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25

Walking directions for Google maps says yes, it's possible: https://goo.gl/maps/MVoPY 57 min, 4.6 km from Airport station to the center of Tung Chung. Now I haven't tried this myself, and walking directions remain officially in beta... but a random Street View sampling indicates that the suggested route does have pedestrian walkways of some kind, including ...


14

Hong Kong airport is on an island. There is nothing else on that islands except an exhibition center and related activities (ferry terminal, hotel, …). In order to go anywhere interesting, you need to cross to the neighboring island of Lantau, Tung Chung being the first neighborhood when going from the airport to anywhere overland. While I think there is a ...


10

A ferry is the only “normal” way to travel between Hong Kong and Macau (I think you can take a helicopter if you really want to spend a lot of money). There are multiple ferry links connecting different parts of Macau with different parts of Hong Kong. Given that you don't have all day, you should take the ferry straight from the Hong Kong airport when you ...


6

The TSA is insane. They require gate checks for liquids on US-bound flights. I've encountered the same nonsense at the gate on every flight from Shanghai since they put the rule in place. Of course, without an x-ray it's not very effective. Here's a link from Cathay Pacific confirming this requirement to flights to the U.S. from Hong Kong.


5

I don't see why there should be an issue. You are a Singaporean national and being a Malaysian Resident should not be an issue at all. Singaporean nationals are allowed to travel visa free to Hong Kong for up to 90 days, which I believe is lesser than your intended period of stay. From there, you are free to board a flight to Los Angeles (United States) ...


5

My reading of that -- and I'm obviously not a Chinese immigration bureaucrat -- is that she's probably OK without the visa, as long as you can make the trip out to be Malaysia->China->Malaysia via Hong Kong on both legs. From Malaysia to Hong Kong, as long as she claims to be going to Shenzhen or wherever, she is "in transit through Hong Kong" and "will go ...


5

I have a 4 hour stopover Which is not enough time to do much outside any major airport, especially on foot. Assuming the 4 hours is arrival to departure time, consider the following: get off airplane walk to immigration, wait in line walk to airport door. We are now at 30 minutes, more likely 60 leave airport property You have already checked in ...


5

Nothing to add to Gilles informative answer - it's fantastic information that there is a footbridge (but for the OP's question, a four hour stopover does appear to be too short). However, if you're staying at one of the the two airport hotels, such as the SkyCity Marriott, here's what would be a terrific "urban jog" which is a 10k, making the Novotel on the ...


5

Yes, it can get crowded! Buy your tickets in advance! Or it might be an hour and a half before you get on a ferry. [Note I base this answer on our experience on one particular Sunday, but it is reasonable to suppose that the situation is similar, at least on weekends, most of the year.] There are frequent departures (every 15 min), at least in the morning ...


5

It is not uncommon to see a sign that says (in Chinese) RMB, HKD, MOP same price. Example. My recommendation is that you just change your HKD (or RMB) to MOP -- there are money changers all over the place (at least in the touristy areas, which is where you'll probably be). Occasionally someone might be willing to round things down a little - example: a ...


5

The various Asian LCC (low-cost-carriers) airplane companies are the way to go. Check out Air Asia, Peach, Vanilla Air, etc. You should be able to travel for way less than US$300 return if you book at the right time. For example, this flight from Hong Kong to Osaka one way is less than US$120 on Peach: Similarly, this flight from Taipei to Tokyo one way ...


5

No ferries, much too far. Best you could do is a cruise ship, but the only ones that tend to do HK - Yokohama are the ultra-luxury ocean liners like the Queen Elizabeth, and then only once a year. If you have a lot of time there are some cargo lines that accept passengers. Cargo ship schedules are very flexible, you have to be ready to go when they say so. ...


4

According to the official website, entry permits (visa-on-arrival) are only valid for 30 days and you don't need one as an EU citizen. What you'll get is 90 days of visa-free stay. If you leave Macau, you will need to go through immigration when you come back and you could then theoretically be denied entry. The same website specifies that 2 ...


4

Yes, you can visit Hong Kong and re-enter. To be exact, as an EU citizen you do not need a visa for Macau, you will be granted a 90-day entry permit authorization to stay on arrival. Each individual authorization will end when you leave Macau, but you'll be granted a new one when you return. Beware that, if you keep doing this, you may eventually be ...


4

Yes, you do need a visa. While almost everybody can transit through HKIA visa-free, Pakistani passport holders belong to the "^" group where: All nationals (except holders of Diplomatic and Official passports) are required to hold a valid visa for the HKSAR for whatever purpose (including those who are in transit and remain on the airside). This ...


4

Turbojet has a ferry almost every hour, all night from Macau to Hong Kong Ferry Terminal. From there you can take a short taxi ride (you could also walk but it's a bit far) to the Airport Express station and the train to the Airport. It will make your trip about an hour longer than going directly to the airport via ferry, but it sure beats staying at the ...


4

Google will find the opening hours and tell you that it closes at 6.30pm At other times the trip is possible in that amount of time, but busyness depends on time and season.


3

The quick answer is "Yes, but you'll need to do different things depending where you're from". Hong Kong has different entry/visa requirements from China, in general it's much easier to get into Hong Kong. You can see the different country requirements on this page. So the chances are you will be able to get into Hong Kong. Then you can get the train, ...


3

All you need is the HK SAR passport. The page is worded that way because they can't say "nationals of Hong Kong": Hong Kong is a part of China, so there are no citizens of Hong Kong, only Chinese citizens of Hong Kong. And they also can't say "nationals of China", because that would give visa-free access to everybody in China. So they say "permanent ...


3

Thank you for the all guidance. I just want to share the real experience I had. bcz I assume, this will be helpful when someone needed. For the Direct Air-side Transits Visa, it takes around 8 working days for me.


3

To me this information is pretty clear. It just depends on where you apply. Up to 5 days if you apply in Hong Kong. Up to 40 days if you apply in Sri Lanka. Assuming that you are in Hong Kong now, you should obviously apply from there.


3

There is no limit on buying duty free items, but there are limits on how much you can bring in duty free when you come home to the UK. As far as Hong Kong is concerned you can buy as much as you please. The limits on importing items into the UK will be per person, so you and your girlfriend each get an allotted amount and if you exceed that amount then ...


3

No, it's not possible. Macau, while a part of China, is outside the Chinese visa area; if he leaves Zhuhai for Macau, his single-entry visa will be used up. See this similar question: Would China to Taiwan and back again count as another entry into China? His options are to a) get a Chinese double or multiple-entry visa, or b) return directly from Macau ...


3

This is what I ended up doing: I took the 3am ferry from Macau to Hong Kong Island. Outside the ferry terminal I caught the N11 bus directly to the airport. It took about one hour and cost 31 HK$ (4 USD). It runs every 30 minutes, I took the 4:20am one. I was a bit concerned that 20 minutes may not be enough time to get from the ferry through ...


3

Only possibly on the 23rd, most likely not even then. First of all, shops and malls are usually open on Public Holidays in Asia. Second of all, there are some public holidays during the 20-28th December, but they will not affect tourists. Malls and Shops will be open, except maybe for a couple of privately run restaurants or shops. However, since Macau ...


2

Forever Bright Trading is a reliable visa agent in HK who I have used in the past. They claim to be able to provide M visas with the following information, which doesn't sound too onerous: Document(s) required: Documents on the commercial activity issued by a trade partner in China, or trade fair invitation or other invitation letters issued by ...


2

Unless you want to be shared for a stop-over, you must limit yourself to 23:59 minutes. Most travel sites let you search for flights and sort by total duration. This will help you find the longest stop-over at the end of the list. What often happens with popular routes is that you will not be offered such a layover because there are enough shorter options. ...


2

According to TIMATIC (the Visa system the airline will likely use when you check-in) : Visa required, except for Holders of a PRC Travel Document (Lu Xing Zheng) containing an entry permit for Hong Kong (SAR China). Visa required, except for A max. stay of 7 days for: - holders of passports issued by China (People's Rep.), provided ...


2

Gilles did an excellent job of answering this. I just want to add a few things. A few years back my friend and I were staying in Macau and took the Turbo Jet to and from Hong Kong. It took about one hour and cost about $80 each way. We thought about taking a helicopter ride one way just for the experience but it was going to be $350 for a one way flight. The ...


2

As I just found out to my dismay at the airport, Australia-bound passengers are unable to buy, although there doesn't seem to be any liquids/security re-screening at the gate. The duty free cashiers told me I would have to buy on arrival. I have just looked up the price and it seems to be 30% higher at Melbourne airport duty free. Feel like I've been ...



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