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3

My wife and I have done many trips where the extent of our washing of clothes has been done in the bathroom sink. If you're in a location for a couple of days it's very easy to do washing the first day and leave them around your room to dry (after wringing them out of course), and it's best (as choster commented) to take clothes that dry quickly. There ...


4

The weather in south it is often wet and windy, the north slightly less so, but can get some nasty cold spells, although it shouldn't be too extreme in July. For going high up in the mountains or travelling in the mid-interior you would need of course to be prepared for much lower temperatures and sometimes extreme weather. The main thing to think about is ...


8

Layers. Bring several. The average temperatures you quote are very misleading. Two years ago I was there in July and, while I would concur with the average, temperatures varied between 4C and 20C. That means that I used a thin long-sleeve top and was slightly hot around noon and was quite cold with a jacket, sweater plus long-sleeve top at night. Light ...


7

No. The most recent theme park to have to closed down in Iceland (back in 1994) was in Hveragerði but nothing remains of it today. It wasn't even much of a theme park, the rides were mostly of the mobile variety. No roller coasters or such. There was an older one that operated in 1946 and shut down in 1965. Nothing remains of that either. If you want to ...


3

Bathing in the cave dates back to the 18th century when the Icelandic outlaw Jón Markússon lived in the area and bathe there. Until the 1970s many Icelanders bathed at Grjótagjá, men in one cave and women in another. The Krafla eruptions from 1975 to 1984 caused the water in the cave to rise above 50°C. Water temperatures forced the “closing” of ...


2

You will not be able to get there on foot. It is more than an hour's drive from the Ring Road on 862/864. I'm sure there are 4×4 tours you could hire, but I am not aware of a public route there.


5

You are correct that most people travel by car. The main roads are excellent and signage is impeccable. The best I've seen anywhere! There are even maps along the road every few hundred kilometers. The other main form of transportation are buses. Within a city, they are easy to take and there is also an extensive network of bus routes. Most, if not all, are ...


4

There are no trains; Iceland has no rail-based public transport. The systems that do exist (bus) are under-developed, and while there are nation-wide bus and coach services, many of the locals will use internal flights to get across the country. Iceland actually has one of the highest rates of car ownership in the world (similar to the US) which has led to ...


10

I think you are misreading the picture. There is a grate running across the road itself that cars can cross without problems but hoofed animals (e.g. sheep) can not. Next to the road there is a gate that can be opened when driving herds. But this gate is never used to close off the road. Generally, in Iceland, a closed gate means no entry. Unless there is ...


2

Although all comments were helpful it seems this question is a bit specific to the situation, so here's the answer I found with research. After contacting a few rental companies in Iceland and talking to the Smyril ferry lines, only one rental company will allow the car to go off the island, whereas Smyril said it was ok on their side. Even within Europe, ...


2

You can leave the airport and go to Reykjavik or Blue Lagoon. It takes 40 min to drive to Reykjavik. For information about stopover in Iceland you can check this Iceland Air page and video


4

I know from my trip to New Zealand that it is a potential issue to put a rental car on a ferry. I rented a car via internet and gave as a pickup the south island and as a drop off the northern one. When finally in NZ and trying to pick up the car, they told me that is not possible despite me having a confirmed booking. They claimed that the insurance ...


2

Yes, major petrol stations do have wifi, such as all the N1 stations (company name). However it's only usually free. a list of all the N1 service stations all the OLIS stations, with the option to filter all the ones with free wifi all the Skeljunger stations It's also available at tourist information centres and at all branches of the city library. ...



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