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15

There's a question about this on Skeptics-SE: The accepted answer gave two examples of people being deported for lying on their forms, including one who didn't mention her history with the SS when she applied for a visa in 1959, and the DoJ caught up with her in 2004 and deported her.


11

Congratulations, you've discovered that tourists can be admitted to the US for up to a year, which (unfortunately for you) is so rarely done that it's possible the immigration officer you see when you arrive might not know he can do it. The first thing I would consider if I were you is: Will it take you more than six months? If you're both in good shape and ...


11

Well firstly, it's a way of stating objections the US has to certain people entering their country. That makes a legal basis. It's their way of saying to every person, upfront "if you do this, we don't want you here". To most of us, that makes no difference, but those who say, have committed genocide or have communicable diseases are made aware of it. It'...


8

I acctually just found what I was looking for: According to US CBP at I94 FAQ: https://i94.cbp.dhs.gov/I94/request.html Q: If I arrive via air but leave via land - thus I dont have paper form I-94 - how to report departure? A: If you have a paper form I-94 and depart by land, you can turn the form into Canadian Border Services Agency (CBSA) upon entry into ...


7

Almost certainly your "exit" was recorded when you left the country, despite the fact that they didn't take the card. The airline provides these details to the US government, and they are tracked using that rather than the I-94 itself (this is one of the reasons that the I-94 cards are no longer used when entering by air). Your can confirm this by going to ...


6

I emailed the embassy of the USA (in the city I was staying before I visited the US), and their answer was that once I left the US soil, there is no procedure to report a departure in case of lost I94. They added that a stamp obtained when entering another country (crossing the land border to Canada in my case) was enough to prove I left the USA. For a ...


6

You can apply to replace a lost I-94 by filing I-102. It's very expensive though. It might be worth checking the I-94 website in case they have it there, in which case you can print it out; though it's unlikely in your case. How are you leaving the U.S.? According to this page, if you leave by air, you don't have to turn in an I-94. But if you leave by land,...


5

On the website of the I-94, in the FAQ, it details in what cases your departure is recorded or not, when you got an electronic I94 at the port of entry. If you leave the USA by air or by sea, your departure is recorded electronically. You do not need to specifically turn in the I-94 or any procedure : If you are departing by air or sea, your departure ...


5

You don't need to worry, as it's all done electronically and automatically now, so you don't need to do anything yourself. From the CBP page I-94 Goes Electronic: Foreign visitors to the U.S. arriving via air or sea no longer need to complete paper Customs and Border Protection Form I-94 or I-94W. Those who need to prove their legal-visitor status—...


5

I've never been in the exact situation you describe, but Visa Waivers are a very low-maintenence way to get in. My advice would be to explain to the immigration officer when you go into the US. I'm pretty sure the answer will be that they will give you a new I94W on the spot (with of course a new fee, if they still do that). You backup plan would be that ...


4

According to the current version of this CBP FAQ: If the traveler departs through an airport or sea, they will not need to turn in their form, as Customs and Border Protection (CBP) will receive the information electronically from the airlines. However, this information may only apply to departures now (mid-2014), and not earlier like in August ...


4

Short answer: You've already done everying you can do to make sure you won't have trouble, aside from bringing a copy of the evidence of your departure when you next come to the United States. More detail: The purpose of the I-94 is to connect your departure record with your entry record. When it is not returned, it appears as if you have overstayed your ...


3

He can stay until September. The visa expiration date is the date by which one must enter the US. See, for example, https://travel.state.gov/content/visas/en/general/visa-expiration-date.html. In particular: Admission to the United States and your Duration of Stay Upon arriving at a port of entry, the CBP official will determine the length of ...


3

The absolute theoretical maximum for the initial admission period for B-1 and B-2 is 1 year, according to the regulations. However, a regular visitor on B-2 will get 6 months, or in some uncommon cases, less than 6 months if the officer thinks the person has been to the US too often; but I have never heard of it being more than 6 months, probably because ...


2

I always leave any stapled stubs and whatnot in my passport, and don't mess with them. In your case, the next time you enter the US the immigration officer will probably take the remaining I-94 (and perhaps ask you what happened when you actually left from that visit). If they don't take it then they probably don't care, since they've migrated to the ...


1

I know I can return back to US under AVR(Automatic Visa Revalidation) even though my Visa stamp on the passport is expired as I have valid I94 status till 2018. I also know that If I had an unexpired visa stamp on the passport then for sure I would not need a Mexican tourist visa. But with expired visa stamp on passport and valid I-94 status, I am not sure ...


1

So, if I don't leave the US, I can stay until april 21, 2016 without having an overstay, correct? Yes. The valid dates of your visa (up to December 24th, 2015) is the date up to which you can enter the US. Upon entry, your stamp will tell you the date that you are to leave by. What is, if I leave the US. I have to visit my family for Christmas and like ...


1

It requires some explanation but it is not unusual. It was actually my toughest CBP interview so far (at about 2 minutes of questioning, so I wouldn't worry too much). Once the guy found the Canadian border entry stamp he seemed happy about it. No documents or other information was sought from me, just a coherent explanation of how this had happened and ...



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