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2

There are a couple of companies offering insurance to long term travellers including work and holiday workers or round-the-world tourists. Avi-international targets all nationalities but requires you to be under 35 - which should be the case for a work and holiday visa. World Nomads apparently is not clear on that point for us citizens even though it ...


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In my opinion it would be smarter on your part to subscribe an ad hoc insurance in your home country. I imagine it would be easier to file a claim from the UK with a UK company rather than having to do this over the phone with a French company. To this purpose you should look for European car insurance, which extends the basic insurance cover - the minimum ...


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Every Border i have ever crossed in a car has had an insurance broker at the border. You can usually buy 7, 14 or 30 days insurance and it costs next to nothing. I must have done 30 border crossing but i have never driven a foreign car in Singapore.


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It depends on your airline's rules for redepositing miles if you cancel the trip... check this before booking. In the most common case airlines charge a fee to cancel the trip and redeposit the miles, and insurance often covers this fee. If you are a frequent traveller with elite status the airline may have a policy of waiving the redeposit fee. A good ...


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No, it is not necessary to have health insurance to receive a B1/B2 visa. It is not on the list of documents required. I can't find anything specific on the Bern embassy's website, but according to the London embassy, in their non-immigrant visa FAQ: Visitors and temporary residents are required to pay their own medical costs. As a result it is advisable ...


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Most travel insurance covers more than just your medical bills if you get sick or hurt on your trip, such as: if you get sick or hurt at home before you leave, and have to cancel the trip, you can claim for the deposits and prepayments (eg plane tickets) you lose if your illness or injury means you need to change your ticket to go home sooner or later, you ...


3

Yes, you probably should get insurance. travel.state.gov: While medical care in Japan is good, English-speaking physicians and medical facilities that cater to U.S. citizens’ expectations are expensive and not widespread. Japan has a national health insurance system which is available only to those foreigners with long-term visas for Japan. ... ...


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I have used travel health insurance from CareMed who, like World Nomads, provides post-departure policies if your departure date was less than three months ago. Having experienced both CareMed and World Nomads (and have submitted claims to both) I can not recommend World Nomads since they revealed some hidden restrictions and blocked my claim, while I had a ...


6

Yes you will have to pay duty, as it is a new item that was purchased overseas. If you were at home, lost it and bought a new replacement, you will have paid Australian duty on that item, as the importer paid duty when it originally came from the factory (and of course included the cost of that duty in the selling price you paid). In this case, if you buy ...


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I think the comments are giving some ideas of the possible reasons behind this choice. In particular, it depends a resident of what country you are. I just tried to get a quote on a car in the US on Avis website and first I picked in the dropdown that I was a USA resident and the second time I picked that I was a UK resident. As you expected, I got the same ...


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This would seem to depend on your insurer. Some travel insurances are “per trip”, defined as the time spent out of your country of residence and expire when your return there. Others have a specific length of time and cover several trips during that period. Both variants would seem to cover your trip but there might be others I don't know about. As far as ...



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