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7

This isn't, so far as I can tell, any kind of travel jargon. It looks the standard definition of in-house used in any kind of business: Done or existing within an organization That is, if you want to book a room directly through the hotel itself, use the contact information provided. Presumably, you could also book the room through a third party like a ...


2

The issue got resolved thanks to @pnuts and @CMaster. In short, I think the very first comment from pnuts - which I would accept as the answer if pnuts were to post it as an answer - fully answers the question: First raise it with the Hotel because it may be easiest Credit Card Company next, because they can impose a short time cut-off for disputed ...


8

Based on the details, the hotel didn't overcharge you at all. The hotel charged you the amount they stated (admittedly in GBP, but I suspect the amount that at standard rates is the same as in your chosen currency). Your card issuer charged you currency conversion costs (and possibly other fees). It's worth being very careful which cards you use abroad - ...


2

@kenorb Hi, my name is Artem, I actually work at Happyrooms. Found this post occasionally. I'm extremely sorry for this issue. Here is the list of things I will do: Could you please write me your booking # or first and last name — I'll make sure we refund you. I'll make sure we block this hotel sales on our website. I'll make sure our Spanish partner ...


0

In Japan, unlike most of the world, you pay per person, not per room, for most hotels. So for instance, if I travel alone on business to a hotel, it will be ¥6,000/night/person (assuming two guests). If I actually try to reserve it for one person, it will likely be a little bit more (maybe ¥6,500/night) for the exact same room. This does not make sense at ...


4

In places where hotels are required to register their guests with the local authorities, they will ask for the ID of all guests. Hence all guests might not need to be present to check-in, but their ID's will. Other hotels might just ask for one ID. This is assuming that all guests begin their stay on the same night. In your specific case you should not ...


2

Yes, strikes and demostrations are common in Kerala, but are absolutely peaceful. There are no safety reasons to be afraid to find a demostration or to live an strike day. To understand why there are no safety concerns, you have to understand that these acts are due a curios political situation: Kerala government is communist and India central government is ...


0

In America you can basically wear whatever you want in any situation.... Especially since you're a paying customer at a hotel, it would be VERY rare for you to get anything but, at worst, weird looks. (As long as you aren't actually exposing your genitals. If you are, indecent exposure probably will land you on a sex offender list for years.) It's America. ...


1

Few reliable options for you would be TripAdvisor Makemytrip Goibibo Expedia But one thing which I always do after selecting a hotel from these sites is to check for the hotel's independent website and see if a booking option is available on it. If it is present, then a booking can be made easily through the hotel's page and you could confirm your ...


5

Any public strikes that takes place in India, do not affect the tourist areas at all. Most of the strikes if at all, are concentrated around government buildings and offices and as a tourist you should not face any difficulty in finding food and lodging places. That being said, let me assure you that strikes are not very common and do not affect the day to ...



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