New answers tagged

0

Consider using a foot stool when you are on the toilet to keep your feet elevated. The result should be kind of like this. It doesn't put your weight on your knees but puts your body in the more familiar position. Of course, you could also consider getting one of these: https://www.amazon.ca/Squatty-Potty-Original-Bathroom-Toilet/dp/B007BISCT0


2

The joys of English mean there's no actual word as such for the room in question. Everything is a euphemism. a mild or indirect word or expression substituted for one considered to be too harsh or blunt when referring to something unpleasant or embarrassing. Which means that just about anything on the list is valid. Americans seem to like Restroom ...


1

Many years ago, a coworker (new at that time) mentioned to me in a matter-of-fact way that he intends to visit the boys' corner. I was confused and asked him what he meant, to which he translated it as "toilet". I was amused with the realisation! It may not be a polite way of inquiring with the other gender, though!


4

I'm Australian. We like directness. Among friends we can be very blunt: "Where's the dunny?" Among foreigners we tone it down to merely informational and if we think the other person might be offended we use a more discreet low tone and start with a warning about impending directness: "I don't know the local polite form so I'm going to be direct. Where is ...


3

If your looking for a universal way that fits all circumstances, your best bet is going to be to ask someone. Your going to be the guest of someone. Even in a store you have the employees to help. So find someone that looks like they know the place, or better yet, invited you, and quietly, discreetly, let them know what your looking for. Then listen to the ...


3

Disposable Portable Urinal I use Travel John for tent camping and have one in my car for emergencies. It's very small when folded, the bag is filled with a powder that turns into a gel so you won't spill anything. You can also add more to it later, the gel will absorb more liquids as well. The powder has some chemicals in it to neutralize the smell. ...


8

The politest thing to do is to not draw attention to the fact that you need the toilet. Don't indicate to all and sundry that you need the toilet. If you need to know where the toilet is, ask where is the toilet/restroom/bathroom/lavatory, please? If you are desperate to go during a meeting or conversation, quietly excuse yourself at an opportune moment ...


3

I had this case once when driving with my children back from vacation. By driving I mean sitting in the middle lane of a huge traffic jam. Obviously, this was precise moment when the younger one absolutely had to pee (even though I asked 7 times if he was done at the last stop. But I digress). The solution I found is to have him "do it" into a box of ...


0

This solution works only for males. Karl Pilkington proposes a solution in this video: https://youtu.be/rt2h8jSdxHY Store a hot water bottle under your passenger seat. When necessary, relieve yourself in that. The advantages (from the video) are: large storage capacity wide rim to prevent, er, spillage


3

It pretty much depends on which part of the world you are in. Your choice of words could be limited by their command of English and their history (e.g. an American colony in the following example). I remember arriving to Ninoy Aquino International Airport in Manila, and asking to a member of the airport crew where could I go to the loo, wc, gents, ...


35

In the United States, the more polite terms I hear are usually either the restroom or the ladies' room/men's room (always including room). Washroom sounds Canadian to me. British terminology (such as loo) may well be understood but would sound odd. So, I might ask: "Where's the restroom?" If I already knew, I'd most likely excuse myself without explanation. ...


5

Just indicate that you need to wash your hands. That usually gets the idea across in polite society.


9

If I am looking for the toilet in an establishment I usually ask for the bathroom or the men's/women's room. My understanding is that the term bathroom is perceived as less crude than the word toilet hence why I don't user the latter. If I am at a formal event, such as a black tie dinner, I usually just say "excuse me" and then stand up and leave. No need ...


18

This question has been asked twice on English SE, the second in a British English context: “Toilet”, “lavatory” or “loo” for polite society Is there a formal way to say we want to go to the toilet? [closed] Too summarize that, loo or a bit more polite lavatory would be perfectly fine in the UK, while bathroom can be slightly confusing. People are more ...


2

Ok, this seems like a silly question, but I will give it a try. In the US, if your not on the interstate system, then you likely won't have this problem. There are few "traveled" roads, that don't have small towns and what not along the path. They do exist, specially in the rocky mountain regions. Adjust the answer as needed. Number 1 Pull off an exit, ...


3

You did not mentioned any specific country, so I adjust the answer accordingly. When I mention "yourself", it includes children, life partners and all other people fighting with the problem. 1. Be aware if it is ok to relieve oneself in public and simply leave the car when possible Some cultures are more permissive and see the inevitability of the ...


7

My ex-husband drove a work truck for 2 1/2 hrs each way to the job site on the Los Angeles freeway system every day while drinking a thermos of coffee. One day he showed me his method. Drilled a hole through the floor board, stuck one end of rubber tubing into the hole, put a funnel on the other end. While driving he would "whip it out" and go into the ...


12

Honestly, adult incontinence products are inexpensive, highly effective, comfortable and hygienic. For example, a packet of 15 iD Slip Maxi all-in-one briefs (essentially adult diapers) costs £10 (66 p each), holds about 3-4 litres of urine, is dermatologically tested, safe, discrete, and comfortable. Glider and fighter pilots use such products, as do ...


9

An English male friend of mine always has several small milk bottles in the car, neck of which are big enough to allow them to be used as 'hospital bottles' and the tops are closing well enough to keep the contents in when done properly. Store them top up when used to make double sure. Select the size of the milk bottles based on need. Me, a female, ...


6

Find the nearest place to stop safely and get out of the car... Having traveled a LOT by car, including with/as small children, that's always been an option. If someone has such serious problems holding their bladder, invest in diapers (which exist for adults as well).


22

A well prepared fighter pilot driver will be equipped with a Urine Collection Device (UCD) A typical UCD consists of a small container with a dehydrated sponge inside, connected to a tube which in turn is connected to a funnel-like orifice that is adapted to the user's anatomy (different designs are used for men as compared to women). The user ...


37

Bring a towel or blanket, some baby wipes, and optionally a small trowel or a stick you picked up along the way. A few small plastic bags are also helpful. If someone (especially a small child) can't wait until you can exit, pull over at a safe spot. A safe spot has a shoulder significantly wider than the car, and you pull as far off as you can without ...


5

Any almost all North African and Middle Eastern countries Bidet serves simple purpose of washing legs which is a mandatory prerequisite for Muslim prayer


5

You use it for cleaning your genital and anal areas. This may be BEFORE social (or sexual) meetings or after those areas become in need of cleaning (just a long day since you showered, after sex, exercise, bowel movements or urination, during your menstruation,,, basically when you feel you need it.) I suspect with the widespread adoption of panty pads, that ...


13

Bidets are in almost every bathroom here (Argentina), excepting public places. Their main usage is for anal (both sexes) and genital (women mostly) cleaning. They can replace or (more commonly) complement the toilet paper. Not everyone uses them, though. Other answers have covered the usage instructions. I wish to add some socially relevant points about ...


2

In spain is pretty common to have a bidet in the bathroom as many others have already answered, the use of it it's up to you, I personally only use it after some liquid dump, those that let you shivering and your bottom on fire... I squat on the bidet, point the faucet to my bottoms and power it up with some cool water in order to clean it up, after soaked ...


73

I'm Portuguese and every bathroom has a bidet. Only the really small ones don't. It is something I find in European countries with Latin roots (specially Portugal, Spain, France and Italy). From personal experience and of others, it is not commonly used, although useful on those few times. The main uses are to clean: Your feet: Sometimes you come home ...


17

As living in Southern Europe, bidets are pretty much ubiquitous at any home setting. Outside homes, they are only normally present in women's wcs, as it is assumed they have got to clean up themselves especially in that time of the month. I pretty much do not feel confy with them, and use only in those nasty days I go too many times to the toilet; ...


43

I won't add to the above answers, which have mostly covered the "What is it, how do I use it?" questions, so I'll go straight for the etiquette Bonus question: What is the social aspect of bidet usage in countries where they are widespread? Is it implicitly assumed everybody uses this device on a weekly/daily/hourly basis? It's like any other personal ...


5

Before you start, shake water off your hands. Faced with a drier I know to be feeble, I use a flicking motion where I tuck all fingers under the thumb then spread them wide, several times. Do this over the sink, not the floor ;-) While under the air, your hands should be in motion at all times. There are two motions to combine/alternate. Motion 1 is to cup ...


1

Shake, rub, turn while shaking and rubbing. The little known secret is a certain hop on one foot that completes the drying action -- wait, it is not. I mention the hop because there is actually a secret: once you've warmed and partially dried your hands this way a little wipe on the clothes, bachelor style, will very quickly get your formerly wetted skin ...


6

My understanding, having asked and been given a partial, embarrassed answer, would be that you assume a squatted position over the fixture, without lower body contact, then use the supplied water flow to wash your functional areas after discharging waste in the otherwise appropriate receptacle. Clear yet vague? Typically there is no paper supplied, so the ...


74

Bidet Who Are You? The bidet is a sanitary installation which looks like a shallow toilet bowl with water taps. The purpose of the bidet is to clean up after you've done what you came to do in the toilet. The rationale here is that sometimes toilet paper isn't enough and you can't always shower after you went to the toilet. Enters: the bidet. I feel like I ...


3

I share your frustration with such dryers, which to me are strictly inferior in almost every way to simply providing paper towels. As indicated by Sam, part of the trick is to not have very wet hands to start with. And, as noted by Zach, one usually winds up using a slightly less-sanitary method of drying the hands. Personally, I split the difference. I ...


6

The aim is to maximise the surface area of the water on your hands, so keep spreading the remaining water all over your hands, especially to those parts that have already dried. Tease out the water between your fingers as this water is often the last to dry out.


3

Your feeling that the period the air comes out is too long and the inability to get your hands completely dry are directly related. Yes, it takes more time to dry your hand with hot air that with a towel. You need to rub your hands for about 1 minute in hot air to get them dry. Just avoid using the toilet 5 minutes before your train/bus/etc. is leaving, or ...


31

Shake your hands to remove as much water as possible. Hold one hand with the back of the hand close to the air stream until it is dry. Swap hands, dry the back of the other hand. Rub your hands together to get the back of both hands wet again. Repeat until both hands are dry. This method is optimal because the large flat convex surface of the back of ...


4

Not that I find the new air-jet dryers much better, but if I find one of these old models in a bath room and there are no paper towels there, I usually seek a toilet cubicle after washing my hands and grab some toilet paper to dry off.


28

My experience is that you don't use them. They work poorly, which is why they are generally being replaced with newer more efficient dryers or removed altogether. In theory, you can use them by pressing the button, then rubbing your hands together underneath in the airflow. If you're extremely patient and do this for long enough, you should eventually wind ...


2

A friend of mine had a knee operation in May three years running and had to wear a cast on the leg till well into September. One place she visited in those three summers was Taizé France, where most of the toilets were squat toilets. The porceline square with steps a bit higher than the main square. While there were 'sit' toilets those were always a lot ...


2

Buy a plastic chair with four legs. Make a hole in the centre. Place it over the squat toilet. Be careful not to fall in. You are good to go. The plastic molded chair is widely available. Buy one with short legs or cut the legs off to shorten them. The chair is exactly the same width as a squat toilet width.


20

You could buy a portable camping commode and not use the bag. Here's one for sale on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B000CN9CN6


8

For a very short period after my family moved back from the UK to my home country, and while my grandmother was still alive, we used to spend time at her (my father's ancestral) home, which until we refitted it, still used a squatting toilet. Being a bit on the chubby side and totally unprepared from such a thing in general, I found great trouble using them ...



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