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11

These are platform numbers. The colour indicates the line but the number is specific to the station. (Online confirmation) You can note the platform numbers (I think trains of different lines always leave from different platforms in Hong Kong, ), but they vary from station to station.


10

Evidence of adequate funds is usually: A bank account statement for the last few months (usually 3 months) showing a good amount of money to cover your stay. Another evidence in case of business trips would be a letter from your employer stating that the employer is covering the trip expenses. A job certificate showing your income can also work, I have ...


9

A ferry is the only “normal” way to travel between Hong Kong and Macau (I think you can take a helicopter if you really want to spend a lot of money). There are multiple ferry links connecting different parts of Macau with different parts of Hong Kong. Given that you don't have all day, you should take the ferry straight from the Hong Kong airport when you ...


9

To add to Josh B's answer - Wan Chai Computer Centre. Wan Chai MTR Station, Exit A4 on to the pedestrian bridge, there will be escalators when you hit the main road to let you get down to street level. It is right next to a McDonalds (you can see that sign from the bridge). Less busy than the rest, good range. Mong Kok Computer Centre. Mong Kok MTR Station ...


8

While I never tried to bring alcohol to Australia from Hong Kong personally, there are plenty of reports saying it's not possible. I have never seen the required duty-free sealed packages in Hong Kong on the airport. Both this report from 2012 and this one here from last year say that it's impossible. Also this here from August this year confirms that. I ...


7

You can do so at the MTR service counters, but you will get the money back immediately only if there is less than 500 HKD on the card and the card is not damaged. There are several such service counters at the airport: At the airport, the Customer Service Centres can be found in the "buffer halls", after baggage reclaim and before entering the arrival ...


7

When you arrive with the airport express you will be in an underground station 2 floors below the IFC Mall. There will be two exits: The one on the same level to a taxi station. The other one will be an escalator leading up to the airport express check-in on ground level. Go up the escalator 2 floors. There will be the check-in counter on one side of the ...


6

There is no such regulation. Visa consultancies in Hong Kong do not list such a change in the list of changes that will take effect on 1st of September. There are changes regarding extensions in Shanghai that will be bound to a proof that you have enough money for each day you want to extend the visa, but this does not touch the initial visa duration. ...


5

I would suggest a thin jacket to protect you from cold wind and a thin sweater that you can put over whatever you are wearing. Both together should protect you enough. The temperature might drop end of December/January some more so the later you come the colder it gets, sometimes down to 8 degrees. Right now it's 25 for example. What I have to tell you ...


5

I've done this. There are clear signs at the station, as soon as you get off the train, directing you towards the shuttle buses. Just look for and follow the signs.


5

My reading of that -- and I'm obviously not a Chinese immigration bureaucrat -- is that she's probably OK without the visa, as long as you can make the trip out to be Malaysia->China->Malaysia via Hong Kong on both legs. From Malaysia to Hong Kong, as long as she claims to be going to Shenzhen or wherever, she is "in transit through Hong Kong" and "will go ...


5

I don't see why there should be an issue. You are a Singaporean national and being a Malaysian Resident should not be an issue at all. Singaporean nationals are allowed to travel visa free to Hong Kong for up to 90 days, which I believe is lesser than your intended period of stay. From there, you are free to board a flight to Los Angeles (United States) ...


4

Yes, they are interchange recommendations. The easiest and most important rule is that if the line doesn't go into the circle, it doesn't stop there (for example the Airport Express in Sunny Bay). The parenthesis-shaped symbol in Yau Tong conveys that there is a same-platform interchange between Tseung Kwan O (purple) eastbound and Kwun Tong (green) ...


4

Yes, you do need a visa. While almost everybody can transit through HKIA visa-free, Pakistani passport holders belong to the "^" group where: All nationals (except holders of Diplomatic and Official passports) are required to hold a valid visa for the HKSAR for whatever purpose (including those who are in transit and remain on the airside). This ...


4

Where will you be...? If you are on Hong Kong island then Wan Chai Computer Center is great. On the Kowloon side there is Mong Gok Computer Center but I have never been there. Both will have power adapters. The Computer Centers can be intimidating to non-technical people but I always found the people in WCCC helpful and honest.


4

You could try using the prices from a HK supermarket as a rough guide. Park N Shop is a pretty big chain (http://www.parknshop.com/WebShop/index.do); the other major one is Wellcome (http://www.wellcome.com.hk/wd2shop/en/html/index.html). I can't remember what the situation is with taxes on alcohol in HK, but I think it'll be a pretty safe bet it'll be ...


4

I've only ever had to show this when reentering Mexico from a sidetrip to Central America, or when extending my tourist visa in Mexico. It's been a few years (six to eight) but at that time they always accepted a printout of my bank balance from my bank's online banking website, and even just having a credit card. There was no attempt to verify the printout ...


3

Others have explained what “evidence of adequate funds” is in general but for Hong Kong specifically, none of this seem to really matter in practice. Traveling on a European passport, got in by plane, went to Macao and back by ferry, my passport and those of other people traveling with me were stamped quickly every time without asking much or looking at any ...


3

I was in Hong Kong recently and there was nothing that appeared to be 'weekend only'. I didn't see any change in how crowded things were at weekends compared with weekdays. Hong Kong is always incredibly crowded. We did try to visit the Hong Kong Museum of History on a Tuesday and found that it was closed every Tuesday. (It is well worth it, by the way - ...


3

Since the Hong Kong MTR connects to the airport on the Express line, there's an MTR office at the airport, before you head to security check / departure. You can get your card refunded there.


3

All you need is the HK SAR passport. The page is worded that way because they can't say "nationals of Hong Kong": Hong Kong is a part of China, so there are no citizens of Hong Kong, only Chinese citizens of Hong Kong. And they also can't say "nationals of China", because that would give visa-free access to everybody in China. So they say "permanent ...


2

You might be able to pick one up at the airport or if you jump a train to the IFC mall it would be strange if you couldnt find one quickly inside there. I'm a Mac person so I usually visit the Apple store in the IFC mall (Hong Kong MTR). In fact sometimes when I need to buy a new laptop I actually look for stopover flights in hong kong when I can jump on ...


2

Forever Bright Trading is a reliable visa agent in HK who I have used in the past. They claim to be able to provide M visas with the following information, which doesn't sound too onerous: Document(s) required: Documents on the commercial activity issued by a trade partner in China, or trade fair invitation or other invitation letters issued by ...


2

Unless you want to be shared for a stop-over, you must limit yourself to 23:59 minutes. Most travel sites let you search for flights and sort by total duration. This will help you find the longest stop-over at the end of the list. What often happens with popular routes is that you will not be offered such a layover because there are enough shorter options. ...


2

According to TIMATIC (the Visa system the airline will likely use when you check-in) : Visa required, except for Holders of a PRC Travel Document (Lu Xing Zheng) containing an entry permit for Hong Kong (SAR China). Visa required, except for A max. stay of 7 days for: - holders of passports issued by China (People's Rep.), provided ...


2

As a Pakistani national, unfortunately, you need a valid Visa for Hong Kong even if you are only transiting and never leave the airside in Hong Kong airport. You will most likely get one however since it says on this page that: An application for an entry visa/permit to enter Hong Kong for a visit (leisure, social or business) or transit may be ...


2

As I just found out to my dismay at the airport, Australia-bound passengers are unable to buy, although there doesn't seem to be any liquids/security re-screening at the gate. The duty free cashiers told me I would have to buy on arrival. I have just looked up the price and it seems to be 30% higher at Melbourne airport duty free. Feel like I've been ...


2

Gilles did an excellent job of answering this. I just want to add a few things. A few years back my friend and I were staying in Macau and took the Turbo Jet to and from Hong Kong. It took about one hour and cost about $80 each way. We thought about taking a helicopter ride one way just for the experience but it was going to be $350 for a one way flight. The ...


2

The quick answer is "Yes, but you'll need to do different things depending where you're from". Hong Kong has different entry/visa requirements from China, in general it's much easier to get into Hong Kong. You can see the different country requirements on this page. So the chances are you will be able to get into Hong Kong. Then you can get the train, ...


2

No contest: baby sling. Wikivoyage has an article about travelling in Japan with children, and the bit about travelling in dense Japanese cities applies to Hong Kong as well: In a nutshell, leave your giant stroller at home, as they can be a nightmare to deal with. City sidewalks are busy, temple and shrine paths are nearly invariably gravel, trains ...



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