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17

An adult cicada will not shed its skin, rather a young nymph will shed it exoskeleton as it grows. Likely what you are talking about is the final shedding when the nymph emerges to become a winged adult cicada. I never knew cicada shells were popular in the USA (they are in China) as there are plenty of cicadas in the USA. You can bring a shell in*, as ...


6

Mosquitoes can bite through any loosely woven fabric, which includes mosquito nets. They can also find their way through tiny tears in said mosquito nets. When traveling the best course of prevention is to tuck the mosquito net under the edges of the mattress. This helps keep the netting a bit taught and not sagging. Granted if you toss & turn a lot, ...


5

Long story short I can't find specifics on the subject of bringing the insect shells or casings into the US through customs, however, all of this is subject to regulations by the State where you're going and APHIS. The page from APHIS mentions email address where you can send the question and find out whether or not it would be legal to bring a cicada ...


4

Most of the people won't have any reaction from what the news are saying. Then, it is really hard to know the long term impact of an infected mosquito bite. With regards to protections : There are a lot of products available to protect yourself from mosquito. Those are pretty effective. Then, an obvious protection is to leave the lowest possible number of ...


4

I have been bitten when sleeping in a netted bed that was not roomy enough around the feet. I believe it was because my feet were touching the net. The net was tucked in, but the slope at the foot of the bed was too shallow so the net touched my feet. My solution: since I had mosquito repellent with me for the daytime, spray some on my feet for extra ...


3

No country will ever control the mosquito, at best they might reduce its population in cities. Mosquitoes are one place GMO would be great, modify their genes so the female does not need to blood to produce her eggs ;-) There is only one real course of action against Zika, Dengue, JE and the myriad of other mosquito borne diseases ... don't get bitten. ...


2

You can eat ants in Colombia. You can eat a whole bunch of different types of creepy crawlies in Thailand. You can eat locusts in much of southern Africa.


2

We were there (late) July - (early) August 2014 and didn't have any problems. As previous contributors have said, always carry bug spray anyway (Lidl do one that's pretty good) and take plenty of water to drink.


1

The same precautions to prevent malaria apply for preventing Zika. On top of that, the current and future spread of Zika is fairly well documented, so you could choose to avoid particular areas. That said, though there are obvious risks, there are much more likely challenges to worry about (malaria, dengue, food poisoning, etc.) As you can see in the ...


1

Deep-fried tarantulas are a specialty of Skuon, Cambodia: "Skun spiders closeup" by A. www.viajar24h.com - Licensed under CC BY 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons. How "traditional" this is is disputed: apparently this dish came to be out of necessity during the Khmer Rouge years, and has lived on as a novelty. They're not regularly eaten anywhere in Cambodia ...


1

I live in French Polynesia (tropical country) and I use monoi. I works very well against mosquitoes, you just have to put more every 3-4 hours. The mosquitoes here really like to bite the feet, especially when I'm working at my desk so I don't bother covering my whole body with monoi, just my feet and ankles.



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