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37

There is some confusion, top commercial speed for TGV is 320 km/hr between Paris and Lorraine (on the way to Metz, Nancy, Strasbourg, Luxembourg, or Germany). Some conventional high-speed trains run or ran at 350 in Spain and China, 400-430 with Maglev technology, but not at 500 and more. Some parts of the French high-speed network were also designed to ...


21

On the way to France, the Eurostar ski train (both day and night) has three (official) stops, Moûtiers, Aime-la-Plagne and Bourg-St-Maurice. On the return, it has only two stops, Moûtiers and Bourg-St-Maurice. At both of these stations, there is a special platform that can be fenced off from the rest of the French rail network. There is also a special ...


21

The Romancecar services by the Odakyu Railway in Japan... The line connects Shinjuku in Tokyo with various tourist areas towards Mt. Fuji to the southwest. The trains with passengers seats at the front of the train (only the type 7000 and 50000 trains are currently in operation) are primary used on train services to Hakone. The schedule identifies which ...


15

As an addendum to Relaxed's excellent answer, there's only one place on the planet right now where the public can experience traveling at 500+ km/h on a train, and that's JR Central's Yamanashi maglev test track in Japan. However, test runs open to the public are scheduled only irregularly, and are extremely popular. The last runs for 2,400 lucky winners ...


12

Both the XPT and the Tilt Train can go faster than 160 km/h, and have done so for short distances in trial runs. Full list here. However, in operation both are capped at a maximum of 160 km/h, and typically average out much slower (the Sydney-Melbourne XPT barely beats 80 km/h for the trip). As for why specifically 160 km/h, it's a typical cut off ...


10

This one definitely does not tick all the boxes, but as asked by the OP, here comes an historic example: The SNCF X3800 "Picasso" (more details in french) was used from 1950 to 1988 in France. However, it definitely does not qualify for "high-speed" (top speed 120 km/h). It is still in use on a few heritage railway lines (see french Wikipedia page linked ...


10

Yes, there is a similar regulation (EC) No 1371/2007 on rail passengers’ rights and obligations. Its application is mandatory for international trains operating within the EU. Member states may excempt domestic long distance traffic during a transition period. The regulation does not apply for domestic, regional traffic. Summarized, it gives the passengers ...


9

In such situations, it is possible (and recommended) to contact the Eurostar personnel during the voyage to have them stamp and sign your ticket to use it as proof. They even announce it ("our personnel will be passing soon, in case you have any questions..."). Then, if you do miss your train due to this delay, you can show the stamped ticket to the rail ...


8

I can verify that the N700a trains have power sockets for the seats at the ends of the cars. Look at the bottom of the side wall under the window near your feet. Plugged in right now, actually :-)


7

If you are taking the direct train (daily during the Summer and other high-demand times, five times weekly the rest of the year) from Marne-la-Vallée-Chessy to London St. Pancras, then French Immigration Exit and UK Immigration entry are performed in Marne-la-Vallée-Chessy station - to be precise, in the upper concourse of that station. Because the station ...


5

For some delays, the Eurostar Live Service Information page will list the delay for the service, and estimated revised arrival times. However, that doesn't always get updated as often as you might like... For Eurostars still in the UK, it's possible to stalk them with quite some accuracy on RealTimeTrains.co.uk. If you search for departures from St Pancras ...


5

You can look on the Twitter feed Eurostar Delays, which is feeding announcements from staff and passengers alike. Here's a snapshot... The 'generic' Twitter feed for Eurostar has some info, but it refers more to press and media reports rather than real-time info... And for additional information, the Eurostar's site for Disruption Compensation has ...


5

Does not tick the first point, but here goes... ICE T, ICE 3 and ICE 3M from Germany (ICE T, Germany, Wikimedia) (View from behind the driver in an ICE T, Germany, Wikimedia) Is the driver cab sitting on top of the first carriage, or fully automated? Neither. The driver sits in front, with a transparent partition. The driver has a switch to make the ...


4

This is an incomplete answer as unfortunately I have no experience about the BeiJing - TianJin connection. In general your considerations seem sensible to me, here are some remarks though: Chinese trains can get full and fully booked for days around the major holiday weeks. May 1st is a holiday so there might be increased travel the day after but it is ...


4

Last news says it should be ready for passengers in the first half of 2017 (last paragraph): http://www.laopiniondemalaga.es/malaga/2016/05/03/ave-granada-afronta-fase-final/846839.html. The last comment you got is right, one half is Granada-Antequera and the other Antequera-Sevilla... not sure how that will play out though.


4

That project was meant to be finished on 2014, delayed to 2015 and finally to 2016. It's uncertainly until now if it's going to be finished on this half of semester as they promise to (again). This is the last new I could find, and It says that they will open up the station without even finishing the rails (sigh). Probably it's going to take more time as ...


3

From one of my professor, in a French transportation engineering school, the main reason for TGV in France "only" going at 320 km/h are security and comfort standards. In fact, for security, the main reason is that TGV are attended to be able to stop within, if i'm not mistaken, like 3350 meters or so (order value). driving at more than 500km/h means so ...


3

For online resources, this Japanese page has a list. The train names might survive Google or other machine-translations.


3

The E5 and E6 series used in northern Japan (Tohoku Shinkansen; Komachi, Hayabusa, some Hayate) have a pair of 100V outlets for the front row of each car, and a single outlet beneath the window on the other rows on each side. Note that since the seats rotate, there are also two outlets behind the back row of each car, although they would be inconvenient to ...


2

Does Australia have any trains that can go faster than 160 km/h? Yes. The top speed of the Melbourne-Sydney XPT is 190km/h. The Queensland tilt train can do 210km/h.


2

There are various compensation rules for long-distance trains, both cross-border and national. Edit: The compensation rules for Deutsche Bahn can be found here. They explain compensation for delays of more than one or two hours, follow-up transportation in case of missed connections, and reimbursements for overnight accommodations. The page also has some ...


2

Sitting on a Kodama now and can't find any unfortunately, for future reference.


1

As Volodymyr mentioned, the train is called Sapsan, Russian for peregrine falcon. It is a Siemens-built high-speed train based on the ICE 3 running in Germany and Siemens calls it Velaro RUS. Formerly, they not only served Moscow–Saint Petersburg but also Moscow–Nizhnyi Novgorod, but they were phased out of the latter in favour of Talgo trains in 2015. You ...



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