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19

Coverage is specific to each policy which can vary greatly for each country so it is hard to generalise, but I'll generalise anyway and hope it helps. As you mentioned, there are broadly two types of insurance that you need to consider: collision - which covers damage to the vehicle; and liability - which covers damage you may inflict to others. Since ...


13

Those machines seem to have been quite common. Here is a photo of one: There were even patented, but unfortunately the patent does not reveal the financial background. From this court case however, you can read about the process of making such a purchase: The policy set out across the top the following specifications: "Do Not Purchase More Than a ...


12

1 to 3 months is not too long term to get travel insurance. Many insurance companies offer travel insurance and there are many options depending on what you want covered, how much you want to cover it for, and the duration of the coverage. Your travel agent might only suggest one company though which may not be the cheapest or best. They seem to have some ...


12

Most travel insurance policies will cover delayed or missed flights, but you need to read the fine print very carefully to find out exactly what they will cover and in what situations, as it varies dramatically between policies. Most policies will only cover instances where the missed flight was beyond your control. eg, they may cover your train breaking ...


11

Caveat up front: I have not yet actually done this, but I am planning a long trip of this sort myself and have been researching this question in depth. The key thing to know is that there is a significant difference between "travel" health insurance and international health insurance. The former is designed as a supplement to the full coverage you have at ...


11

Answering my own question because this took a lot of legwork: We found precisely two insurers who cover travel beyond 26 weeks. (Only for uncomplicated births: no multiples (twins), no IVF.) Columbus Direct offers coverage up to 36 weeks in some countries. However, if you're based in Australia, their limit appears to be 30 weeks, and that requires an ...


10

I am General manager of a leading online Motorhome booking agency based in New Zealand called Motorhome Republic, so know a bit about excesses and bonds and CDW options on Motorhome and Camper hire in New Zealand as we deal with all of the companies. As you have found all of the Motorhome companies like to play with excess and bond levels and set them very ...


10

I imagine it would depend almost entirely on the wording in the PDS. If the insurer uses a term like "war zone" they should be defining it somewhere. Otherwise, contact them for clarification on the specific regions you're travelling too. That said, none of the insurers I've looked at use the term. They only talk about harm caused by war or military ...


10

TL;DR: You need liability insurance with a high limit. Your credit card won't get you that. Try to get your liability insurance from home, and failing that buy it at the rental desk. Your credit card might help you if you wreck the rental car, but read the fine print if you are relying on your credit card for that. You Need Liability Insurance (from ...


9

I'll try to answer all of your questions. First of all the insurance: there is a good chance that it will be valid in all countries you travel through, but I would ask before at your insurance company to be on the safe side. Then it is a good idea to take your insurance paper with you. I know in most countries (or all EU countries at least) this is not ...


9

If you use credit cards, then you should check into the member benefits (if any) associated with that card because your credit card company may automatically provide some sort of flight insurance / baggage protection if you purchase the plane ticket using that card. For example: American Express Travel Insurance Options MasterCard Benefits Visa Signature ...


8

You don't need US driver's license, just your national one. Some of the insurances are mandatory, some are optional. This article on WikiTravel gives a good overview. Details differ between different rental companies, so read the fine print on their web sites. You usually have to be 25 or older and need a credit card.


8

As you say, Monaco is part of Schengen Area, which means there are no internal border controls between Monaco and its only neighbour (France). So you certainly do not need a visa. No one's even going to look at your passport. Quoting Wikipedia: Monaco has an open border with France. Schengen laws are administered as if it were a part of France [...] ...


8

Yes. It is called a "trip/travel cancellation insurance". Just like every other insurance, you get it before something happens, pay for your trip, get the insurance and then reclaim the money in case something prevents you from traveling. Of course, you will have to make sure that the policy covers the eventual reasons for the cancellation that you want to ...


8

Being myself insured in the Netherlands, I am not 100% sure how it works for non-residents but the way health care is structured here is that there is no national health service but many independent providers and several private insurers. However, prices and insurance coverage are regulated. In practice, general practitioner (huisarts) consultations are ...


7

I've had my luggage lost on a number of flights before and a couple times at hotels (I have no idea how this happened). My suggestion for flights is to always pack the essentials in a carry-on. Make sure you have your toiletries, soem underwear, clothing, bathing suit (if going to a warm place) packed with you so it doesn't matter if it gets lost. At least ...


7

Certainly it depends on the company, but it is common to include popular holiday destinations that are close to Europe (such as Morocco and Egypt) within their Europe cover to be competitive. As an example, The AA includes any country with a Mediterranean coastline as part of its Europe cover. The Republic of Ireland, The Continent of Europe West of the ...


7

In the end I ended up using a UK based company called Medici travel who gave me a very reasonable rate for annual travel insurance. Turns out that my health insurance policy would have covered me anyway for ulcerative collitis abroad, and I could have just got regular travel insurance. It's definitely worth checking if you have health insurance if your ...


7

I found a statistic for you that lists the average medical evacuation cost for at least some countries: http://blogs.squaremouth.com/travel-advice/medical-evacuation-statistics-from-travelex-and-on-call-international/ As you can see, you have to be prepared for some 10,000 USD.


7

Primary travel insurance pays for any claims you make straightaway up to the coverage amount you have while secondary travel insurance requires you file your claims with any existing insurance provider you have (medical insurance, for instance) and once that coverage is exhausted your secondary travel insurance kicks in. What's better depends on which ...


7

This will depend on at least four things: the rewards program, how close it is to your flight date, the insurance you've bought, and to a certain extent the reason for your change. For example, most programs won't let you cancel the flight within a certain number of days (22 is popular) and instead will only let you change it. Before that point, you get ...


7

TL;DR Get the card no matter what if you are travelling for extended periods of time in EU. It doesn't cost anything and helps a great deal if an unfortunate situation occurs. If you can't present your card for some reason, you might have to pay ordinary rates (could be very costly!), but you can apply for reimbursement from your health authorities back ...


7

Oh I know this pain. As a citizen you can presumably count as a permanent resident (as you've not officially emigrated to any other country) of Australia, meaning that you could look at the policies of World Nomads Travel Insurance. I used them during a similar period in my life (Kiwi here).


7

Americans who drive, carry their own insurance that covers them in any car they drive. If you're not American (or live in New York:-)), you're required to carry at least the minimum liability insurance under the California law. Is it enough for you? The liability is yours, in case of an accident, not theirs. According to this site, in California rental ...


7

The cancellation fee would have to be in their terms and conditions, otherwise they're pulling a number from thin air. Demand to see a written document which you previously signed (on check-in usually) which would indicate these terms. They can't make up terms as you go. If you agreed to something in the terms, however, then yes, that's the agreement you ...


6

One of the things you need to take with you is a safety vest, it's required in Germany. For the kick of it would try to run without sat-nav, if you can afford to lose some time now and then. I wouldn't make the 9 hours of Google maps 12, it's normally quite accurate if you don't stop. So it's a full days drive, stop every 2 hours for 15 minutes (change the ...


6

Cost of medical evaluation varies widely depending on what region you are travelling to, and what country you are from. Evacuation almost always involves bringing you back to your country of residence rather than 'closest' 'good' medical facility you need to confirm this when reading policy wording documents. According to an insurance group, typical ...


6

Not entirely sure if this is what you're after, as it's still a bit vague - but for adventurous travellers like myself, and others I've met in stranger countries regularly use WorldNomads.com It's all purchasable and able to be edited/renews/claimed against online, which is great for travellers without say a regular permanent address that some companies ...



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