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17

You can say. ผมไม่อยากไปที่ท่ารถ. ผมอยากไป ..(fill in your destination).. ช่วยพาไปหน่อยได้มั๊ยครับ. ผมเป็นนักเดินทาง. ขอบคุณครับ. It means: I don't want to go to the bus station. I want to go to ..., please can you take me there. I'm a traveller. Thank you. Here's how you'd say it: Pom mai yak pai tee ta rod. Pom yak pai tee ..(fill in your ...


16

If possible, try to hitchhike with someone else - it's slightly harder as two to get a lift, but much safer. Text someone with your route when you get a lift, as a back-up safety so that someone knows where you are. Include the make and model and license plate of the car. I've heard people suggest carrying a knife, but to me that feels like it might end up ...


16

things I do occasionally with my towel while traveling: fold it to a pillow at night, or cover any (stained) pillows i encounter in cheap hostels/motels place wet clothes on one half, then wrap the other half over it and sleep on it, and the clothes should be dry next morning as a beach towel group loose or dirty/wet items together in your backpack fold it ...


15

Hitchwiki has: Hitchhiking is done in Iran by waving one's arm at an oncoming car, or by dribbling one of your hands. I have not seen this myself (experience only of Tehran) because taxis seemed virtually free there anyway but I think I recognise the "dribbling hand" gesture as something that looks to me like an accelerated version of a 'slow down' ...


11

As best as I can google, there are a few options out there. Hitchwiki appears to be the most mentioned. There is also RoadJunky for other resources.


11

Your best bet is to sign up to a crew-finding website like findacrew.net. A friend who cycled from London to New Zealand did this for the ocean parts - hung out in port and used the site. What was observed is that there are different levels of opportunities. Some berths require that you have licenses or sailing experience, or a particular skill (eg ...


11

I've actually hitchhiked tens of thousands of miles across North America, and while I haven't done any in the past few years (so things may have changed a little) I think it's certainly possible to do this in under two weeks. I've gone from Massachusetts to California in six days, for instance. What I don't have is any experience hitchhiking as a woman, so ...


10

Simple answer: YES. Not necessarily in that there are signs, but certainly there are many hitching-friendly countries. Some people on this site would claim you can hitch in any country. Hitchwiki is a great site for checking out the 'hitchability' of a country. It has a list of all countries and their ratings for your quick reference guide. So for ...


10

Towel? Air dry, if needed. As for sleeping, I always went with the long johns, ski mask, coat and gloves approach. You can shed those items during the day and take up half the space as a bulky, "look at me I'm obviously a vagrant" sleeping bag. But yes @Ginamin, towels make amazing pillows.


10

I once forgot a towel while backpacking. I was on a minimalist trip, so I didn't want to buy one and as I was traveling with only a schoolbag sized pack, I had very limited absorptive items (only 2 shirts, one pair of hiking cargos, one pair of board shorts total). So, every morning, I would shower, then use the shirt I wore the previous day as a towel, then ...


10

The short answer is yes. I've hosted probably 20+ people who got to my location via hitchhiking, and most of them had hitchhiked all the way across Europe and couchsurfed most of the way. The only method is messaging people individually, yes, but I don't see why that's a problem. Simply state that you're hitchhiking and will be there on sometime between x ...


10

This totally depends on the country, each country has different rules. Wikipedia has a page dedicated to Knife legislation. Check the countries you will visit before brining your knife with you. Same thing goes for pepper spray, it is different from one country to another, again Wikipedia has a page dedicated to pepper spray. Stun guns are a bad choice as ...


9

I've been hitchhiking all over the world for the past year and a half, currently in Europe. But we're not supposed to do broad or list questions on Stack Exchange. So rather than list out all kinds of stuff I can think of I can make it one right answer by pointing to what might be considered the current best online resource: The Hitchwiki page on ...


9

There is a similar exchange for hitch-hikers in Norway called haikeren.no. I haven't used it, but I would find it strange if you find any offers for a ride on an odd route like Kiruna-Tromsø on a specific date. You can of course place your own ad to tell that you are looking for a ride, but I don't think the site is well known and much in use. Even if you ...


9

I've hitchhiked a few quite different parts of the globe (Australia, Caucasus, East Asia, Eastern Europe, Southeast Asia, Turkey, Western Europe) so I think I've learned some tips and tricks. Many more people will stop if there's at least one female in your group. More people will stop for young people. The smaller your group is the more vehicles have ...


9

Is it safe? Safe is a broad word, and nobody can be absolutely certain about safety. You'd consider driving or taking a plane 'safe', presumably, but crashes happen sometimes too. It's relative. So now that we establish that, we can look at hitchhiking. Is it safe? Depends on who sees you, who picks you up, and how you react. We actually have a post on ...


8

Well the obvious answer is to hitch - that'll lower your transport costs massively ;) It all depends on whether you're up to trying that. I don't tend to, personally, but on the occasion I have, it's pretty fun. One thing to note about the public transport on Sicily is that it's nearly a 6 day service - the transport options are massively reduced on ...


8

For private charters, the industry term for what you are describing is "empty leg". A quick internet search will bring up a number of sites that list empty legs. The NY Times had an article about this recently: http://travel.nytimes.com/2011/09/25/travel/fly-a-private-jet-at-public-prices.html


8

You can't hitchhike to the Galalpagos. If you are trying to do things on the cheap your best bet is to turn up to Guayaquil in Ecuador. From here they have boats cruises that depart on tours around the Galapagos. If you have time on your hands you can hang around and wait for a boat tour where they haven't sold all of the spaces. Depending on demand, you ...


7

A couple of months ago i crossed the Albanian-Greek border not at Konispol/Sagiada, but another one. It worked out fine, so i guess there shouldn't be a problem for other border crossings from Albania to Greece.


7

Those spots are called 'Liftershalte' in Dutch, Wikipedia has a list: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liftershalte Don't expect too much there are only 6 of those, it's a bit of a gimmick more then anything else.


7

The area next to Hong Kong-China Boundary in Hong Kong is Frontier Closed Area. Only permitted people can access it. If you want to cross the boundary, the cheapest way is Huangbus (皇巴士) from Huanggang Port to San Tin Public Transport Interchange. It costs $9 HKD, paid by cash or Octopus card. Dont expect to hitchhike in GuangDong. Each year many drivers ...


6

My hostel owner here in Albania assures me I can walk across. Last night I walked across the southernmost border crossing from Albania to Greece on the Konispol-Sagiada route with absolutely no problems at 8pm Albanian time, 9pm Greek time.


6

I used TomTom Route planner to check this out. And it confirms that SH4 is their suggested route, so I'd suspect it's totally fine to travel on.


6

One thing to add to Kizzle's answer is that Tourism to the Galapagos is highly regulated. The number of visitors is limited and all tours visiting the area are counted, registered etc, since 98% of the land is national park. You cannot visit those areas by yourself, you need a certified guide. So even if you own a boat, you cannot just travel around and ...


6

The answer is both yes and no. Outside Bangkok, Thailand has only two roads that are "real" controlled-access, grade-separated motorways: Route 7 from Bangkok to Pattaya (150km), which has (AFAIK) Thailand's solitary "real" rest area as well, and Route 5, which loops around Bangkok's periphery and which you're unlikely to venture onto. So, no, you're not ...


6

These are some of the techniques. Some of them look obvious when you read them but it cost me a few hours waiting to learn. These only reflects my experience as an ocasional hitchhiker and may not perform well in every situation. Avoid curves (drivers don't like to stop near curves - it's dangerous to stop due to low visibility). The curve can also be ...


6

Lets get realistic, even if you do whatever other people may say, humans need food and a place to sleep, so absolute free travel is impossible, unless you walk(using your own energy), beg (ask for a lift) or steal (travel without ticket in a train and pretend to have no money to any ticket checking staff, which is highly highly discouraged). Having said, ...


6

I have hitchhiked all over Europe, including boats and empty leg flights, on multiple trips. My own experience is generally positive and I see staying in cheap hotels as a far greater danger than hitchhiking. It can be dangerous sleeping in an unlit or unattended rest area. And depending upon your definition of 'danger', standing upon the Autobahn or any ...



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