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7

I'm very familiar with the European alps, but not at all familiar with the sacred mountains in China. So I can only address why stairs are rare in the alps: You mentioned hiking up the sacred mountains. The peak isn't that important in the Alps, so paths rarely take the shortest route to the peak. Instead you have a whole network of paths that link various ...


1

In the end I chose to buy a pair of the lesser known Hanwag Togiak GTX shoes. They seem much lighter and more breathable than the other shoes I've seen, while they are still in the B category. Other shoes I considered are Jack Wolfskin Impulse Texapore O2+Id, Lowa Phoenix GTX Mid and the Hanwag Comox GTX, all of which are in the B category. I found that ...


0

According to physics, Work = Force X Distance. Therefore, the same amount of work is done to ascend a mountain by stair or by inclined path. What you will find is that with a stair, the distance is shorter and the work is greater; and with a path, the distance is greater, but the force is less. And if you consider the same speed (distance/time), it will ...


2

I would say just based on the photos (and I realize they are just examples) that whether or not you build stairs or switchbacks would depend entirely on the landscape, the composition of the mountain, and surrounding vegetation. If I were to try to plan a path to the top of the mountain, I would look at what I had to work with. If I had the real estate to ...


-1

Money. The average wage in central Europe is five times that of rural China. Which does not mean that the alpine states do not invest quite a lot into maintaining hiking paths. In Europe it's just more efficient to use methods which are less labor-intense and more machine-intense. When you build stairs up a mountain terrain, you need to invest quite a ...


6

I have another possible explanation that I cannot corraborate with online sources at this time. I visited Japan several years ago, and as one does (and should definitely do), I visited many Buddhist temples and Shinto shrines while there. I believe it was a Buddhist temple (as opposed to a shrine) where I first noticed two sets of stairs. There was a ...


0

I've only been to the Great Wall in Beijing, which is a huge segment of the wall. It would be fantastic if the Great Wall were just a single, fully connected really long and thin park. Unfortunately, this is not the case. There are instead a bunch (dozens?) of segments that are beautifully reconstructed, like in your picture. These are run as tourist ...


-1

Based on pure speculation, I would think it is much less overall work to cut stairs into a suitable mountain, rather than create a terraced road using switchbacks. I mean, imagine you, alone, are responsible for creating a path to the top and you only have a hammer and chisel...


8

European point of view: Back in the times (or what I was told many years ago by some locals) is that they would let a donkey lead the group to find the path of least resistance. The natural instincts of the animal would find the best path for climbing (wonder what IQ is required ... as opposed to humans :) Considering they used the mules and such for loads/...


31

To add to the other answers, some paths my be susceptible to soil erosion - from foot traffic and rainfall. This eventually makes some sections almost impassable for some people, as well as damaging the terrain and surrounding vegetation. I have seen this first hand in Hong Kong. For example: So in many places, steps are built. In HK these were ...


46

Stairs are easier to walk than rocky paths. In ancient times they allowed royalty more leisurely access to sacred mountains symbolizing their high rank in society, while commoners were likely restricted to walking older foot paths (if they were even allowed on top). Today all 'pilgrims' are afforded the ease of stairs. In Europe a lot of mountain top ...


13

When many people climb the same path every day, natural rocks become smooth, slippery and dangerous. An example in Europe is the path to Château de Montségur in the french Pyrenees. Stairs are less prone to such wear over time.


2

I am the founder of the website CitySafe which aims to assess the crime and safety levels of large cities and countries worldwide (it’s still work-in-progress, but so far I have done c. 40 cities and countries). For my answer, I am referring to the page about [safety in Rio de Janeiro] (including a crime map).(FYI, Citysafe’s rating algorithm has assessed a ...


4

I describe my own experience as I went on the Camino de Santiago in summer 2011. I will focus on Spain and the camino frances, if you want to know something about france, switzerland or germany I will be more than happy to add my experience in these countries. To answer your question: yes it is absolutly realistic. But maybe you need some time. I met ...


10

3 months seems like it would be on the tight side, especially if you're not an endurance athlete capable of sustaining a particularly fast pace every single day. The Pacific Crest Trail Association recommends allowing at least five months for the entire trail, and you're doing a substantial portion of it. The time will depend a lot on weather and other ...


16

This will most depend on your own pace, so this is hard to predict. However, on Wikipedia we can find that the PCT association recommends 6 to 8 months for the entire trail. Starting near San Francisco (at Lake Tahoe, still hundreds of kilometres from San Francisco?), you seem to be able to start near the California Section K, which starts at mile 1092, out ...


2

From Wikivoyage on Badaling: The hike is a challenge with plenty of steep hills, so once you get a bit into the wall the crowd thins quickly. It takes ~2-3h to hike the whole wall depending on your fitness/weather/crowd.


4

I'm chinese, and I went to the Great Wall last year. I believe you can go to the top. But people mountain, people sea. Also, if you do not know the specific way to the great wall, you will pay at least 150 CNY from the last metro or bus station. But it seems there is a train which is fast and cheap and convenient to the great wall directly. The first time, ...


8

The short answer is that paths are rarely marked well, and it is generally necessary to have a map and to know how to read it. Scotland has a long-established right to roam, meaning you can walk anywhere as long as you avoid cultivated land, gardens, and area immediately around buildings. That's great for hikers, but the flip side is that there are few ...


8

Your planned itinerary is too ambitious. You might make it, but might is not enough. Considering the uncertainty of hiking off-trail in unknown terrain, you need to have a plan that allows shortening/escaping if your route fails. I did my first trek in Iceland last year, in Lónsöræfi. I have previous hiking experience in the Alps, Swedish Lapland (Sarek, ...


10

You can walk the entire Ming Dynasty Great Wall it's only 6000 kilometers give or take a few and doesn't even take two years: On Dec 2, 601 days after departing from the Wall's westernmost terminus, Gansu province's Jiayuguan, the 42-year-old stomped over the final brick of the final eastern watchtower, Liaoning province's Hushan.


4

First, your numbers are off. Denver is officially 5280 feet (1609m) above sea level, which is the source of its nickname as the "Mile-High City". In most cases this won't be a problem. More specific answers depend on details like Your personal physical ability to adapt. Some adapt more quickly than others, and this doesn't necessarily correlate with ...



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