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3

The bad news is: it's such a broad topic & there are so many insurers out there that it's very time consuming to understand which insurances are actually "good" for you. The good news is: I had the same problem & did loads of research, so read on! Regarding health-related insurances, you are looking for what is usually called an "international ...


3

When you look at ingredients, the ones which were classified as allergens are now bolded. This includes some americanisms like milk listing as ingredients 100% milk (bolded) with a note that this contains milk :)


1

A friend of mine had her knee in a plaster cast when in Taizé for a visit, three years running. No bending of the leg at all. In Taizé at the time they had very few sit down toilets and mostly squat ones. The sit down ones always had long lines and she did not want to walk long distance and wait (or be lucky to be let in ahead of the queue) so she tried and ...


1

A friend of mine who has a long list of allergies and intolerances makes her own translation list for each country where she is going. With a diverse list like Pork and Chicken (but no other meats) Apricots, several nuts but not all, some spices, apples and milk in all its shapes, she will have to talk with the staff in restaurants wherever she eats. But as ...


2

I've very bad knees after a traffic accident some 20 years ago and have had to deal with it. The answer is simple but not pleasant: finish as quickly as possible and hope it doesn't hurt too much. If there's somewhere you can support yourself, it's a lot easier, whether a wall, door, or anything you can use. Just be happy you're not a local with arthritis ...


9

No need to squat... You can approach this challenge with the sort of gear one sees at the Glastonbury Festival... This is a small, light-weight, aluminum frame with a canvas seat. The seat has a convenient hole in it. The whole ensemble fits comfortably in a backpack or medium sized shoulder bag. It's weight and compactness lends itself to discrete ...


9

You need to be forward with the allergy, don't be shy and ASK. Have an "allergy translation card" (*) with you and/or with the person with the allergy. You need to have it with translation in the different languages that you will come into contact with in Europe. (*) google for that


14

A few observations (my nephew has a rather broad set of allergies so I have had to deal with this on several trips): In Germany, restaurant menus do mention allergens and additives. It seems to be mandatory EU-wide now but I have never seen it in France for example so I would not rely on it and ask for confirmation in any case. Industrial products and just ...


6

I tried the sauna idea myself before moving from the northern hemisphere (in the middle of winter) to the equator. There was no 'control' in that experiment, so I can't clearly say whether it worked or not. But another aspect of this is psychological. What seems unpleasant or normal depends on what you are used to. The strain of ...


12

TL;DR -> No, not really On the plus side, a sauna can get you accustomed to sweat. But a typical sauna session of 20 - 30 minutes will not include the activities you would undertake in a visit to Africa. It's also not the same kind of sweat you get in a tropical environment. Some evidence for acclimation is given by examining how the military trains ...


4

I don't know anything about preparing yourself or the physiology of it all but I can tell you that a sauna does not feel like a typical tropical climate at all. Of course, “tropics” is quite vague and covers many different areas but many places in Africa or South-East Asia are also very wet and, from experience, it's not like a sauna (which is very dry).


2

while it is possible to train yourself to endure harsh climatic conditions(such as cold or heat), is not something easily accomplish, as Lewis mentions first of all you have to be on a place where there is enough room for move or emulate your activities there not just sitting, also it is a process that takes much time(not a month or two more like some years) ...


2

Asking for medical advice on a forum, is probably not the ideal approach. You really need to talk about where you plan to go and what you plan to do, with your family physician since they know your health history and a tropical disease specialist, as they know what you might encounter. Sadly travel vaccination clinics tend to have a broad understanding ...


0

Bring your Doctor's report in English and you are allowed to take 3 months of supply of your medicine to Country. Workarounds to use it for 6 months: If you're using 5mg of some medicine, you may ask your Doctor to type 10mg daily usage on report. You may bring 10mg packs of 3 months supply. Take half everyday. You have 6 months supply. Australian ...


4

I travel in and out of Australia regularly with prescription medication, as well as over the counter stuff like paracetamol. As long as the prescription stuff is labelled, they never worry (at most they ask if you have enough for your stay in the country). I generally declare it anyway, but the over the counter stuff - there's a checkbox on the arrival ...


6

For those particular drugs, don't worry about it: acetaminophen, calcium carbonate (Tums) and loperamide (Imodium) are widely available over the counter in Australia itself. The Therapeutic Goods Administration page for visitors, and in particular its link to the entire list of prohibited substances (which doesn't contain any of those three), is useful for ...



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