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22

Rent an apartment hotel (serviced apartment) or an Airbnb apartment instead. These always include kitchens and basic cooking utensils. Also, in Hong Kong you can trust product labeling: if commercial baby food says "no dairy" on it, it won't contain any dairy.


18

Tao Fong Shan would appear to be what you're after. It's a 500m hill, in Sha Tin, where the Tao Fong Shan Christian Centre is located. From the wiki: "A 12-metre-high cross, facing Sha Tin, is the hallmark of the Centre. The cross is a popular among visitors and is a place for outside gatherings and meetings." It includes a photo that seems to ...


14

Cook anything in hotel room with our pressure cooker and/or with our induction stove. Standard at pretty much every hotel around the world. Fire hazard. Don't allow their restaurant' kitchen for this 5 minute cooking thing. Standard at pretty much every restaurant around the world. Health, safety, fire etc. Are you familiar with a commercial gas ...


13

In addition to Mark Mayo's answer, the cross is located in the mountainside on Needle Hill. It takes 15-20 mins to walk from the Sha Tin Railway Station via the path through Pai Tau Tsuen. There is no direct public transport(note1) there and there are not many signs. The camp is not open to public but you can join their events. PS1: The characters 成了 on ...


12

It's going to be quite short, but should be doable. Whether it's sensible is another matter. Consider the following, though: your incoming flight may of course be late time to disembark (if you're in the last row of an A380, that could take a while) time to get to immigration checks (may be 2 minutes or 15 depending on your arrival gate, possibly more — ...


12

Here is how it is supposed work: in the station (Hong Kong or Kowloon) you go through a turnstile. The turnstile has an RF card reader which can read (and invalidate) the ticket. Typically you need to swipe the ticket over the reading area next to the turnstile but if you are lucky the reader may still see it if it's just in your hand. After it's read, the ...


9

Note: It's not a confusing title, because it's a question, so that means there has to be something to answer. Some background to what the Octopus is Octopus is a stored value card that was invented by an Australian company, but turned down by Australia for being too advanced, and subsequently sold to Hong Kong, where now "everyone has one." The idea is it ...


8

As a US citizen, you do not need a visa to visit Hong Kong SAR for a short visit of up to 90 days. You do, however, need a visa to visit mainland China. As you are visiting family, you may be able to apply for the Q2 family visit visa, which allows you to remain for up to 180 days. You will need to have at least a double entry visa, as when you visit HK, ...


7

The closest thing to the Walled City is an enormous recreation of the Walled City in a gaming arcade (!) in Kawasaki, an unprepossessing suburb of Tokyo. Here's a blog post with lots of pictures. Address ウェアハウス川崎 (Warehouse Kawasaki-ten), 川崎区日進町3−7, official site (Japanese only). More authentic if rather less exciting are a series of walled villages in ...


7

I don't think it will be an issue, especially because you are accompanying someone who is a family member. I have also been invited to attend funerals for people I am not actually related to, and it hasn't been a problem. In fact I was often made to feel very welcome. At these sorts of occasions I tend to wait for an invitation from someone before I join in ...


6

The easiest option is almost certainly the nearest supermarket, but if you're looking for something a little more tarted up and are willing to pay the corresponding premium, you could do worse than Regency Spices. They've got a 14-piece "Chinese Spices Starter Kit" (HKD 328, ~US$42) and will even ship it worldwide for an extra $9. Response to an e-mail ...


6

I crossed back in 2012 using the Shenzhen metro (I believe it was to Lo Wu/Luohu), then walking across the checkpoint, then taking the MTR train to downtown Hong Kong, just as user Gagravarr mentions in comments. It was super-fast, easy and cheap, no Chinese language knowledge required. I do recommend getting a 1st-class MTR ticket though - it's slightly ...


6

If you are unhappy with the time factor of getting into Hong Kong city, consider as an alternative: the Ngong Ping Cable Car to the Big Buddha. The bottom of the cable car is a five minute taxi ride from the airport (you'll need a blue taxi). The cable car ride is 25 minutes, and the Big Buddha statue at the top well worth seeing. Allow a bit longer for ...


6

According to the Hong Kong Immgration Department nationals of India are allowed to visit Hong Kong visa free for 14 days (see part II). Given that you will not be required to have a visa to transit either.


6

You can buy an Octopus at basically at all transport terminals. This includes all MTR stations (including the airport), major light rail stations, major bus and ferry terminals, etc. Look for the "Customer Service Centre", which is basically the manned ticket booth.


5

No, that does not appear to be the case anymore. The authoritative reference appears to be the Visit Visa / Entry Permit Requirements for the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, by the Immigration Department (last updated July 2015), and it makes it quite clear that there are three separate categories that countries fall into: Visa free for visit not ...


5

I have few things to add to jcaron's answer. Returning your octopus card will cost you money. I'd advice on buying same day return airport express ticket. Second, exchange for some Hong Kong dollars and ask the MTR staff to changes some coins for you, they're willing to to this in general. Third, you probably will hit peak hour traffic on your way, and you ...


5

for cheaper alternatives try a youth hostel: http://www.hostelworld.com/hostels/Hong-Kong/Hong-Kong But be sure to verify that it is a licensed Guest House. You're supposed to prepare your own food in most of these hostels, so it should be exactly what you want. Also, avoid Chungking Mansions at all costs which is reserved for adventurers.


4

Simple, you walk. The distance between the two terminals are only about 100m apart.


4

The answer is a little bit long, so i jump to the conclusion in the beginning. Louhu/Lo Wu Point is suggested to be used due to its location advantage, and Futian/Lok Ma Chau is also advised. If you are going to HK airport, travel by ship is also a good option. Chartered car are advised if you have enough budget/ travel with disabilities. Land transport: ...


4

HKD is pegged to USD. It's usually at a rate of HKD7.75 = USD1. It has been pegged for several decades now. So technically there shouldn't be a difference with regards to purchasing using USD or HKD. If there is, the difference is marginal (less than 0.01%). You will find more fluctuation between JPY and HKD (and USD) because JPY is not "permanently" pegged ...


4

What about the Fes Medina (Fes el-Bali) in Morocco? Dense, labyrinthine, mixed residential-commercial, and pedestrian-only, but larger and more sparsely populated than the Walled City. Most parts are safe to visit, at least during the day, but guidebooks I've read suggest hiring a local guide as it is quite easy to get lost.


4

Depending on how much preparation you need to do. My advice is to use the local 7-Eleven or Circle K convenience stores. The vast majority of them will come equipped with a boiling water tap and a microwave. You will also find that you will never be more than a few paces from the nearest convenience store. We don't like to walk in Hong Kong, because its ...


3

Apparently there are no direct ferries: http://www.tripadvisor.com/ShowTopic-g294217-i1496-k936500-Travel_by_ferry_from_Hong_Kong_to_Taiwan-Hong_Kong.html It would be unlikely to save any money: see http://www.rome2rio.com/s/Hong-Kong/Taipei. A mid week round trip ticket is around US $200 on Hongkong airlines or China Air. Maybe US $250 on Eva. Cathay ...


3

As an Indian national, you do not require a visa to visit Hong Kong as a tourist for up to 14 days. Changing planes is obviously no problem. Reference: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visa_policy_of_Hong_Kong


3

I just found this 深圳极速赛车场 https://goo.gl/maps/i8mMLst5Ekm It a bit far tho. But I was told a taxi ride from the border is about 100-200buk hkd? It seem they even have rental for 100cc Yamaha gokart (the fast kind). Will be going there and giving it a try sometime next month. edit: it is confirmed. they have both 80cc (90 china yan) and 100cc (200 china ...


3

Instead of passport of original country, Macao Permanent Resident can enter HK with Macao SAR Permanent Resident Identity Card and Visit Permit for Residents of Macao SAR to Hong Kong SAR for <30days. The Visit Permit is valid for 7 years and holder can visit the HK on multiple occasions. Applicant should make the application in person in the ...


3

The main ones I could think of are (can be applied to any foreign land): Never talk about politics & religion. Never talk bad about women / class / races. Never make negative comments on their culture, food, habits, norms. Never talk about the army or the police, spies and government. Btw, I have never been to China, although have traveled other few ...


3

If the items are for your personal use, especially if they are unboxed, and you will be departing the country with them, then it is very unlikely that you would attract any attention. The restrictions typically relate to goods and gifts that would be left in the Kingdom. I am a software developer based in HK and I travel 20+ times a year through BKK. I ...


3

There is no crime in taking the ticket. A ticket can often be useful as a receipt for business expenses purposes, especially if you didn't get a receipt when you bought it. I'm not sure how you managed to get to the train without going through a ticket barrier in Hong Kong though. In any case you paid for the journey and have a ticket to prove it.



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