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I get severely airsick so some of my tips would be (plus...im a child) ♥ Make sure you have a plastic bag with you. ♥ Ask the crew ♥sit near the aisle(so you can get to the toilet)or wing (it helps balance) ♥Notify the people near you ♥bring spare clothes in your carry on bag ♥bring tissues Hope this helps.


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In addition to all the previous answer, I am often shocked to realize how many people don't understand how to use a fan. I heard many people saying it is useless if it blows warm air. That is, of course, 100% wrong. As mentioned is previous answers, sweat evaporation is the key for surviving. Sweat evaporate easily on naked skin in dry warm air. It does not ...


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I agree with all the other answerers about clothing and water. A simple way to cool down is to wear wet clothing. So, you bring extra water with you and keep your clothes wet by spraying it on your clothes. The more water you can evaporate off your clothes this way, the less water you lose in the form of sweat. The advice given by Bear Grylls in an episode ...


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Many others have mentioned the clothing, especially the color. I am also of the long-sleeved fraction, but! I don't think that sports clothing is your best bet. It is made from synthetics, and they cause a bit of greenhouse effect and don't wick sweat that well, despite the manufacturers' promises. In the really high heat, it's best to wear linen. It has a ...


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I can't rule out the possibility of taking a walk while it's, say, 39 degrees Celcius. Stay away from being outside for a long period of time when it's hot outside. If you want to explore the city, it might be best to set out early (7:30 AM latest) or in the late evening. From about 11AM-4PM is the warmest time of the day, so try to stay out of the heat ...


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We are Vegas locals, and love hiking. If you are going to hike in the hills, take tons of fluids. More than you think. Only because running out, cuts the fun short. Consider a hike in Mt Charleston. 20-30 degrees F cooler than downtown. Also consider hiking in Red Rock Ice Box Canyon (hint, hint -- the name). We like to trail run in the evening, after ...


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Vegas is a dry heat--while this is often scorned by those who don't understand the difference it means that your body can do a much better job of cooling itself than you might expect. Your body sweats, it very quickly evaporates and you are nowhere near as aware of the heat as you would think. As others have said, bring plenty to drink--although since you ...


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Stay hydrated. Be sure to drink lots of liquids, especially water. Avoid or minimize alcoholic, carbonated, and caffeinated beverages as these can dehydrate you. Drink more than you think you need. You need to replenish the liquid removed by sweating and sweating is a key part of keeping you cool. Persons who have epilepsy or heart, kidney, or liver ...


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Hydrate and cover your head, yes. Lightweight clothing, yes within reason but not gossamer see-through stuff. Colour is less of a big deal than you might expect but all else being equal you'll be a bit warmer in darker clothing, so avoid it. karancan already mentions sunscreen. I find that sunburn is orders of magnitude more uncomfortable than just missing ...


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My trick is to observe what locals do, humans tend to change their clothing style and sometimes diet to adopt better to their climate. For example, in the Middle East where it is hot and sunny people usually wear white cotton clothes, cover their heads and wear loose clothes. In other hot countries like far east they wear shorts and sleeveless clothes ...


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You may want to look into buying clothing specifically marketed as keeping you cool. I regularly ride my bike 15 km in 30 C heat. In a white cotton tshirt, sweat runs down my arms and I have trouble gripping the handlebars. In a long sleeved "performance " shirt I feel much cooler (even in a dark blue one) and sweat far less. I also drink less water in those ...


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Don't think you can walk at your normal pace when it's much hotter than you're used to. Take it easy and allow longer than you think it'll take to walk anywhere. Force yourself to walk more slowly any time you catch yourself going quickly.


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I'm resident in Canada and occasionally travel to Dubai to visit my parents. I am in Dubai right now and it was 44 degrees Celsius this afternoon. Note that I am used to wearing shorts even when it is lower than 0 Celsius while in Canada. Here is what I have for you: Clothing Absolutely avoid long sleeved clothing Wear shorts instead of jeans or other ...


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Wear white clothing. Wet a towel or a cloth with water and put it over your head and put a hat or cap over your head.


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I don't know where the info is coming from. We have dual citizenship, British/Canadian and live in Canada (for 52 years) and travelled to England for a month (June). My wife got sick and needed medical attention. There was no question about residency or anything else. She received the attention she needed and was told that any visitor to England receives ...


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The only folks who can accurately answer your question regarding any new laws would be the Immigration Office. With the military government's push towards following the rule of law it is hard to guess how strict immigration will be from here forward. Your friend might wish to prepare by documenting his illness, bills or invoices from the hospital, a letter ...


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The worse thing that can happen is having to pay for the treatment yourself, possibly at some inflated/non-regulated price. A slightly less serious problem is having to pay the regular price out of pocket, with a lot of paperwork to recover (some of) the money. I don't think you could be refused treatment for an emergency in the EU countries I know. Also ...


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Yes you do need one. As someone from the UK who had to use a doctor in Spain, you will be presented with an estimate of charges which you will need to pay by credit or debit card before treatment begins. The initial consult with a GP can cost several hundred pounds before any real treatment happens. I made sure we had EHIC cards as soon as we got home, and ...


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AFAIK, an MRI does not necessarily needs to be prescribed, you could in principle simply make an appointment with an imagery lab. Usually, patients would have a referral letter by their general practitioner or another physician, which would indicate what needs to be done and why but that's not really a “prescription” like the ones you need to get restricted ...


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The US Customs and Border Protection branch of the Department of Homeland Security has a Prohibited and Restricted Items page. About half way down it discusses Medications. As link-only answers are frowned upon (due to stale links for one thing), I have reproduced the relevant section here: Medication Rule of thumb: When you go abroad, take the ...


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In my experience flying to the US (about 25 times in the last 10 years), I never once was asked to prove anything related to the medication. I had brought prescription antibiotics with me before, on one or two trips - and wasn't even asked anything at all. They were also in blister packs, all in my hand luggage. I had more questions asked in Australia ...



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