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33

Yes, most Icelandic people speak very good English, you will be fine. Their language is indeed called Icelandic, and is fascinating in regards to its history. From wikipedia: The oldest preserved texts in Icelandic were written around 1100AD. The majority of these texts are poems or laws, preserved orally for generations before being written down. The ...


14

This article is invaluable for that sort of decision. The growing season (summer) in Iceland is two months long. The tail ends of the summer are the low points, which means early June and late August. Things begin closing down in September. By Christmas, all sorts of things are closed, all though from time to time the industry tries to bring tourists to ...


14

The "Visit Iceland" website has a page about your rights to camp in Iceland. Camping with no more than three tents is allowed on uncultivated ground for a single night, unless the landowner has posted a notice to the contrary. However, campers should always use designated campsites where they do exist. Do not camp close to farms without permission. If a ...


14

I guess it depends on what you want to do, and how long you're staying. Traveling around the country might be a little more difficult, but if you're just staying in the Reykjavik area you should be fine. I just got back from a short trip to Reykjavik, and had a great time. As another commenter said, more darkness means more time for the Northern Lights. ...


13

Driving the road is 830 miles and not that hard except for the narrow roads, blind curves, etc. There are villages all around the coast of Iceland. Nytimes has a good article. Now driving in the unpopulated highlands (the desert part in the middle) means driving in areas where there are no gas stations, no farms, no towing and you may have to drive across ...


13

Well one good reason to go would be more darkness. And more darkness = more hours during which to see the Northern Lights! If you do go, make sure to go when it's a new moon for even more darkness, and have a look at our question on aurora sightings. Also check our question on the best time of year to visit Iceland.


13

TomTom use "TeleAtlas" maps, and in fact they actually bought TeleAtlas several years ago. As with most mapping companies, TeleAtlas has varying levels of coverage for different countries. For countries like the US, TeleAtlas has near 100% coverage, which is to say that they have not just major highways, but all the way down to minor streets and even (in ...


12

According to the official Greenland tourism site there are two places you can use as your source. Rejkjavik and Copenhagen. There are 2 airlines servicing the island: Air Iceland and Air Greenland. The price Air Iceland is currently quoting for destinations in Greenland is 161 EUR (Kulusuk) and 193 EUR (Nuuk). I guess the further north the more expensive ...


12

Below are the answers to your questions, respectively: 1) Reykjavik is a pretty nice and relaxing city. How much time you want to spend there, depends on what you like and what you want to do there. If you like going to the pubs and just relax for sometime, then I would recommend to stay for a couple of days in Reykjavik. 2) If you want to take the Route 1 ...


11

In August most roads should be open. The condition of any given road can never be guaranteed though. You should consult the website of the Icelandic Road Administration for up to date information about what roads are closed. If you click on the Condition of Mountain tracks you'll see the current state. Most roads are open by now, but its been a cold summer ...


11

Yes. You can leave the airport. As a British citizen you do not need a visa to visit Iceland. Just be back in time to get through security before your flight leaves. You'll need to be back at the airport at least one hour before departure.


11

I was recently in Iceland (early March) and also rented a 4WD, with the intention of going off the main roads, but nothing too adventurous. I also visited Svartifoss. If you are just going to be sticking to the main attractions, you will not get anything worse than a gravel road and maybe a shallow water crossing. I had a bit of ice, but that was because it ...


10

This one leaves from Boston and makes a couple of stops in Iceland, one of which is at Heimaey where they famously fought a volcano and won. It also stops in Greenland and Scotland. This cruise also visits Iceland. Both of those cruises only let you off the boat to explore for 8 hours at a time (there are no overnight on-land stays), which I have to say ...


10

I've gone to iceland by ferry a few years ago, It was an amazing journey and I'm still planning to go back! Here is my experience: We got on the ferry in Denmark. It would take a week to get there. You get a two day stop at the Faroe Islands. There the roads were still made of asphalt (we later discovered that aspahlt isn't that well known in iceland) The ...


10

The only ferry to Iceland is the weekly ferry from Denmark. It takes a while and you spend two nights aboard each way (and incidentally get the opportunity to visit the Faeroe Islands along the way). The ferry is not guaranteed to run during winter (it mostly carries cargo during the winter months, if there is cargo going to Iceland you can book a trip, but ...


10

This depends heavily on the weather and where in Iceland you are. If you are staying in Reykjavík, you'll need to drive some distance out of town to truly get a good view of the northern lights. In more remote destinations it may simply be a matter of stepping outside. Of course, it could be cloudy the entire week. There are no guarantees. Indeed, even ...


10

Yes, you can, but only via Iceland. There are no non-stop or direct flights from the US to Greenland. To Iceland: Icelandair serves several US destinations year-round from Reykjavik's Keflavik International Airport, including: Boston Denver New York-JFK Seattle Also, these destinations seasonally: Anchorage (summer) Minneapolis (summer) Washington ...


10

I think you are misreading the picture. There is a grate running across the road itself that cars can cross without problems but hoofed animals (e.g. sheep) can not. Next to the road there is a gate that can be opened when driving herds. But this gate is never used to close off the road. Generally, in Iceland, a closed gate means no entry. Unless there is ...


9

The Icelandic National Museum had a temporary exhibition in 2012 for the 40th anniversary together with the Icelandic Chess Federation to commemorate the event where they showed (among others) the original tournament board, table and chairs. After that, they moved the artifacts to the newly opened Bobby Fisher Center in Selfoss, where he is also buried. So ...


9

The Arctic seas are unforgiving. The conditions are likely to change from day to day and even from hour to hour. You can ask the ferry operator, but with a 4 hour one way trip they probably don't make more than one trip per day so they'll be getting their info second hand too. That particular ferry route is on open, unprotected waters so it is possible ...


8

Yes it is, and it's pretty good. I'm involved in a project that does lots of research on Glaciers (project link) and as such we spend a couple of weeks there a year. For the last couple of years we've been staying at a farm near Hofn (15km away) and we've used a vodafone 3G dongle to provide internet access for 10/11 people, and whilst it's not be ...


8

Vodafone Iceland has this option: buy a prepaid card for 1000 ISK (~$8), and use 500 ISK from this credit to receive a 300 MB data pack. Additional info and rates on their official page. As far as coverage goes, GSM access is available on the whole island, while 3G is mostly limited to, uh, "urbanized" areas of Iceland. See the map for details. My Iceish ...


8

The only car ferry to Iceland leaves from Hirtshals, Denmark, so you have to somehow get to Denmark first. So the fastest way is to drive to Dover, take the Channel tunnel to Calais, then travel over Antwerp, Duisburg and Hamburg to Hirtshals. There take the car ferry to Reykjavik. London→Hirtshals takes approximately 14 hours. Hirtshals→Reykjavik really ...


8

There was a flight from North America a few years ago -- Baltimore airport, to be precise -- but it was cancelled after less than a year. It seemed to me that Air Greenland had chosen poorly, since they ran the flight all through the fall and winter, but finally gave it up as too expensive in the early spring, because not enough people were booking. But ...


8

There are a lot of possible day trips from Reykjavik to explore the surrounding area. If you only have the chance to do one I would suggest the Golden Circle, the tour will pick you up from your hotel and return you to it at the end of the day. During the day you will see geysir - the water spout that others are named after. Whilst geysir doesn't erupt ...


8

No. The most recent theme park to have to closed down in Iceland (back in 1994) was in Hveragerði but nothing remains of it today. It wasn't even much of a theme park, the rides were mostly of the mobile variety. No roller coasters or such. There was an older one that operated in 1946 and shut down in 1965. Nothing remains of that either. If you want to ...


8

Layers. Bring several. The average temperatures you quote are very misleading. Two years ago I was there in July and, while I would concur with the average, temperatures varied between 4C and 20C. That means that I used a thin long-sleeve top and was slightly hot around noon and was quite cold with a jacket, sweater plus long-sleeve top at night. Light ...


7

I don't know why there are no road maps of Iceland - but to answer the implied question of other ways of getting Iceland maps the following may be helpful. When I've needed navigation data for Iceland I've used Open Street Map, on a Garmin device. It looks like it should be possible to get them to work on a TomTom for more details see the TomTom page on ...


7

Best weather is during summer time. What I call mild is what is the average summer in Iceland. The long days make it possible to do more in one day. That does stroke with #4 though. Also some roads (to the north) close after heavy snowfall around October/November, which makes it harder to get around the country. I estimate the tourist season to end at the ...


7

Wild camping is permissible as long as you maintain a respectful distance from homes etc, but in some places it might difficult to find good spots to put up a tent close to the road. Based on my experience, the best spots are found taking side roads a little bit off the main ring road. Near populated areas you can usually find official camping sites (check ...



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