Hot answers tagged

32

Enjoy a nice lunch at one of the restaurants. 3 hours at any international airport is not enough time to leave. 30-60 minutes to deal with immigration, same again on the return (security, be at gate 30 minutes before departure etc. etc.) leaves you with an hour. Given HKG's location you won't be going anywhere.


27

Walking directions for Google maps says yes, it's possible: https://goo.gl/maps/MVoPY 57 min, 4.6 km from Airport station to the center of Tung Chung. Now I haven't tried this myself, and walking directions remain officially in beta... but a random Street View sampling indicates that the suggested route does have pedestrian walkways of some kind, including ...


22

I LOVE taking photos in Hong Kong. I have taken many photos in mainland China and in Hong Kong and a few other Asian countries - HK has a special "flavour" of its own. The answers to your 3 questions are "many places" in each case :-) - but there are some specialist ones. You will find mixes of all sorts of things all over. The really and genuinely old is ...


22

As a foreigner residing in Hong Kong, I would actually advise you not to worry about the language since majority of the people speak English. You will not have any communication problems unless you visit a few remote areas or when you deal with Mainland Chinese tourists and a few locals who do not speak English (Some of them speak English too).


22

Rent an apartment hotel (serviced apartment) or an Airbnb apartment instead. These always include kitchens and basic cooking utensils. Also, in Hong Kong you can trust product labeling: if commercial baby food says "no dairy" on it, it won't contain any dairy.


21

On paper it's theoretically possible, in reality -- having flown into, out of and through HK a fair amount -- I doubt it will work unless you're extremely lucky. Assuming you want to get to your departure gate thirty minutes before take-off then you have 150 minutes of spare time. You might push that to getting to your gate twenty minutes before take off ...


18

元, traditional Chinese 圓, is the generic Chinese character for "unit of currency" and is used to refer to the local currency: RMB in China, HKD in Hong Kong, SGD in Singapore, etc. So odds are pretty high the signs you saw were actually for prices in HKD. While many Hong Kong shops do accept RMB, it's just a service for Chinese travelers and the exchange ...


18

Tao Fong Shan would appear to be what you're after. It's a 500m hill, in Sha Tin, where the Tao Fong Shan Christian Centre is located. From the wiki: "A 12-metre-high cross, facing Sha Tin, is the hallmark of the Centre. The cross is a popular among visitors and is a place for outside gatherings and meetings." It includes a photo that seems to ...


14

Here are some places. Hong Kong is sometimes tricky to shoot because things are in most cases too close up for the size they have. It's not easy shooting 40-floor high buildings when you are standing in front of them. I find my 15mm fish-eye very helpful at times. Mong Kok: VERY dense place, lots of small shops Causeway bay, specially around Sogo and Times ...


14

Hong Kong airport is on an island. There is nothing else on that islands except an exhibition center and related activities (ferry terminal, hotel, …). In order to go anywhere interesting, you need to cross to the neighboring island of Lantau, Tung Chung being the first neighborhood when going from the airport to anywhere overland. While I think there is a ...


14

I have stayed at the Sheraton HK hotel (back in 2007), the one in Nathan road (that's the English name of the road if I remember correctly). The toilet is no different than any western style toilet. The hotel itself and its facilities are pretty decent.


14

Cook anything in hotel room with our pressure cooker and/or with our induction stove. Standard at pretty much every hotel around the world. Fire hazard. Don't allow their restaurant' kitchen for this 5 minute cooking thing. Standard at pretty much every restaurant around the world. Health, safety, fire etc. Are you familiar with a commercial gas ...


13

Your visa will indicate how many times you are permitted to enter China under that visa. On the first line, there should be a field "ENTRIES" with a letter and a chinese character following it. If that letter is M, you are eligible for multiple entries. China also has single and double-entry visas; presumably, those would be the letters S and D respectively. ...


13

The TSA is insane. They require gate checks for liquids on US-bound flights. I've encountered the same nonsense at the gate on every flight from Shanghai since they put the rule in place. Of course, without an x-ray it's not very effective. Here's a link from Cathay Pacific confirming this requirement to flights to the U.S. from Hong Kong.


13

In addition to Mark Mayo's answer, the cross is located in the mountainside on Needle Hill. It takes 15-20 mins to walk from the Sha Tin Railway Station via the path through Pai Tau Tsuen. There is no direct public transport(note1) there and there are not many signs. The camp is not open to public but you can join their events. PS1: The characters 成了 on ...


12

I have not stayed at the Sheraton specifically but based on my experience with other Hong Kong hotels/venues, I am pretty sure you will find “Western” bathrooms there. But as far as (men's) toilet experience is concerned, in Hong Kong you must try The Peninsula, more specifically its bar (you can go there even if you can't afford the hotel).


12

It's going to be quite short, but should be doable. Whether it's sensible is another matter. Consider the following, though: your incoming flight may of course be late time to disembark (if you're in the last row of an A380, that could take a while) time to get to immigration checks (may be 2 minutes or 15 depending on your arrival gate, possibly more — ...


12

Here is how it is supposed work: in the station (Hong Kong or Kowloon) you go through a turnstile. The turnstile has an RF card reader which can read (and invalidate) the ticket. Typically you need to swipe the ticket over the reading area next to the turnstile but if you are lucky the reader may still see it if it's just in your hand. After it's read, the ...


11

This is a panoramic view of Hong Kong. Thanks to Google Images Search.


11

Obviously "best" is always subjective and depends on the particular person, but... Having done 1-day stopover trips in Hong Kong a few times over the past few years (including a 22 hour stopover there 2 weeks ago!), my vote would be for the area on one side or other of Victoria Harbour - either the Kowloon/Nathan road area on the north side, or Causeway Bay/...


11

Most retailers in Hong Kong do not accept RMB. The 7-11 stores* have an enlightend policy where they will accept RMB at HKD face value and give you any change in HKD. As HKD are worth less than RMB they make a profit of the exchange rate on the transaction. The current exchange rate is 1 RMB = 1.25114 HKD (April 2013), so the 7-11 stores are making an ...


11

I would worry less about the Shanghai-Beijing train being full than the Hong Kong-Shanghai train - unless you travel over Chinese new year or another holiday. There are trains in intervals of 10-40 minutes and should allow you to at least get on the next train in case the current one is full. There is a website that lets you check the availability of seats ...


11

Evidence of adequate funds is usually: A bank account statement for the last few months (usually 3 months) showing a good amount of money to cover your stay. Another evidence in case of business trips would be a letter from your employer stating that the employer is covering the trip expenses. A job certificate showing your income can also work, I have ...


11

These are platform numbers. The colour indicates the line but the number is specific to the station. (Online confirmation) You can note the platform numbers (I think trains of different lines always leave from different platforms in Hong Kong, ), but they vary from station to station.


11

A ferry is the only “normal” way to travel between Hong Kong and Macau (I think you can take a helicopter if you really want to spend a lot of money). There are multiple ferry links connecting different parts of Macau with different parts of Hong Kong. Given that you don't have all day, you should take the ferry straight from the Hong Kong airport when you ...


11

It depends on the hotel. Upscale ones, especially if they're western brands, will generally have western style (sit) toilets. Cheap hotels, especially if they're local or not a chain, will generally have eastern style (squat) toilets. It's easy to find your preferred style if you know where to look and can identify the clientele the hotel caters to. A large ...


11

I would suggest you taking the advices from Wikitravel. Nevertheless, most locals under the age of 40 (and many over that as well) know enough English for basic communication. To improve your chances of being understood, speak slowly, stick to basic words and sentences, and avoid using slang. You may also speak Mandarin, which is also widely understood ...


10

I drank bubble tea in Hong Kong practically every day when I was travelling there but never fell ill. (Love bubble tea!) The way bubble tea is packaged in machines that seals the drink in means it's usually sold in shops with fairly good standards of hygiene. Besides, while the drink itself is not hot, bubble tea is prepared using chilled tea - and the ...


10

You can do so at the MTR service counters, but you will get the money back immediately only if there is less than 500 HKD on the card and the card is not damaged. There are several such service counters at the airport: At the airport, the Customer Service Centres can be found in the "buffer halls", after baggage reclaim and before entering the arrival ...


10

I spent my semester abroad in Hong Kong (at HKUST) last year. Basically everybody speaks English, from taxi drivers to cashiers. Also road signs etc. are all in English as well. The students at HKUST did understand Mandarin, but were quite reluctant to speak with you in Mandarin, they definitely prefer English.



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