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31

Enjoy a nice lunch at one of the restaurants. 3 hours at any international airport is not enough time to leave. 30-60 minutes to deal with immigration, same again on the return (security, be at gate 30 minutes before departure etc. etc.) leaves you with an hour. Given HKG's location you won't be going anywhere.


20

On paper it's theoretically possible, in reality -- having flown into, out of and through HK a fair amount -- I doubt it will work unless you're extremely lucky. Assuming you want to get to your departure gate thirty minutes before take-off then you have 150 minutes of spare time. You might push that to getting to your gate twenty minutes before take off ...


20

As a foreigner residing in Hong Kong, I would actually advise you not to worry about the language since majority of the people speak English. You will not have any communication problems unless you visit a few remote areas or when you deal with Mainland Chinese tourists and a few locals who do not speak English (Some of them speak English too).


12

I have stayed at the Sheraton HK hotel (back in 2007), the one in Nathan road (that's the English name of the road if I remember correctly). The toilet is no different than any western style toilet. The hotel itself and its facilities are pretty decent.


11

The TSA is insane. They require gate checks for liquids on US-bound flights. I've encountered the same nonsense at the gate on every flight from Shanghai since they put the rule in place. Of course, without an x-ray it's not very effective. Here's a link from Cathay Pacific confirming this requirement to flights to the U.S. from Hong Kong.


10

I have not stayed at the Sheraton specifically but based on my experience with other Hong Kong hotels/venues, I am pretty sure you will find “Western” bathrooms there. But as far as (men's) toilet experience is concerned, in Hong Kong you must try The Peninsula, more specifically its bar (you can go there even if you can't afford the hotel).


10

I would suggest you taking the advices from Wikitravel. Nevertheless, most locals under the age of 40 (and many over that as well) know enough English for basic communication. To improve your chances of being understood, speak slowly, stick to basic words and sentences, and avoid using slang. You may also speak Mandarin, which is also widely understood ...


9

I spent my semester abroad in Hong Kong (at HKUST) last year. Basically everybody speaks English, from taxi drivers to cashiers. Also road signs etc. are all in English as well. The students at HKUST did understand Mandarin, but were quite reluctant to speak with you in Mandarin, they definitely prefer English.


8

It depends on the hotel. Upscale ones, especially if they're western brands, will generally have western style (sit) toilets. Cheap hotels, especially if they're local or not a chain, will generally have eastern style (squat) toilets. It's easy to find your preferred style if you know where to look and can identify the clientele the hotel caters to. A large ...


8

The area next to Hong Kong-China Boundary in Hong Kong is Frontier Closed Area. Only permitted people can access it. If you want to cross the boundary, the cheapest way is Huangbus (皇巴士) from Huanggang Port to San Tin Public Transport Interchange. It costs $9 HKD, paid by cash or Octopus card. Dont expect to hitchhike in GuangDong. Each year many drivers ...


6

I can only think of two that would be easy to get to: Citygate Outlets is about 25 minutes away by bus - a wide range of shops, restaurants etc. On that route there is also the Ancient Kiln Park and Hkia Hostorical Garden. Asiaworld-Expo centre is less than 10 minutes away - check out the link for events that will be on when you are there.


6

I do not read Chinese very well and speak only at a conversational level, but I have never had problems in Hong Kong, even ignoring my ability to speak some Cantonese. Perhaps you already know this, but many public spaces (street signs, the bus or the metro, etc.) are bilingual. So are many "menus" at many "fast-food" chains I have seen. (To boot, I ...


5

No, it's not possible. Macau, while a part of China, is outside the Chinese visa area; if he leaves Zhuhai for Macau, his single-entry visa will be used up. See this similar question: Would China to Taiwan and back again count as another entry into China? His options are to a) get a Chinese double or multiple-entry visa, or b) return directly from Macau ...


5

According to the Hong Kong Immgration Department nationals of India are allowed to visit Hong Kong visa free for 14 days (see part II). Given that you will not be required to have a visa to transit either.


4

Google will find the opening hours and tell you that it closes at 6.30pm At other times the trip is possible in that amount of time, but busyness depends on time and season. You can reach the monastery and the Big Buddha without going up the cable car, but I don't know how long it takes to drive there.


4

US law says you must leave and enter the US with your US passport, but the US border officers do not actually look at the documents of people who are leaving, so they do not actually enforce that part of the rule. As for returning, as others have noted, you can get into the country with your naturalization certificate, though you may have to do more ...


4

people said I cannot go back the US without US passport, This is not correct. On one hand you must have a passport but there's no penalty for breaking this rule and more importantly, US citizens can't be denied entry into the USA if adequate proof is provided they are indeed citizens. There is no hard and fast rule here but the USCIS itself says ...


4

Turbojet has a ferry almost every hour, all night from Macau to Hong Kong Ferry Terminal. From there you can take a short taxi ride (you could also walk but it's a bit far) to the Airport Express station and the train to the Airport. It will make your trip about an hour longer than going directly to the airport via ferry, but it sure beats staying at the ...


4

Of course it has. All mid to upscale Hotel in China do these days especially if they are name brand. Same for restaurants. The only "hole in the ground" style toilets I've seen in the last 5 years are either in very rural areas or inside the factory for operators and line workers. Assuming you mean the Sheraton in Kowloon close to the harbor, it's really ...


4

The Sheraton is above my discretionary accommodation level - but based on what is provided at less salubrious establishments, I'd expect western toilets in en suites and just maybe a squat toilet or too in shared facilities - usually well labelled on the door. Even quite down-market Hong-Kong hotels are liable to have western-style toilets in en-suites. As ...


4

Hong Kong consists of a number of islands, and also a sizeable chunk of mainland, called the New Territories. The New Territories are the larger part of Hong Kong, but also the least densely populated, least interesting and least visited. Kowloon is a more populated and residential area, also part of the mainland, surrounded by the New Territories. Shenzhen ...


4

You should encounter absolutely no problems. Hong Kong immigration are both efficient and pleasant. I have resided in Hong Kong for over 9 years and hold permanent residency. We receive both family and business visitors who regularly tour the surrounding region. Recently a colleague holding a Thai passport entered HK on the 4 June, left for Dubai on 5 ...


4

I did some research and while it used to be possible to get this in Macau in the past, the company most people suggested: CTS does not offer this service anymore. They suggested their Hong Kong office. I contacted a different agency in HK suggested in another post on travel.stackexchange FBT, they said they don't need hotel bookings or return flights. ...


3

Your time frame precludes much, if not all, travel on the MTR, as you probably know. Train service starts a few minutes before 6:00. The easiest way to get there is to just take a taxi. It should cost around 350 HKD. Not cheap, but quick and simple. You could also take a bus. Not sure where exactly you are - Yuen Long is big area - but you most likely ...


3

Take a taxi to the nearest MTR Airport Express train station, which would be Tsing Yi or Kowloon. Then take the train. It takes 24 minutes to get to the airport, and service starts at 5:54. The fare is $60 (HKD) from Tsing Yi and $90 (HKD) from Kowloon. There are many buses that also go to the airport. You can find a full listing of them here.


3

There is no limit on buying duty free items, but there are limits on how much you can bring in duty free when you come home to the UK. As far as Hong Kong is concerned you can buy as much as you please. The limits on importing items into the UK will be per person, so you and your girlfriend each get an allotted amount and if you exceed that amount then ...


3

Ngong Ping 360 opens at 10am-6pm on weekdays, and 9am-630pm on weekends and public holidays. It will extend services hours to 7pm on weekends and holidays in July and August. Please note it will close on Scheduled Servicing Days. The closest one (at the time of writing, prior to any revisions) is from the 7th to the 24th of September. The trip lasts around ...


3

Only possibly on the 23rd, most likely not even then. First of all, shops and malls are usually open on Public Holidays in Asia. Second of all, there are some public holidays during the 20-28th December, but they will not affect tourists. Malls and Shops will be open, except maybe for a couple of privately run restaurants or shops. However, since Macau ...


3

This is what I ended up doing: I took the 3am ferry from Macau to Hong Kong Island. Outside the ferry terminal I caught the N11 bus directly to the airport. It took about one hour and cost 31 HK$ (4 USD). It runs every 30 minutes, I took the 4:20am one. I was a bit concerned that 20 minutes may not be enough time to get from the ferry through ...


3

Regarding to my search on google: In Hong Kong there are forty six point zero seven (46.07%) peoples are English speakers. The amount of English speakers are (3,136,784) And forty eight percent (48%) peoples in Hong Kong speaks Mandarin Mandarin overtakes English as Hong Kong's second language



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