New answers tagged

1

I was in a tricky position when I went on my J-1 visa too. As you've noted, you can't insure locally as a resident. I also had some extremely high-risk existing health conditions, which often makes insurance companies run a mile. I ended up having to survey most of the high quality insurance companies in NZ (where I lived) and eventually found one that ...


3

The short answer to your question is none, but only when asking about Canada, that is, at the federal level. Health insurance in Canada comes under provincial jurisdiction so it's up to each province to determine how they cover you abroad. That said, provinces don't have individual agreements with countries but rather they're required to provide care at ...


3

If you booked via an Association of British Travel Agents member, then their Air Travel Organisers' Licensing (ATOL) scheme has insurance for a member failing, and will provide flights on another operator. Otherwise, you have to claim on your own travel insurance, or your credit/debit card.


10

In the United States, there is some protection if you used a credit card (not debit card), as part of general protection against failure to deliver goods and services as promised. In the USA, yes, but only if you paid by credit (not debit) card, the credit card bank is still solvent (in the current financial crisis, a major airline bankruptcy could push ...


6

If you can't get a credit card, (online) travel agency, or someone else to help you, you become a(nother) creditor of the airline. Normally, the eventual bankruptcy settlement will pay off creditors at some rate (e.g.: 30-40% isn't unusual), so you should eventually receive a refund for that percentage of your ticket price, more or less. Depending on the ...


34

An answer relevant to UK residents: use your UK-issued credit card. If you purchase an airline ticket with a credit card issued by a UK bank, the bank is liable to you for any breach of contract by the airline (including if it goes into bankruptcy). This follows from Section 75 of the Consumer Credit Act, 1974. To emphasize, because of some confusion in ...


3

This question is essentially unanswerable since each bankruptcy or cease of operations will be under different circumstances. If it's a restructuring, tickets will be honored. If there's is merger or acquisition, tickets will be honored in most cases. Any company can restructure or be acquired during bankruptcy. If the airline just ceases operations, it ...


16

They are worthless. Happened to me some years ago, drove to Miami, walked in the airport, just to find the counters closed; at the neighboring counter they told me that they filed for bankruptcy this morning. I had to buy a new ticket from another airline (for an arm and a leg, of course). Note that if you bought the ticket through a provider (like kayak, ...


17

Acording to ECTAA there is no regulatory protection against airline failure in Europe: PASSENGER PROTECTION AGAINST AIRLINE FAILURES When a tour operator or a travel agent goes bankrupt, there are financial guarantees in place to protect passengers, under the EU Directive on package travels and in the framework of the IATA Passenger Agency ...


3

Reciprocal agreements will normally cover the actual medical care but there can be other expenses involved with getting sick/injured while abroad which won't be covered. Accomodation costs can be significant if the emergency delays your travel home. If you are hospitalised on a longer-term basis then the cost of transport home in the injured state can be ...


7

In general the point of the medical component of travel insurance is to deal with acute treatement abroad and then if nessacery to transport you back home (flying someone home on a stretcher is not cheap). Accidents don't just happen when travelling, so if you feel the need for insurance against disablity caused by accidents then you should probablly look ...


6

Travel insurances are "one offs" for special occasions and hence people buy them rarely, for a limited amount of time and don't research them very well. The insurance industry often takes advantage of this and many policies are insanely complicated with lots and lots of exclusions and limitation to coverage. If you want to find out whether a specific ...


2

I do not know how this works for ACA, but I do know how it works for the earned income exemption, and I am going to guess the rule is the same. The IRS recommended getting an extension to file, paying what you think you owe (if any) with that form, due April 15. There is now a special Form 2350 for exactly this case, and you choose an extension date that ...


1

Normally an airline is responsible for your luggage and bound for compensation if it is damaged/lost by them. This compensation varies from airline to airline and only they can give you a better idea. Most people like to opt for a private travel insurance plan. Some airlines have partners which turn out to be convenient while some people resort to 3rd party ...


4

No, it does not need to match. I have a UK EHIC card (bound to my insurance as a UK resident) and have a passport of another EU state, that is totally fine and worked well so far. As you can see in the terms of how to apply, you can apply for an EHIC card as a national of the UK, EEA and Switzerland. All what counts is your proof of residency. (That ...


8

The best I can recommend to you is to become a member of the German Alpine Club (Deutscher Alpenverein, DAV) or the Austrian Alpine Club (├ľAV, all links in German). Membership costs varies depending on the "Sektion" you choose to become a member of (you can choose freely and I know many people who choose one purely based on cost) but is in the range of EUR50 ...



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