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68

As part of a flight crew (I flew for middle east regional for the last 4 years with a B747), I am trained to help my passenger as best as I can. But I'm also trained to stay away from any possible hazard and to not taking extra responsibility whenever I can. Your medication is tied to your survival. That is not something I would gladly accept to be ...


63

It appears this is not possible for the Big Three US airlines. In fact, your assertion that "I know airplanes have" refrigerators on board seems to be not true in general. United Airlines: "Our aircraft do not have refrigerators on board, so please plan accordingly." Delta (under Special Concerns: Medicine): "Airplanes do not have refrigerators on board, ...


53

Good Samaritan laws vary from state to state in the USA (all 50 states have one). Most states provide some level of protection from liability to trained medical personal, doctors, nurses, first responders, etc. Whether your UK training / licensing would qualify would depend on the wording of that state's law. Some states provide even broader protections ...


28

There are two issues that sometimes get confused: What's allowed on the plane - This is determined by security rules. If a prescription drug is not a liquid that takes you over the liquids limit, then it's allowed. If it takes you over the limit, it's generally still allowed as long as you can prove that it was prescribed to you. Prescription drugs in pill ...


18

You can get arrested for any kind of physical behaviour between a fellow person, all it takes is a mistaken thought, a sensitive victim and a sheer amount of bad luck. Can it happen? Yes Will it happen? Maybe (Probably not) A lot of First aid is physical and not the soft kind of physical. It's an open ended book in which if you did somehow piss off that ...


16

Water regulations in Switzerland are very strict and most tap water is of impeccable quality. There is also a law which states that any fountain, which doesn't have regulated drinking water, has to be declared as such, so if you see a fountain with no sign on a village square, it's very likely safe to be drunk. This is most likely the reason why there is a ...


15

General Tips and Tricks There are various guides on the web focusing specifically on how to travel with a stoma. Most of which are written by authoritative associations, such as the UK Colostomy Association, Ostomy Lifestyle, and Securicare Medical just to mention a few. For a complete, portable tips-and-tricks guide, here is a Travel Advice PDF by the UK ...


14

TL;DR -> No, not really On the plus side, a sauna can get you accustomed to sweat. But a typical sauna session of 20 - 30 minutes will not include the activities you would undertake in a visit to Africa. It's also not the same kind of sweat you get in a tropical environment. Some evidence for acclimation is given by examining how the military trains ...


14

A few observations (my nephew has a rather broad set of allergies so I have had to deal with this on several trips): In Germany, restaurant menus do mention allergens and additives. It seems to be mandatory EU-wide now but I have never seen it in France for example so I would not rely on it and ask for confirmation in any case. Industrial products and just ...


13

I have a close friend who was diagnosed with G.A.D and panic attacks some years ago. I have been around and I have seen him suffer even when he travels with me, especially that he is a bit scared of flying, which triggers panic attacks for him. The following tips usually work but it might be different from one person to another, so feel free to tweak them a ...


11

The general advice when bringing medication is bring it in the original packaging. In the case of the prescription this includes the sticker with your name, doctor's name, date etc. Never just bring two or three loose pills in some other container if you have a copy of the prescription, or your receipt with your name, bring that too if the item doesn't ...


10

I would expect most countries to allow exceptions to their usual immigration procedures in cases of emergency (there may even be some pieces of international legislation about this). Japan does, in Article 17 of its Immigration Control and Refugee Recognition Act: In the case of disease or any other accident which urgently requires the landing of a ...


9

No need to squat... You can approach this challenge with the sort of gear one sees at the Glastonbury Festival... This is a small, light-weight, aluminum frame with a canvas seat. The seat has a convenient hole in it. The whole ensemble fits comfortably in a backpack or medium sized shoulder bag. It's weight and compactness lends itself to discrete ...


9

You need to be forward with the allergy, don't be shy and ASK. Have an "allergy translation card" (*) with you and/or with the person with the allergy. You need to have it with translation in the different languages that you will come into contact with in Europe. (*) google for that


9

Australia has Reciprocal Health Care Agreements with: New Zealand United Kingdom Republic of Ireland Sweden Netherlands Finland Italy Belgium Malta Slovenia Norway These agreements mean: Australian residents can get help with the cost of essential medical treatment when visiting these countries Full information about Reciprocal Health Care ...


9

I think that ultimately it is up to you to do whatever you feel like is safer for you. Given a choice nobody, be it here on TSE or elsewhere, will (want to) make this decision for you. What I can do however is to give you a few pointers to help you make an informed decision. Sinking Might Be Hard, Drowning Not so Much First things first the Dead Sea is ...


8

I was walking around Narita Airport (Tokyo) today during a transit, and saw these signs outside toilets that immediately reminded me of this question. It appeared that all the toilets in Terminal 2 ( where I was) had the facilities. Feeling curious, I also took a photo of what I presumed to be these facilities in the disabled toilet. Therefore, another ...


8

Personally I would be far more worried about Dengue, as you are traveling during the rainy season. Many more people catch Dengue than Malaria, partially because there is no preventative medicine (and Dengue is no fun, I speak from experience). The Thai government does record a number of cases of Malaria each year, but in terms of percentages and risks, it ...


8

The bad news is: it's such a broad topic & there are so many insurers out there that it's very time consuming to understand which insurances are actually "good" for you. The good news is: I had the same problem & did loads of research, so read on! Regarding health-related insurances, you are looking for what is usually called an "international ...


8

I went to Japan on Feb. 2014, I am allergic to shellfish. I did a lot of research. First thing, it is illegal to bring an epi-pen to Japan and almost impossible to get a special permit to get them in the country. I got the printed card and also a pandora charm that said I was allergic to shellfish. I carried with me Benadryl everywhere. Server at restaurants ...


8

For those particular drugs, don't worry about it: acetaminophen, calcium carbonate (Tums) and loperamide (Imodium) are widely available over the counter in Australia itself. The Therapeutic Goods Administration page for visitors, and in particular its link to the entire list of prohibited substances (which doesn't contain any of those three), is useful for ...


8

From the Department of Agriculture - Arriving in Australia page, there's a section for "Other items" that states: used sporting and camping equipment including tents, footwear, hiking boots, golf equipment and bicycles (need to be checked to ensure they are clean and free from soil contamination) It should be sufficient to clean your shoes ...


8

Like any medical specialists, in any country, advance booking is likely a necessity. You could walk in but if they're busy or on leave, you wouldn't be able to see anyone. So I'd recommend contacting a few in advance. This is relatively easy to do online: The Frank Pais Orthopedic Hospital in Havana (I saw this when I went through the city in July) has ...


8

The advice given to me in my paramedic course, and the advice I give my students is along the lines of: Anyone can sue you for anything at any time, for any reason. (They won't necessarily be successful.) If you act in the best interests of the patient, acting as a reasonable and prudent person, you'll most likely be fine. A lot of people that are sued for ...


8

Some countries require that in-bound flights to be disinfected (either flights arriving from all countries or certain countries that are known to be affected with certain diseases, such as Malaria). A couple of mosquitoes or other insects can reproduce in the destination country and over time they will cause a general health or agriculture problem. Even ...


8

I do not have a link to a scientific research to prove this, but as a crew member, in the airline crews community, Melatonin is one of the most used remedies to overcome jetlagging problem we face every week as a part of our job as we need to fix the jetlag problem after every flight to be able to operate the next assignment which might be less than a day ...


8

After a quick look on PubMed, I found a meta-study on the effects of melatonin in various contexts, published in Nutrition Journal (it's open access, so the article is freely accessible without any kind of academic subscription). It makes a "weak recommendation in favor of melatonin use for rebalancing the sleep-wake cycle in people with jet lag." Here are ...


7

After more than a decade in the cabin crew business, I think it's time now to share a tip or two I know: Keep your mind busy. Read a book, play a game on your smart phone, watch a movie, etc. Take an aisle seat. It will help you feel a bit in control when your anxiety peaks. A little walk around the cabin can relieve it. This is one of the cases where ...


7

I tried the sauna idea myself before moving from the northern hemisphere (in the middle of winter) to the equator. There was no 'control' in that experiment, so I can't clearly say whether it worked or not. But another aspect of this is psychological. What seems unpleasant or normal depends on what you are used to. The strain of ...


7

I'm pretty sure you don't have to see a doctor to get penicilin in Cambodia, I got some antibiotics from a nurse on Koh Rong. And pharmacy staff will definitely understand "penicilin". Still, it might be a good idea to see a doctor anyway instead of self-diagnosing and self-medicating. Best ask your hotel/hostel's staff, they should know a doctor who ...



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