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48

Taking Complimentaries Home I would say that it all boils down to how cheap you want to look, in the eyes of the hotel management. If you don't care, and probably you shouldn't, then there are some things you can take with you upon check-out. Taking Consumables As a general rule I would say: you can take anything that is single-serving. For the purpose ...


47

In the US, it really depends on where you are staying. In a big hotel in a city, it would be expected that you wear street clothes or even casual business wear in the public areas. Granted you could get away with wandering down the hall to get some ice or a soda from the vending machine in your pajamas, but lounging in the lobby or a reading room and ...


40

There are a few things you have to consider. I worked before at a hotel refilling those minibars. So I know a bit of how it works. Some hotels have an electronic system. This system registers if something has been taken from the minibar. Please note them some people replace a can of coke (or take it out and after putting it back) and the system will see ...


32

I worked in a variety of hotels and hostels when I was a young backpacker and student. The simple answer is that it comes down to availability of rooms (or beds if you're staying in a dormitory). Most hotels will post a check-in time of around noon to give them time to get at least some some rooms ready for the earlier arrivals, but even that should never ...


28

If the flush mechanism doesn't work Flush manually: In fact in many developing countries or even elsewhere such as out in the bush you can find modern toilets without running water. All you need to do is find a large container, fill at as full as you can manage, and pour it into the bowl. The faster you poor and from the greater height the better. But ...


27

In many hotels you can just drop your keys in a box on your way out (or leave them in your room) and the charges will go to the credit card on file. Should you become aware that the card won't work, one approach would simply be to stay as long as you had intended, pack your bags, and just leave. Undoubtedly the hotel will call or email you within a few days ...


25

Well I'm a bit of a sub-expert on this, having worked nine years in the hostelling industry and encountering them as a traveller once in India. There's a bit of a dirty little secret in the hospitality industry about just how bad the bed bug problem has been for the past few years. Apparently all the big/expensive hotel chains have been having problems - ...


25

Assuming a mature system of law and a country where the police is not commonly corrupt and debts not commonly collected by violent means: Are they allowed to hold your passport until you come back and pay? No, unless you agree to it as a means of quickly, cheaply and unbeaurocratically settling the issue. What happens if they call the police? The ...


24

Your pricing looks like a business traveler oriented hotel in a bigger city. Their prices tend to follow the bell curve during an average week, lowest on Friday & Saturday nights (as business travelers have mostly gone home) increasing towards mid week, then back down to the "weekend" prices. You likely would see opposite pricing schemes at a beach ...


22

what is expected of me while I stay there If someone carries your luggage to your room, they expect a tip ($1 to $2 per bag). It's also customary to leave a tip for the maid ($1 to $3 per day). Otherwise, it's really the other way round: it's the job of the hotel staff to meet your expectations (within reasonable bounds) - you're paying, after all. ...


20

Those are the rates for the days of your stay, not the time that you order. Most hotels have higher prices during times of high-demand, and often higher rates on weekends, etc.


19

There are probably well over a hundred real castles converted to hotels in Europe - maintaining a castle is expensive, so most people who own one need to monetize it somehow. Here's a German site that lists 40 castles and palaces converted into hotels in Germany alone... The question is: how historical do you want it to be to count as "real"? Older than ...


19

California, USA is one place where you see these posted rates. I believe this is to comply with Civil Code Section 1863: (a) Every keeper of a hotel, inn, boardinghouse or lodginghouse, shall post in a conspicuous place in the office or public room, and in every bedroom of said hotel, boardinghouse, inn, or lodginghouse, a printed copy of this ...


19

The answer will vary from country to country and from hotel to hotel, but in general you're not allowed to do this and if the hotel finds it out, they can kick you out or charge you a fine. In some countries they can even throw you in prison (worst case). For example in the USA there is the Defrauding an innkeeper law: A person who, with intent to ...


19

Actual practice varies widely by country, but there are (at least) four reasons why hotels frown on having more guests in a room than you originally told them. Fire code. Hotels and rooms are rated for maximum occupancy: if they get busted for having two people in a room for one, or (worse) 101 guests in a hotel rated for 100, there are serious legal ...


19

Rick Steves has a post on this and his answer comes down to: Interpret hoteliers’ reticence as “I have lots of good furniture and fine floors in this room, and I don’t want your drippy laundry ruining things.” But as long as you wash carefully and are respectful of the room, go right ahead. It's also possible they want to save on water, but then ...


19

If you paid by credit card, dispute the invalid charge immediately with your credit card company/bank and let them handle it. You'll get the money back quickly, and it becomes their problem from then on. If you did not pay by credit card, things get more difficult. If you're still in Thailand, contact the Tourist Police, who should be able to help you ...


19

The only realistic answer to this question is that there is no answer. Standards of dress in the US are not standardized, except in certain contexts like prisons, the military, certain types of business, Catholic schools, and fancy restaurants. Circa 1960 was the last time in the US when there was some kind of general consensus on what was proper dress in ...


18

Short answer: no. In North America, public spaces require public dress. You would not, for example, wear a swimsuit to the restaurant. Asia is a bit more relaxed - you can walk around a Japanese resort town in what amounts to a housecoat.


17

I believe, all jokes aside, you have four options: Try to ignore it. Obviously, you're trying this already and it's not working. But you could turn the tv on, listen to some music, or take a sleeping tablet if you have one. Passive aggressive behaviour. Turn the tv or music up really loudly. Bang on the wall. Hope they'll take the hint. Cheer them on! ...


17

This happened to us a few times. Credit card companies can be very fickle things, they allowed someone that wasn't us to pay for $500 worth of CDs across the world, but blocked a local hotel we were staying at from finalizing the charge for our room. When we travel, we generally only bring one credit card to minimize the potential pain of losing our stuff, ...


17

One thing to consider is that, despite what common sense or simplistic views of economic theory might suggest, many businesses actually rely to a large extent on the customers' honesty. For example, I have worked at a café in an area with many tourists (i.e. people we don't know and who have no reason to fear having a bad reputation or being denied service ...


16

You have bumped into one of the Spanish habits. In Spain there are a lot of people that wake up early just to leave their things at the beach/pool and then go back to bed. It's like planting a flag saying "hey, this is my territory and you should keep away". I hate this behaviour of my fellow countrymen. What to do? At the beach, there is a recent law that ...


16

Because they are not used. The vast majority of people do not use them. With luggage of course not. Elderly, handicapped, non-sporty people neither. The staff does not use them since they have to use the service lift. I am personally always surprised how many people prefer to wait for and take an elevator even if an escalator exists to go up/down only one ...


16

Practically every hotel I've had experience with (and the vast majority are budget hotels or hostels) permit an early check in if the room is ready. If it's not, they'll usually have no problem holding your bags for you until the room is ready, so you can drop off your things and go get lunch or see the town in the mean time. If you're ever in a situation ...


15

An "Opaque" booking is one where you don't know the exact details of what you're booking until after you've made the booking. The most common form of opaque bookings are for hotels, but they also exist for flights. There two general formats of booking sites for opaque hotels - those that work on a "bidding" concept, and those that have a fixed price. ...


15

Heck, if I arrive in my destination, I'm checking in. Hostel, B&B, hotel, never had a problem. Generally the only issue is that the room may not be ready. No problem, most of them have a place to store your bags, and then I'm free to explore the city or do whatever I wanted to do, and then come back later on and go to my room. The only time it was ...


15

Stay at a hostel. You shouldn't have any trouble due to your young age. You will have to buy a hostel membership, either an annual or temporary one. But the nightly fee will probably be less expensive than most hotels anyway. There is one in Syracuse. Here's the link to check availability: ...


14

The biggest problem with hotel wi-fi (and conference centre wi-fi) is us. Travelling nerds who need 2 or 3 IP addresses each (and try to do their work each evening while regular people are watching TV) typically bring these systems to their knees. I've had so many hotel people tell me they never get complaints like these the rest of the year, and I actually ...


14

Hôtel de Crillon, suite Bernstein (fr). (image from www.drivingadelorean.com) Have a nice stay!



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