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31

Enjoy a nice lunch at one of the restaurants. 3 hours at any international airport is not enough time to leave. 30-60 minutes to deal with immigration, same again on the return (security, be at gate 30 minutes before departure etc. etc.) leaves you with an hour. Given HKG's location you won't be going anywhere.


25

Walking directions for Google maps says yes, it's possible: https://goo.gl/maps/MVoPY 57 min, 4.6 km from Airport station to the center of Tung Chung. Now I haven't tried this myself, and walking directions remain officially in beta... but a random Street View sampling indicates that the suggested route does have pedestrian walkways of some kind, including ...


20

On paper it's theoretically possible, in reality -- having flown into, out of and through HK a fair amount -- I doubt it will work unless you're extremely lucky. Assuming you want to get to your departure gate thirty minutes before take-off then you have 150 minutes of spare time. You might push that to getting to your gate twenty minutes before take off ...


14

Hong Kong airport is on an island. There is nothing else on that islands except an exhibition center and related activities (ferry terminal, hotel, …). In order to go anywhere interesting, you need to cross to the neighboring island of Lantau, Tung Chung being the first neighborhood when going from the airport to anywhere overland. While I think there is a ...


12

I have stayed at the Sheraton HK hotel (back in 2007), the one in Nathan road (that's the English name of the road if I remember correctly). The toilet is no different than any western style toilet. The hotel itself and its facilities are pretty decent.


10

I have not stayed at the Sheraton specifically but based on my experience with other Hong Kong hotels/venues, I am pretty sure you will find “Western” bathrooms there. But as far as (men's) toilet experience is concerned, in Hong Kong you must try The Peninsula, more specifically its bar (you can go there even if you can't afford the hotel).


8

The TSA is insane. They require gate checks for liquids on US-bound flights. I've encountered the same nonsense at the gate on every flight from Shanghai since they put the rule in place. Of course, without an x-ray it's not very effective. Here's a link from Cathay Pacific confirming this requirement to flights to the U.S. from Hong Kong.


8

It depends on the hotel. Upscale ones, especially if they're western brands, will generally have western style (sit) toilets. Cheap hotels, especially if they're local or not a chain, will generally have eastern style (squat) toilets. It's easy to find your preferred style if you know where to look and can identify the clientele the hotel caters to. A large ...


6

I can only think of two that would be easy to get to: Citygate Outlets is about 25 minutes away by bus - a wide range of shops, restaurants etc. On that route there is also the Ancient Kiln Park and Hkia Hostorical Garden. Asiaworld-Expo centre is less than 10 minutes away - check out the link for events that will be on when you are there.


6

It is not uncommon to see a sign that says (in Chinese) RMB, HKD, MOP same price. Example. My recommendation is that you just change your HKD (or RMB) to MOP -- there are money changers all over the place (at least in the touristy areas, which is where you'll probably be). Occasionally someone might be willing to round things down a little - example: a ...


6

The various Asian LCC (low-cost-carriers) airplane companies are the way to go. Check out Air Asia, Peach, Vanilla Air, etc. You should be able to travel for way less than US$300 return if you book at the right time. For example, this flight from Hong Kong to Osaka one way is less than US$120 on Peach: Similarly, this flight from Taipei to Tokyo one way ...


6

No ferries, much too far. Best you could do is a cruise ship, but the only ones that tend to do HK - Yokohama are the ultra-luxury ocean liners like the Queen Elizabeth, and then only once a year. If you have a lot of time there are some cargo lines that accept passengers. Cargo ship schedules are very flexible, you have to be ready to go when they say so. ...


5

I don't see why there should be an issue. You are a Singaporean national and being a Malaysian Resident should not be an issue at all. Singaporean nationals are allowed to travel visa free to Hong Kong for up to 90 days, which I believe is lesser than your intended period of stay. From there, you are free to board a flight to Los Angeles (United States) ...


5

I have a 4 hour stopover Which is not enough time to do much outside any major airport, especially on foot. Assuming the 4 hours is arrival to departure time, consider the following: get off airplane walk to immigration, wait in line walk to airport door. We are now at 30 minutes, more likely 60 leave airport property You have already checked in ...


5

Nothing to add to Gilles informative answer - it's fantastic information that there is a footbridge (but for the OP's question, a four hour stopover does appear to be too short). However, if you're staying at one of the the two airport hotels, such as the SkyCity Marriott, here's what would be a terrific "urban jog" which is a 10k, making the Novotel on the ...


5

Yes, it can get crowded! Buy your tickets in advance! Or it might be an hour and a half before you get on a ferry. [Note I base this answer on our experience on one particular Sunday, but it is reasonable to suppose that the situation is similar, at least on weekends, most of the year.] There are frequent departures (every 15 min), at least in the morning ...


4

According to the official website, entry permits (visa-on-arrival) are only valid for 30 days and you don't need one as an EU citizen. What you'll get is 90 days of visa-free stay. If you leave Macau, you will need to go through immigration when you come back and you could then theoretically be denied entry. The same website specifies that 2 ...


4

Yes, you can visit Hong Kong and re-enter. To be exact, as an EU citizen you do not need a visa for Macau, you will be granted a 90-day entry permit authorization to stay on arrival. Each individual authorization will end when you leave Macau, but you'll be granted a new one when you return. Beware that, if you keep doing this, you may eventually be ...


4

Turbojet has a ferry almost every hour, all night from Macau to Hong Kong Ferry Terminal. From there you can take a short taxi ride (you could also walk but it's a bit far) to the Airport Express station and the train to the Airport. It will make your trip about an hour longer than going directly to the airport via ferry, but it sure beats staying at the ...


4

No, it's not possible. Macau, while a part of China, is outside the Chinese visa area; if he leaves Zhuhai for Macau, his single-entry visa will be used up. See this similar question: Would China to Taiwan and back again count as another entry into China? His options are to a) get a Chinese double or multiple-entry visa, or b) return directly from Macau ...


4

US law says you must leave and enter the US with your US passport, but the US border officers do not actually look at the documents of people who are leaving, so they do not actually enforce that part of the rule. As for returning, as others have noted, you can get into the country with your naturalization certificate, though you may have to do more ...


4

people said I cannot go back the US without US passport, This is not correct. On one hand you must have a passport but there's no penalty for breaking this rule and more importantly, US citizens can't be denied entry into the USA if adequate proof is provided they are indeed citizens. There is no hard and fast rule here but the USCIS itself says ...


4

Google will find the opening hours and tell you that it closes at 6.30pm At other times the trip is possible in that amount of time, but busyness depends on time and season. You can reach the monastery and the Big Buddha without going up the cable car, but I don't know how long it takes to drive there.


4

The Sheraton is above my discretionary accommodation level - but based on what is provided at less salubrious establishments, I'd expect western toilets in en suites and just maybe a squat toilet or too in shared facilities - usually well labelled on the door. Even quite down-market Hong-Kong hotels are liable to have western-style toilets in en-suites. As ...


4

Of course it has. All mid to upscale Hotel in China do these days especially if they are name brand. Same for restaurants. The only "hole in the ground" style toilets I've seen in the last 5 years are either in very rural areas or inside the factory for operators and line workers. Assuming you mean the Sheraton in Kowloon close to the harbor, it's really ...


3

Only possibly on the 23rd, most likely not even then. First of all, shops and malls are usually open on Public Holidays in Asia. Second of all, there are some public holidays during the 20-28th December, but they will not affect tourists. Malls and Shops will be open, except maybe for a couple of privately run restaurants or shops. However, since Macau ...


3

This is what I ended up doing: I took the 3am ferry from Macau to Hong Kong Island. Outside the ferry terminal I caught the N11 bus directly to the airport. It took about one hour and cost 31 HK$ (4 USD). It runs every 30 minutes, I took the 4:20am one. I was a bit concerned that 20 minutes may not be enough time to get from the ferry through ...


3

There is no limit on buying duty free items, but there are limits on how much you can bring in duty free when you come home to the UK. As far as Hong Kong is concerned you can buy as much as you please. The limits on importing items into the UK will be per person, so you and your girlfriend each get an allotted amount and if you exceed that amount then ...


3

The quick answer is "Yes, but you'll need to do different things depending where you're from". Hong Kong has different entry/visa requirements from China, in general it's much easier to get into Hong Kong. You can see the different country requirements on this page. So the chances are you will be able to get into Hong Kong. Then you can get the train, ...


3

All you need is the HK SAR passport. The page is worded that way because they can't say "nationals of Hong Kong": Hong Kong is a part of China, so there are no citizens of Hong Kong, only Chinese citizens of Hong Kong. And they also can't say "nationals of China", because that would give visa-free access to everybody in China. So they say "permanent ...



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