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1

I consult for a hostel and am involved directly in pricing decisions. We provide the basics as part of the base price; clean sheets, a pillow, and a blanket. We currently provide towels on request but we are moving to a model where we charge five dollars. We also to plan to offer a comfort package in the future that includes a more expensive comforter ...


2

In theory, such unbundled (or à la carte) pricing benefits the consumer. Those consumers who are happy to go without bedding (and despite your skepticism, I'm sure some such consumers exist) are not forced to subsidise those consumers who want it. Everyone pays for exactly what he wants and the market works efficiently. It's like those airlines that charge ...


16

Sometimes you pay per-night for the bed, but per-stay for the bedding. So if you stay for 3 nights and reuse the same bedding you will only get charged once for the bedding. The separate charging then makes sense, as they are charging you the cost of washing the bedding. (EasyHotel operates a bit like this, in that you have to pay for your bedding to be ...


47

Some Stats I ran some stats for you (from our data on Hostelz.com, a travel website that I represent) and currently 97% of hostels provide free bedsheets, and the remaining 3% charge a fee. Towels are a different matter. Currently 50.5% of hostels include free towels, 46.9% charge a fee, and 2.6% don't offer towels at all. The History Over the long ...


5

This is a problem of information asymmetry: In contract theory and economics, information asymmetry deals with the study of decisions in transactions where one party has more or better information than the other. This creates an imbalance of power in transactions, which can sometimes cause the transactions to go awry, a kind of market failure in the ...


10

The answer is simple: because they can. It's a good business idea to charge you extra because: It cuts down a bit on their laundry costs, as some travelers will save every penny. It makes their prices more attractive on hostel websites. Because let's face it: many people just end up booking whatever is cheapest. Most travelers won't even notice the extra ...


0

From my experience on a transatlantic flight: First they knock: knock, knock, we are landing sir. Me: OK. Few minutes later: they knock more: knock, knock, knock, we are landing sir, you need to return to your seat. Me: I need 5 minutes. Few minutes later: they bang on the door: bang, bang, bang, SIR, YOU NEED TO RETURN TO YOUR SEAT IMMEDIATELY!!!!!!!. ...


2

In MRT stations with bathrooms inside the station, you can ask the station personnel and they should let you in to use it. Convenience stores are hit and miss. Larger ones and ones outside of cities are more likely to have them, and some even have a toilet icon on the sign outside. Smaller ones in the city are unlikely to have them, but you can still ask. ...


1

This may be sounds strange but I think it depends a little bit on how cold the water is. I spend some time in a small hut in the Alps and the only water supply came via a tube from a small river nearby. I think the temperature of the water was below zero. First days I heated it up on the oven. Some lazy day in a boastful manner I decided to just use the ...


3

Why not? They do a pretty good job too. I ran out of laundry detergent while away for a 2 month travel and unfortunately nearby shop ran out of laundry detergent (it was in an isolated area). I substituted by using Lux bath soaps (they are all that's available). Leave my clothes smelling good and got rid of the stains too. I rub the soap on the wet ...


5

The main difference between liquid soap and dish washer detergent is price. So not a good idea in general, but only because liquid soap is more expensive. One recipe for liquid soap is given here – note olive oil, coconut oil, essential oils. Some of the ingredients for a well-known brand of washing liquid are listed here – note Sodium laureth sulphate, ...



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