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160

In Bulgaria, Russia, former USSR countries and others, it's considered offensive not to drink when you've been invited to, and you might need a good solid excuse if you decide not to drink at all. Expect to be on the receiving end of some good-natured banter if you decide to abstain completely. Medical reasons are a possibility, although it will be ...


81

When I flew from Vienna to Amsterdam and back, my fears were confirmed: The security staff inspected me very precise, and I had to explain them my story. Thank god I have some scars left so they believed me! It is not a problem. There are many, many people with metal implants and the standard procedure is simply explaining your condition after an ...


69

As part of a flight crew (I flew for middle east regional for the last 4 years with a B747), I am trained to help my passenger as best as I can. But I'm also trained to stay away from any possible hazard and to not taking extra responsibility whenever I can. Your medication is tied to your survival. That is not something I would gladly accept to be ...


64

It appears this is not possible for the Big Three US airlines. In fact, your assertion that "I know airplanes have" refrigerators on board seems to be not true in general. United Airlines: "Our aircraft do not have refrigerators on board, so please plan accordingly." Delta (under Special Concerns: Medicine): "Airplanes do not have refrigerators on board, ...


53

Good Samaritan laws vary from state to state in the USA (all 50 states have one). Most states provide some level of protection from liability to trained medical personal, doctors, nurses, first responders, etc. Whether your UK training / licensing would qualify would depend on the wording of that state's law. Some states provide even broader protections ...


51

I was in the unfortunate position of being insistingly encouraged to drink 3 years ago on the Trans-Siberian. I was much worse for wear after that experience, and sought out suggestions (in fact I really shouldn't have had that much considering my meds). Anyway, this year I returned. And indeed, the best way if you can't just refuse outright, is simply to ...


51

Unlike meat products and potatoes, grains like rice can be brought into Germany. Homeopathic remedies are not considered medicines in Germany, because their efficacy has not been proven. Legally, it's just sugar or alcohol, and unless you bring ridiculous amounts, you will not exceed the free import limit for alcohol. Finally, there is a limit on the total ...


50

I find several things help, some are physical or physiological while others are purely mental: I find it easier to adjust to "it's morning, get up now!" - as you get when you fly east - if I get light on my face as soon as possible. On the plane, open your shade, eat the "breakfast" they give you, and do the things you do in the morning. In a hotel, get ...


50

You'll certainly be allowed to get on a plane in the UK with the tea, but you'll have to declare it to Customs and may have it examined by an agricultural specialist, who will decide whether it is allowed in. Here's US Customs and Border Protection on importing tea: There are no restrictions on the importation of coffee, tea or spices for personal ...


46

Basically, you can't. The world is full of GI diseases, even in developed, First World nations. There are some decent steps to trying to minimize your exposure: Properly cooked foods. Everything heated to a proper internal temperature (depends on the dish, check the USDA's site for guidelines), no sampling the raw chicken dish, etc. For fruits and veg, if ...


42

Travelling by cargo ship (mostly container but also bulk or ro-ro, never heard anything about travelling on a tanker, presumably for safety reasons) is totally a thing. More info and links to specific agents can be found in previous questions tagged “freighter travel”. Many websites advertise specific journeys but you can always contact an agent and see what ...


39

Here are a few tips from the point of view of a cabin crew member: Always tell the cabin crew. No cabin crew member would want a passenger to vomit on the seat or floor. They will help you and even let you use the toilet in the worst times (shortly after take off or shortly before landing). Vomiting in the toilet is much easier and more comfortable - it is ...


36

As a Russian and non-drinker, I want to add some info about the culture of drinking in Russia. First of all: You don't have to drink vodka, even if your partners are. It is ok if you just say: I can't drink alcohol as strong as vodka, I need wine (or cocktails, or whatever you need). Ask women about this - they're more reliable in such situations. But if ...


35

An american software engineer living in Japan gives a good overview of how big Japan is and why you shouldn't be afraid to travel there after the nuclear accident. Essentially, the summary is that Japan is very large. It's unlikely that your travel plans as a tourist will be anywhere near the accident. Source: http://mapfrappe.com/index.html?show=3057


31

Is it possible? Yes it is, in most airplane models a pointed object (a pen or so) to be inserted in the small manual release opening in the oxygen mask compartment will release that specific mask. Are they released manually for sick passengers? No they are not, the seat oxygen masks are not meant for medical reasons, only for emergency reasons, namely ...


31

Low and central. The center (midships) is least affected by pitching (boat rotating up and down when moving into/with waves), and low floors are least affected by rolling (boat rotating side to side when the waves comes in from the side). Homework reading: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ship_motions


30

To @MeNoTalk's excellent answer, I'd like to add the passenger perspective: If you know that you may vomit during the flight, prepare yourself: Have a change of clothes in your carry-on, in case you manage to vomit over your shirt and pants, plus a plastic bag to store your dirty clothes. Bring tissues, or a towel, to clean up. Make sure that there ...


28

And we introduce Mark's patent-pending method to surviving the hell that is NZ to London superhaul economy class travel: Prepare your entertainment. Sure, you will likely have movies on the plane. But I've done several 10-13 hour trips with broken screens or no entertainment system - SINCE 2010. Don't bet on having it. Charge laptop batteries, iPads, ...


28

The cabin pressure is not constant - it's allowed to drop as the plane ascends, within safe levels (typically down to the pressure one would find at between 1500 and 2000 meters of altitude). The reason for this is that a pressure difference between inside and outside puts stress on the fuselage. Reducing the maximum difference allows the fuselage to be ...


28

Your question has both legal, but perhaps more important, also moral aspects. Generally speaking, when airborne, an aircraft is subject to the legislation of the carrier's home country. So far so good. I am not sure if medical doctors according to US law is both legally required to help in an emergency and liable to damages they inflict even if practicing ...


28

There are two issues that sometimes get confused: What's allowed on the plane - This is determined by security rules. If a prescription drug is not a liquid that takes you over the liquids limit, then it's allowed. If it takes you over the limit, it's generally still allowed as long as you can prove that it was prescribed to you. Prescription drugs in pill ...


27

Driving a car is the best excuse. The best solution is not hanging out with alcoholics who don't respect non-drinkers :-)


27

I'm a Russian who doesn't drink vodka. If your goal is not to drink at all - just say so and be done with that. If you like to drink a little but just don't want to kill your liver - tell them that you prefer cognac or whiskey (whichever you like the best). Wine will also work but probably raise a couple of "be a man" things. The goal is to have a drink ...


26

As far as I know, there is not such a world-wide standard, however there is an EU regulation. From www.europe.eu: A prescription delivered by a doctor in your country is valid in all EU countries. However, medicine prescribed in one country might not be available in another, or it may bear another name. As of 25 October 2013 you are able to ask ...


25

Well I'm a bit of a sub-expert on this, having worked nine years in the hostelling industry and encountering them as a traveller once in India. There's a bit of a dirty little secret in the hospitality industry about just how bad the bed bug problem has been for the past few years. Apparently all the big/expensive hotel chains have been having problems - ...


25

It's possible to travel on cargo ships, though I'm not sure how practical it is. There are certainly container ships sailing backwards and forwards between the west coast of the US and Japan (and China and other parts of east Asia). See, for example, this question.


24

Several non-authoritative points on the Amsterdam Red Light District: Personal safety: most of Amsterdam (including the RLD) is generally busy and safe. Working girls normally rent the same room repeatedly, and are generally traceable in case of crime. Since prostitution is above-board, police are aware of common problems and ready to assist if necessary. ...


24

MOST IMPORTANT: Get to an embassy/consulate. Identification can be done later. But if at all possible, that embassy/consulate is the most sensible, safest place for you to be. For example, let's say you're a Kiwi. Many countries have NZ embassies or consulates. Failing that, like when I needed one in Bolivia, there's the Australian embassy who will also ...


23

Final answer: Basically almost no pharmacy in Tajikistan knows of Warfarin, Coumadin or other variants. This includes the pharmacies at the CARDIOLOGY hospital in Dushanbe. However, on the grounds of said hospital is the English-speaking Prospekt Medical Center (based from London). They get requests for warfarin "on average, every 4 or so years" and as ...


23

How did I miss this question?? I've done this! Before it was even considered 'touristy' (we had to apply to the Ukrainian government for permission in 2008). Now on the safety aspect, I was assured by my science teacher travel buddy and the scientists there that it's perfectly fine to go for a day. As for the radiation, apparently even spending a weekend ...



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