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48

Unlike meat products and potatoes, grains like rice can be brought into Germany. Homeopathic remedies are not considered medicines in Germany, because their efficacy has not been proven. Legally, it's just sugar or alcohol, and unless you bring ridiculous amounts, you will not exceed the free import limit for alcohol. Finally, there is a limit on the total ...


7

In my experience flying to the US (about 25 times in the last 10 years), I never once was asked to prove anything related to the medication. I had brought prescription antibiotics with me before, on one or two trips - and wasn't even asked anything at all. They were also in blister packs, all in my hand luggage. I had more questions asked in Australia ...


6

Water, water and water. Drinking something is probably a good idea and with water you wouldn't get any sugar, which even seemingly healthy options like milk or fruit juice have in excess (thus optimizing your first criteria). For the rest, you should get food anyway (not necessarily during the flight, if it's short) so there is no reason to compromise on the ...


5

I personally have carried these these items from India to Sweden through Germany multiple times without any problems whatsoever. You should be fine. As Michael has already pointed out, these are not restricted items. Not that anyone bothers to check.


5

The US Customs and Border Protection branch of the Department of Homeland Security has a Prohibited and Restricted Items page. About half way down it discusses Medications. As link-only answers are frowned upon (due to stale links for one thing), I have reproduced the relevant section here: Medication Rule of thumb: When you go abroad, take the ...


4

AFAIK, an MRI does not necessarily needs to be prescribed, you could in principle simply make an appointment with an imagery lab. Usually, patients would have a referral letter by their general practitioner or another physician, which would indicate what needs to be done and why but that's not really a “prescription” like the ones you need to get restricted ...


4

I know about people who did similar things due to insufficient insurance. No problem for you, especially in different state. This is one of the reasons your bill was so high: hospital in USA is required to provide emergency care, but then is let high and dry to collect for provided services. You have to pay not only for you, but for many other people who ...


2

Same story, same problem. I have an unfortunate affinity for motion sickness. My first trip to the USA was ok, the second one was...a bit rough...This triggered exactly the same symptoms you are describing, getting tense when I am near the airport (and await flying) which is also triggering the slight nausea you mentioned. Like you I do not fear flying. I ...


1

The only folks who can accurately answer your question regarding any new laws would be the Immigration Office. With the military government's push towards following the rule of law it is hard to guess how strict immigration will be from here forward. Your friend might wish to prepare by documenting his illness, bills or invoices from the hospital, a letter ...


1

Yes you do need one. As someone from the UK who had to use a doctor in Spain, you will be presented with an estimate of charges which you will need to pay by credit or debit card before treatment begins. The initial consult with a GP can cost several hundred pounds before any real treatment happens. I made sure we had EHIC cards as soon as we got home, and ...


1

I don't know where the info is coming from. We have dual citizenship, British/Canadian and live in Canada (for 52 years) and travelled to England for a month (June). My wife got sick and needed medical attention. There was no question about residency or anything else. She received the attention she needed and was told that any visitor to England receives ...



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