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0

Some airlines (like Avianca in Colombia), have mail service that sends packages between airports, so another option could be sending the item to yourself and pick in your destination


7

I once realized I had my pocket knife with me and I was not checking any bags. I went outside and buried it in the dirt. A week later when I can back, I dug it back up.


9

Japan The time I made this mistake with a multi-tool in Toyama (around 2007 I think), I simply (and even with my limited Japanese it was simple) brought the situation to the attention of the checkpoint workers, who handed me a plastic bag with a form on it to fill out, stuck the article in the completed form-bag, tore the receipt off the top and handed it ...


13

This is clearly not allowed in hand luggage - nor in the checked in luggage. That is, you are not allowed to transport it by passenger plane at all. This page from the gov.uk site lists what's forbidden in hand luggage, related to weapons and ammunition (emphasis is mine): You can’t take any of these items as hand luggage or in the hold: ...


17

Something like this happened to me some years ago. I was flying from Sydney, Australia to Bali, Indonesia with China Airways - I think!? There was a final hand-luggage check at the departure gate. I was "randomly" picked and my bag was checked. Unfortunately, I'd completely forgotten that my Leatherman Wave was in my hand luggage! Apart from the initial ...


3

In most of the Europe, if you are found with prohibited items you are given a chance to go back to the Airline counter and arrange a checked in service (maybe meaning that you'll have to buy a bag to put it in).


3

If it is detected, you'll certainly have problems. They will ask you why you travel with such a replica. Even if you don't have bad ideas around it, one can certainly state that you could create a panic in the plane if someone sees it. So it will definitely be forbidden. It is the same as holding a fake gun in the street. People aren't supposed to know that ...


4

My home airport has a kiosk near where the line forms for security that's meant for mailing things that can't fly. It's nowhere near as obvious as it should be, I wasn't aware of it until the day I found myself almost in front of it waiting for my wife in the restroom. I wouldn't be surprised to learn that the security people know about it and can direct ...


9

In San Francisco (and probably other airports?) there are small self-serve dropboxes, next to the line to go through security. You can take an envelope from the supply on top, fill it out, including writing your credit card number down, and they will ship the contents to you for about $20. I did this a few years ago, when I forgot to leave my pocketknife ...


3

I would ask someone that is not going to fly to keep the item safe until my return, and offer money in order to do so. Even though you are asking a favor to a random stranger, this is not as awkward as it sounds. And there are plenty of options you could choose. This would work better if the person in question lives in the same city as you, but it really ...


19

This option is probably not available everywhere (but it's available in terminals 2, 3, 4 and 5 at Heathrow), it only works if you'll be back to the same airport at some point, and the cost may be a tad high if you'll be away for while (but probably cheaper than the fees for an extra checked bag): just leave the item as left luggage! The company managing ...


35

In the US, according to the TSA you have some options: When prohibited items come through the checkpoint, passengers are given options: Take the item to the ticket counter and check it in your baggage or a box provided by the airport. Many airports have a US Postal Service or other shipping services area where boxes, stamps and envelopes can ...


67

It happened to me once in London Heathrow. In my case I didn't have any emotional attachment to the item and it only cost around £3 to replace, so I threw it away, however I discussed with the security and the airline what my options were. They offered me the following options: Throw it away (I actually ended up doing just that) Post it to whatever ...


1

I have indeed seen counters that will pack and ship for you, at some expense. I believe I saw that in Zurich and London, but memory is foggy. I've also noticed long after that something prohibited went through without getting caught, which can be annoying in a difficult-to-describe way.


1

It is largely dependent on where you are. In general, the US take a more relaxed approach to skateboards and do allow these to be brought onto flights as carry-on. However many airports in the EU see the skateboard as a "blunt instrument" and don't allow them regardless of the stance of the airline. See this article: Can You Take a Skateboard Onto an ...


3

No, this seems to have changed. Apparently your trucks could be weaponised. Checked luggage is rarely stolen, the bigger risk seems to be it going to the wrong airport. If you're worried about theft wrap your bag properly so it's more hassle than it is worth. People who steal normally are more interested in macbooks and other such luxuries


3

The consensus on the internet is mixed, with people who managed to carry their soldering iron in hand luggage without any problems, as well as others who had it confiscated and thrown away by TSA. However, the TSA prohibited items search engine does not provide any indication on the topic. The only US-related official source I could find is the Delta ...


0

There are no restrictions from airlines to carrying a desktop computer in your carry-on (hand) luggage; as long as it fits the weight and size requirements. However, there are new requirements from the TSA regarding electronics: Electronic devices are already screened daily, but now, security officers might ask that you power up your devices, ...


3

I have traveled with a desktop unit as carry on from the US on a long haul to Asia. It was packed in a daypack, with a little padding between the unit and my back. The bag was pulled aside to be manually inspected at every security station I went through (three in total), but there were no issues nor any "why" questions. (have done it twice now) Just make ...


1

My recommendations would be to, use FedEx to transfer it to your new location and take the hard drive with you. TSA is very careful about those kind of things but, you can take it and check it in as fragile. I have taken tvs abroad with United as a check in not carry on.


1

I would just carry the hard drive(s) (if mechanical) and would consider taking the video card out and wrapping it in bubble wrap leaving it inside the PC case if it's a very expensive one. Desktop and tower PC cases tend to be pretty flimsy sheet metal so a certain amount of crushing is a possibility, especially if you didn't save the original box. It's ...


0

I always carry a mac pro (2013) for work stuff, traveled with it from/to USA, Spain and Mexico and never had a problem. Only problem I had was when I bring the computer with my carry on, the security guys always freak out when they see it with X-Ray machine, and always stops me and ask me what is that thing. I show them that is a computer and that's it. ...


0

I carried a desktop PC from Canada to another country. Since I was using a traditional hard drive rather than a SSD, I removed that and took it with me in my carry on. The actual desktop PC was packed in a regular suitcase surrounded by towels and clothes on all sides. When I opened the PC up to remove the hard drive, I also cleaned it out and double ...


4

Well, I got an answer back from Singapore Airlines. They responded from twitter: Hi Jason, it is advised that you use the ones on board due to safety concerns, thank you very much.


3

Here is a brief glossary and quick explanation of the things that might surprise you in Finnair's description: Carry-on is what you take with you in the cabin. It should generally fit in the overhead bins or under the seats and not lie around, especially during take-off and landing. Because of this, there is a separate maximum length, width and height ...


6

I am going to give you a different take on this question. It is in your question (customs) and seems to be overlooked in most answers. It is not really about planes, batteries, safety, or how big your bag is, it is mostly about the law of the departure and destination countries (not usually transit countries). Many countries prohibit what you can bring in ...


32

I am a software engineer and I also test the software on many different smartphones and tablets. I fly frequently within Europe, so my answer will be limited to this area. However, this is also from west to east and east to west, outside of the Schengen region! As a Dutch citizen, I rarely need a visa to travel, which makes this easy. I do carry a lot of ...


17

There are three concerns: 1) terrorism; 2) export/import limitations; and 3) the fire hazard from the lithium contained in the cell phone and laptop batteries. Terrorism: the difficulty of addressing terrorism is that the level of screening and scrutiny is often arbitrary depending on the current political climate and the capriciousness of the security ...



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