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75

I think the current usual solution is to get a debit card (or failing that a credit card) with low/no foreign transaction and cash withdrawl fees. (In the UK, the Halifax Clarity Card is the best for this at the moment) Then, when you get to the country, take out cash periodically. Not too much in case of issues, but don't assume you can do it too often as ...


68

Before you leave, call your bank. You'll want to alert them that you'll be using your credit or debit cards overseas, so as not to trigger fraud alerts. Then ask them if there is a network in your destination that involves lower fees. For example, my bank gave me names of specific banks in England, Italy, and Germany and told me that if I used ATMs at those ...


41

I do exactly this, and have done so for the past five years. I am a software developer (previously web, now iOS) doing contract work for customers in a range of countries. I live in about five or six countries each year, spending anywhere from a week to several months in each. I've lived in Tokyo, Bangkok, Singapore, London, Rome, Prague, Sydney, Melbourne, ...


35

I'd ask if she had any blank cheques (checks) with her. A common trick is to remove a cheque or two from the middle of a book so it isn't immediately noticed. With a perfect sample of her signature, she could be set up to lose thousands of dollars from her chequing account. This was no accident. On the positive side, the motives are more likely those of ...


28

Very simple: From the US State Department Website last sentence. A federal or state law enforcement agency may request the denial of a passport on several regulatory grounds under 22 CFR 51.70 and 51.72. The principal law enforcement reasons for passport denial are a federal warrant of arrest, a federal or state criminal court order, a condition of ...


27

Many countries have travel advice agencies run by their respective governments. The US: http://travel.state.gov/travel/travel_1744.html The UK: http://www.fco.gov.uk/en/travel-and-living-abroad/travel-advice-by-country/ Australia: http://www.smartraveller.gov.au/zw-cgi/view/Advice/ France (in french): ...


27

First of all, it doesn't matter where you're flying from. What really matter is what airline you are flying with, so the short answer is: it depends. Some airlines, in an attempt to fight frauds, may ask you to show the card and if you fail to do so they CAN refuse to embark you. I once flew Royal Jordanian from Milano Malpensa to Amman and I was asked to ...


26

If you pay by Dollar (or home currency) The hotel will add a charge for this, hence you will be paying more. If you pay by local currency the exchange rate will be decided by the credit card company or bank. These exchange rates are much better than the hotel rates. Check this Visa page for more information regarding this service for Visa holders. AFAIK, ...


26

As far as I know, there is not such a world-wide standard, however there is an EU regulation. From www.europe.eu: A prescription delivered by a doctor in your country is valid in all EU countries. However, medicine prescribed in one country might not be available in another, or it may bear another name. As of 25 October 2013 you are able to ask ...


23

We recently caught the ferry from the UK to Europe and needed to have these stickers (for the other way around). We bought them before hand from UK car shop Halfords where they just call them "headlamp converters". We also found find that everything needed for driving in other countries was sold on the ferry. They sold the headlamp converters, the country ...


22

For most people trying what you propose, making money while traveling, is not possible. Luckily, there are plenty who prove this just a rule of thumb, not a hard law. Yes, it's possible to make enough money from a vlog, a blog, photography, professional articles or travel advice. But it's very hard to get started, and no real shortcuts to make it big. From ...


21

My answer is Europe centric: We are used to banks in the USA that will give you a debit or check card with a magnetic stripe. Credit cards are the same way. Some of these credit cards have a chip and almost none of them require a pin when used as a credit card. On the other hand, when you fly / sail / swim across the pond to Europe, almost every local card ...


21

From personal experience, I can tell you that I once (almost) was not allowed to board a plane because, at checkin, I was told I needed at least two empty pages in my passport to allow for stamps and visas. This was (and is) a requirement of the destination country, even though it had little relevance to me (I already had a full page visa for said country, ...


21

Take two suitcases. You will (probably) get charged extra for the overweight bag, and if it's too overweight they won't accept it at all. And you will pay again on the return. Assuming you are going on vacation, you will most likely buy something and need a way to carry it home. yes? One overweight, stuffed to capacity case won't work. Note that a ...


20

Yes, the situation has greatly changed since 2001 :) Today you can get into Saint Petersburg in many ways by ferry: By St. Peterline company ferries: by "Princess Maria" Monday, Thursday, Saturday at 19:00 from Helsinki (you'll be at St-Petersburg at 09:30 AM next day) by "Princess Anastasia" (sorry, only link in Russian are available) Wednesday, ...


19

What you want is an "open return" ticket. The outgoing flight is confirmed and the return is "open". Depending on the type of ticket, the return can be up to a year after departure. You can book the return ticket after departure--subject to availability of course. Sometimes you can even change a confirmed return without penalty. You'll probably have to buy ...


19

For contingent purposes, I always carry the following, in no particular order: Printed copies of my passport and visas (also electronically on my mobile and laptop) Printed and electronic copy of my travel itinerary (I use TripIt on my mobile, and it's always there anyway). Printed copy of my accommodation confirmation (if available) Visa-supporting ...


19

Cuban refugees in the 1960s who were given US residency did not have access to US passports until they became citizens. They were unable to obtain Cuban passports. They were instead issued a passport-like re-entry document by the United States which they used for travel to third countries. If Ecuador or another country issued such a document Snowden could ...


17

This varies very much depending on your country of origin and your destination. Best exchange rate mean lowest spread, but keep in mind, that some banks apart of the spread, also charge extra commissions. Keeping that in mind, there are some general tendencies. Exchange rates, from best, to worst: electronic transactions (i.e. transactions made directly ...


17

The level of support offered by embassies will vary widely from each foreign embassy / consulate to another. A couple of standard support measures provided though are: Contact family members to pass messages along Provide details on contact information on local lawyers, and interpreters if needed. Depending on whether such a support system is available for ...


17

I think you have to look a little closer at your page that claims widespread acceptance. each entry is a single claim (supported only by a photo of an entry stamp page) of one person who has managed to get into that country using a World Passport. So for most countries, typically about ten people in the history of the passport have been successful with it. ...


17

There's a good article to answer your question on the Washington Post website: All those jokes comparing Snowden’s case to the Tom Hanks film “The Terminal”? They have a distinctly unromantic basis in the life of Iranian Mehran Karimi Nasseri, who lived in Paris’ Charles de Gaulle Airport for 18 years after Iran expelled him.


17

I spent quite a lot of time investigating this last year. Last time I checked (around February 2012) the only realistic possibility of a traditional courier flight without knowing anyone on the inside or with an airline is with British Airways, who offer a courier spot on flights between London Heathrow and Tokyo Narita. I called up their reservations ...


17

There seems to be no limit as such. However if you carry more than 10'000 €, you might have to declare it depending on the country. For example in Germany, you are to declare it when orally asked to do so. For the UK on the other hand, there seems to be no need to do so. So if you consider taking more than 10'000 €, you should check the rules for the ...


17

Overweight bags are not only so designated as a way to make money for the airline . They can actually be difficult for baggage handlers to, well, handle, and to place inside the hold etc. The extra fee is to deter you from bringing a heavy bag; the airline would definitely prefer even a single traveller to bring two lighter bags. Then to complicate matters ...


16

There is a term called digital nomad. This is someone who has no real home and is travelling and working using the internet. As a software developer you can do a lot of work independently using oDesk or any other freelancer web site. Chiang Mai, Thailand is called the Mecca of digital nomads. At least what I know it is inexpensive to get health insurance ...


15

What I now do and it has worked really well for a few years is plan on average how much I will need, leave it all in a bank account with a visa debit card (maestro doesnt always work). I then just draw it out in 2/3 goes. Safe, convenient, easy and cheap.


15

The general rule of thumb is that one is supposed to arrive 2 hours early for a domestic flight and 3 for an international flight. That said, I've never found that rule to be terribly useful because it doesn't take into account size of the airport, day of the week, or anything like that. Personally, I also find the times to be a little bit ...


15

This is a very difficult question to answer in general, because different airlines have different seating configurations, seat pitches, etc. The best thing to do is to check out sites dedicated to airline seating plans, such as: SeatGuru (by far one of the most popular ones) SeatExpert SeatPlans All of these sites are built on a user-submitted database + ...


15

You may want to try Coworking. That's a way to get a workplace and to meet like-minded people from all over the world, many of them freelancers. I am writing this, sitting in Coworking Las Palmas, which I found via deskwanted. Among my colleagues are other programmers (like me), a translator, a biologist (I believe), a serial entrepreneur, and architects. ...



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