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18

I LOVE taking photos in Hong Kong. I have taken many photos in mainland China and in Hong Kong and a few other Asian countries - HK has a special "flavour" of its own. The answers to your 3 questions are "many places" in each case :-) - but there are some specialist ones. You will find mixes of all sorts of things all over. The really and genuinely old is ...


14

元, traditional Chinese 圓, is the generic Chinese character for "unit of currency" and is used to refer to the local currency: RMB in China, HKD in Hong Kong, SGD in Singapore, etc. So odds are pretty high the signs you saw were actually for prices in HKD. While many Hong Kong shops do accept RMB, it's just a service for Chinese travelers and the exchange ...


12

Here are some places. Hong Kong is sometimes tricky to shoot because things are in most cases too close up for the size they have. It's not easy shooting 40-floor high buildings when you are standing in front of them. I find my 15mm fish-eye very helpful at times. Mong Kok: VERY dense place, lots of small shops Causeway bay, specially around Sogo and Times ...


11

This is a panoramic view of Hong Kong. Thanks to Google Images Search.


11

Obviously "best" is always subjective and depends on the particular person, but... Having done 1-day stopover trips in Hong Kong a few times over the past few years (including a 22 hour stopover there 2 weeks ago!), my vote would be for the area on one side or other of Victoria Harbour - either the Kowloon/Nathan road area on the north side, or Causeway ...


11

These are platform numbers. The colour indicates the line but the number is specific to the station. (Online confirmation) You can note the platform numbers (I think trains of different lines always leave from different platforms in Hong Kong, ), but they vary from station to station.


10

Your visa will indicate how many times you are permitted to enter China under that visa. On the first line, there should be a field "ENTRIES" with a letter and a chinese character following it. If that letter is M, you are eligible for multiple entries. China also has single and double-entry visas; presumably, those would be the letters S and D respectively. ...


10

Evidence of adequate funds is usually: A bank account statement for the last few months (usually 3 months) showing a good amount of money to cover your stay. Another evidence in case of business trips would be a letter from your employer stating that the employer is covering the trip expenses. A job certificate showing your income can also work, I have ...


9

Looking around online (ask.com, Yahoo Answers), the conclusion seems to be that you can spend RMB only in certain bigger shops that advertise this with the Yuán sticker on their window or the cash register. For other smaller shops, street vendors or taxis you can not use RMB. As usual the exchange rate you get is not as good as through a bank, currency ...


9

I would worry less about the Shanghai-Beijing train being full than the Hong Kong-Shanghai train - unless you travel over Chinese new year or another holiday. There are trains in intervals of 10-40 minutes and should allow you to at least get on the next train in case the current one is full. There is a website that lets you check the availability of seats ...


9

To add to Josh B's answer - Wan Chai Computer Centre. Wan Chai MTR Station, Exit A4 on to the pedestrian bridge, there will be escalators when you hit the main road to let you get down to street level. It is right next to a McDonalds (you can see that sign from the bridge). Less busy than the rest, good range. Mong Kok Computer Centre. Mong Kok MTR Station ...


9

A ferry is the only “normal” way to travel between Hong Kong and Macau (I think you can take a helicopter if you really want to spend a lot of money). There are multiple ferry links connecting different parts of Macau with different parts of Hong Kong. Given that you don't have all day, you should take the ferry straight from the Hong Kong airport when you ...


8

I drank bubble tea in Hong Kong practically every day when I was travelling there but never fell ill. (Love bubble tea!) The way bubble tea is packaged in machines that seals the drink in means it's usually sold in shops with fairly good standards of hygiene. Besides, while the drink itself is not hot, bubble tea is prepared using chilled tea - and the ...


8

Most retailers in Hong Kong do not accept RMB. The 7-11 stores* have an enlightend policy where they will accept RMB at HKD face value and give you any change in HKD. As HKD are worth less than RMB they make a profit of the exchange rate on the transaction. The current exchange rate is 1 RMB = 1.25114 HKD (April 2013), so the 7-11 stores are making an ...


8

While I never tried to bring alcohol to Australia from Hong Kong personally, there are plenty of reports saying it's not possible. I have never seen the required duty-free sealed packages in Hong Kong on the airport. Both this report from 2012 and this one here from last year say that it's impossible. Also this here from August this year confirms that. I ...


7

No you cannot reliably use Renminbi/Yuan in Hong Kong, you will have to exchange it. Taxis generally do not accept them. Other shops generally do not display if they accept RMB or not, and if they accept it, you will most likely get change back in HKD. You can either exchange at a bank or at one of the hundreds of money changers in Hong Kong. To my ...


7

While sites like Wikitravel don't seem to help too much in this case, fortunately we can look at anecdotal evidence and quotes on VirtualTourist pages like these. Quotes from these pages for a selection of clubs: "Dress Code: No jeans or sneakers/trainers, must be very fashionable." "Dress Code: No Jeans , shorts, or flip flops !!!!" "Dress ...


7

You can store baggage at Hong Kong International Airport itself. There's a baggage storage facility at Level 3, Terminal 2. At 10 HKD / hour, it's quite inexpensive too! Here's something you should consider though: peak time traffic is bad in Hong Kong and if you plan to reach your host's house after 5pm, it might take you 1-2 hours by taxi to reach your ...


7

The information you have is consistent with that given by the Hong Kong immigration authorities in that US passport holders may visit Hong Kong for leisure purposes for up to 90 days without a visa. (Note that the US State Department website which you quote says that you only need a passport valid for at least one month after the planned travel dates. The ...


7

As #naeblis posted, there is no generic answer to this question. My answer would be that it depends on the type of trip you are planning. If you have inflexible dates or a set itinerary I'd recommend getting the tickets as soon as you know these details. Also, if your itinerary involves low-traffic routes or minor destinations with infrequent flights I'd ...


7

This rather more than a "shopping answer", hopefully. How to determine if Jade is genuine: This webpage provides an excellent discussion of types of genuine jade and of non genuine alternatives. This page is also very useful Excellent characteristics table for Jade and other materials. A pocket spectrometer is possibly a really good tool. These are ...


7

If you are talking about the paper card that you filled out when you landed, then no. There is no need to return this. You can throw it away. There will be no issue on the next trip to Hong Kong.


7

When you arrive with the airport express you will be in an underground station 2 floors below the IFC Mall. There will be two exits: The one on the same level to a taxi station. The other one will be an escalator leading up to the airport express check-in on ground level. Go up the escalator 2 floors. There will be the check-in counter on one side of the ...


7

You can do so at the MTR service counters, but you will get the money back immediately only if there is less than 500 HKD on the card and the card is not damaged. There are several such service counters at the airport: At the airport, the Customer Service Centres can be found in the "buffer halls", after baggage reclaim and before entering the arrival ...


6

There is no way for anyone to know in advance if prices will go up or down in the coming month. In general prices go up as you get closer to the departure date, as the lower fare buckets sell out. Airlines of course have sales and promotions, but it is not in their best interest to promote the upcoming sale before it begins. Consider - if they did that, ...


6

Hong Kong SAR has fairly relaxed rules for visa-free entry ranging from 14 to 90 days to a large range of nationalities. The official rules to list you are supposed to prove you have sufficient funds to cover your travel and evidence of onwards travel. However, in practice I have rarely found HK Border Control officials asking anyone to show this evidence or ...


6

There isn't a free public shuttle bus service to/from the airport. (There are, of course, normal paid public buses that serve HKIA.) What I think your relative may have gotten it confused with is complimentary hotel bus services that are reserved for guests. I'd recommend taking the HKIA Express though. It's a lot cheaper ($100) than getting a taxi and a ...


6

Looks like the restricted area is restricted for the passengers only, so you will be in this area basically. The non-restricted are is where anyone can come from the city, and which is before border control and security checks (from the perspective of people arriving from the city). You can assume that you will not get to this area (unless you want to go ...


6

There is no such regulation. Visa consultancies in Hong Kong do not list such a change in the list of changes that will take effect on 1st of September. There are changes regarding extensions in Shanghai that will be bound to a proof that you have enough money for each day you want to extend the visa, but this does not touch the initial visa duration. ...


5

From the Wikitravel piece on Hong Kong and eating exotic meats, it sounds like there are a few restaurants that sell it and it's likely legal. They even name restaurants that sell it: While Hong Kong has long banned dog and cat meat and has strict rules on importing many meats of wild life animals, snake meat is commonly seen in winter in different ...



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