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1

This is a common problem, especially if you have a flu and your nose is clogged. What usually does the trick for me is: yawning. luckily flights make me tired in some way gulping. chewing gum and a bottle of water will be helpful. A quick google for "ear pressure relief" adds to the list: "Inhale, and then gently exhale while holding the nostrils ...


2

This is a common problem, especially if you have a flu and your nose is clogged. What usually does the trick for me is: yawning. luckily flights make me tired in some way gulping. chewing gum and a bottle of water will be helpful. A quick google for "ear pressure relief" adds to the list: "Inhale, and then gently exhale while holding the nostrils ...


1

The best way is to have a chewing gum. You can also block your nostrils, close your mouth and push the air through your ear conduits. If you have a cold, it might get worse. There are some medicines available to take before the flight.


4

Alternatively, you could just do it yourself: http://www.wikihow.com/Remove-Stitches I probably would for 2 stitches.


8

Public system Any nurse can do that also in Portugal. Going to a "centro de saúde" is a good choice. These are part of the national health system. In principle you don't need an appointment. Just go there and explain the reason. That is so fast and simple that they may solve it immediately. Be prepared and take some "patience" with you though. The system ...


2

Yes Source : I live in Delhi (plenty of mosquitoes here) and have seen this happening my self.


22

It's safe. Per both the Japan Radiation Map and Safecast, radiation levels in Hokkaido are safe (green) at less than 0.05 microSieverts (μSv) per hour, or 1.2 μSv/day. For comparison, if you live in a brick or concrete house you get a dose of about 70 μSv/year, and if you spend 14 hours on a plane, you will get a dose of around 100 μSv from atmospheric ...


1

Malaria is not an extremely serious concern in Mumbai, especially if you are only going to be there a week, and the thin protection that anti-malarials give you isn't really worth the nausea they deliver much more reliably. My recommendation for anywhere that isn't an actual swamp is DEET, a effective, long-acting insect repellent. It chases away ...


4

Chicken Pox Mumbai is a hotter place than Poland and it is best to carry tabs for Chicken pox if you are supposed to travel during Summer. Chicken pox is more common than Malaria. Unlike Malaria you may not find tablets for Chicken pox in many pharmacies particularly if you are outside the city. This is mainly due to the fact that we Indians mainly use Neem ...


3

Starting from 6th of April 2015 all British expats living outside the EEA will have to pay for NHS services. Emergency treatment remains free as before but if you need ongoing care after the initial emergency treatment then you will have to pay 150% of normal NHS charges. This was not the case before, all British expats who were drawing a UK pension had ...


0

Everybody receives the emergency healthcare they need in the UK. The National Health Service says (source): Once the hospital has established that you must pay for treatment, you will usually be asked to pay the full cost in advance, unless emergency treatment is required immediately. [...] If you are not entitled to receive free NHS hospital ...


2

Living in the US, with a Green Card, I had to do the same thing for visas some months ago [you again? me again!]. Fortunately, our HR department was able to provide this (by calling the Health Insurance and getting it - the letter was from the Health insurance). Note that the letter did not fulfill the technical requirements (naming the insured amount and ...


5

The US Department of Transport has a general ruling for airlines subject to DOT rules. The limit of one carry-on bag and one personal bag (e.g., purse or briefcase) for each traveler does not apply to medical supplies and/or assistive devices (including service animals and their equipment). Passengers with disabilities generally may carry medical ...


1

I have lived in a town the middle of South India for years. There are hundreds of foreigners living in my town. There are also thousands visiting each year. I've never heard of anyone taking malaria pills. Nor have I heard of even a single case of Malaria in this area. This is just some personal experience.


2

The Air Quality Index There are several air quality monitoring websites out there. These use an Air Quality Index (AQI) ranging from 0 to 500, where a 0 indicates good air quality, and 500 indicates hazardously unhealthy air, as detailed in the table below: Worldwide Air Quality Monitors The World Air Quality Index Team runs an online real-time ...


7

I would recommend looking at this live and historical dataset of air quality, mapped out globally. Values over 100 indicate the air quality could be problematic for sensitive groups, such as asthmatics. . It's important to note that air quality varies a lot based on time of year, weather, etc. so look at the values for the same dates as you plan to travel ...


4

Opposite to @jpatokal answer, I'd say that you can do it safely on Iquitos-Perú, where a lot of people often go to do this "ceremonies" and there are a lot of places that offers this service, for example this. The price is around 100$ per person per day (It's a pack that goes from 2 days to 8 days, depending on where you go to do it). For further ...


19

Your best bet would likely be to go to Brazil and join a church ceremony. Ayahuasca is legal there for religious use, and there are several well-established churches that use it regularly with a track record of not killing their members, most notably Santo Daime and União do Vegetal. Church ceremonies (and the effects of ayahuasca) can last up to 12 hours, ...



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