and you just have one way to go ...


5

I'm afraid it's more difficult than you realise. You can certainly stay in various South American or South-East Asian countries. You are almost certainly not allowed to work there, even remotely, but it's probably possible to get away with doing it. Europe is another matter. The Schengen agreement was intended to make some things easier but it's not ...


2

Norwegian Air's web site has an explanation on connections. If you have a single ticket with a connection, ninety minutes is more than enough time for the physical transfer and, moreover, if you miss the connection because of bad weather or another delay, they will book you on their next flight and pay your accommodations meantime. For two separate ...


3

As Gagravarr said, if it's on the same ticket, you don't need to worry. 1.5 hours is plenty of time even if you have to go through customs and have a checked-in baggage. Oslo airport is pretty small, so even if your first flight arrives slightly later, you'll still make it easily. In case it's late more than an hour and the flight to Germany is on time, then ...


3

According to Timatic you may not need to if you don't depart back to Australia when arriving from Australia. Visa required, except for Holders of a visa issued by Australia, Canada, Japan, New Zealand or USA to nationals of Viet Nam, only if in transit through Korea (Rep.): For details, click here CLARIFICATION Visa Exemptions: ...


3

On your way to Buenos Aires, you will only go through Immigration and Customs upon arrival in Buenos Aires. There are no border formalities leaving the USA, other than having your passport checked by the airline at check in time. On the way back from Buenos Aires, you will go through US Immigration and Customs in the first city you land at in the USA, ...


1

There is no exit customs or immigration check when you leave the USA. You will therefore do this neither in Portland nor Atlanta. The airline will, however, pass your information on to the US immigration authorities. Whether they gather this information at your initial check-in or at the gate on your transfer probably varies from one airline to the next. ...


0

Your airline will check your visa before you fly out, and they can actually help you resolve it on the spot, if it's going to be an issue. I flew to Australia last November with a visa tied to an expired passport, and the United Airlines Gate Agent at LAX was able to call someone in Australia and get my visa updated to my new current passport. Hopefully if ...


3

In general car hires in europe will let you cross country lines, at least within the EU (which unfortunatley Montenegro is not). However, you should confirm this with the hire company - either through reading policies on their website, or by asking them. You've got two issues to be concerned with - firstly whether the hire company's insurance applies once ...


1

Unfortunately, this question cannot be answered in its full generality. The majority of payment cards in the EU are offered only by banks and only to citizens of certain countries. Also, except for prepaid credit cards, a bank has to trust you to some extend in order to issue you a payment card. So without some credit history in a bank's country, this is ...


2

Just to post a followup. After a lot of emailing back and forth (with some totally unacceptable language being used on their part), the travel agent said they had been trying to make contact with Delta to resolve the matter and were unable to do so but they would honor the tickets on their end. Happy days.


0

As the OP asked about what happens in Hong Kong, not Vancouver, I will expand on my comment. If the airline you are flying from Manila on has an Interline agreement with Air Canada, then it is likely your bags will get checked through to Canada. If they do not, then you will need to go through immigration in Hong Kong, claim your bags and checkin for your ...


1

You must get your luggage at Vancouver as this is your first port of entry into Canada. You also must go through immigration first. Sources: http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/travel-voyage/ivc-rnc-eng.html and personal experience of landing, oh, I do not know, perhaps a billion times in Vancouver :)


1

This depends on the airport, in your case airports. You will be told when you check in but you could always call ahead to find out. In may cases, it will be tagged to your final destination and your bags will be labelled I2I which means International-to-International. If they are not, you will have to move them yourself. Since your final leg is domestic, it ...


2

Yes, you need to do a whole nine yards, Canada Border Services, Claim Baggage, Check-in, Baggage Drop-Off, Security, U.S. Customs & Border Protection (since it's a pre-clearance airport). It'll be a lot of fun (not).


6

The bad news is: it's such a broad topic & there are so many insurers out there that it's very time consuming to understand which insurances are actually "good" for you. The good news is: I had the same problem & did loads of research, so read on! Regarding health-related insurances, you are looking for what is usually called an "international ...



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