Hot answers tagged

134

"My bag has medication in which I may need during the flight" would normally be sufficient to get the cabin crew to select a different bag. You bag is more important than other people's.


76

It happened to me once in London Heathrow. In my case I didn't have any emotional attachment to the item and it only cost around £3 to replace, so I threw it away, however I discussed with the security and the airline what my options were. They offered me the following options: Throw it away (I actually ended up doing just that) Post it to whatever ...


66

You have no right to the bin above your seat. For those exit rows where you cannot put anything beneath the seat in front of you, flight attendants will generally try to help find some space somewhere for at least your small personal item, but any passenger may be required to check their bags rather than put them in the overhead bin. It is entirely possible ...


40

In the US, according to the TSA you have some options: When prohibited items come through the checkpoint, passengers are given options: Take the item to the ticket counter and check it in your baggage or a box provided by the airport. Many airports have a US Postal Service or other shipping services area where boxes, stamps and envelopes can ...


39

If your handheld bag is small enough to go under the seat in front of you, it won't be taken from you. If you want to bring a large roll-a-bord to save checking a bag, you can do that, but keep the things you genuinely need during the flight in a separate smaller bag. Also, do not choose a seat, such as the first seat in economy, that doesn't have a "seat in ...


32

I am a software engineer and I also test the software on many different smartphones and tablets. I fly frequently within Europe, so my answer will be limited to this area. However, this is also from west to east and east to west, outside of the Schengen region! As a Dutch citizen, I rarely need a visa to travel, which makes this easy. I do carry a lot of ...


29

There are two potential issues here: Airport security and customs. For airport security: In the UK, "Liquids include liquid or semi-liquid foods, eg soup, jam, honey and syrups" and "Liquids in containers larger than 100ml generally can’t go through security even if the container is only part full." Exemptions (e.g. essential medical purposes) don't seem ...


29

Typically, the bins really are full because there is not enough space to fit everything if the plane is completely full and everybody uses their allowance to the fullest. Also, some overhead bins contain material for the safety procedure demonstration, etc. so you can't count on enough space being available right above your seat (and I have never heard of a ...


25

Nutella is pretty similar to toothpaste in terms of viscosity. Since toothpaste counts as a liquid (source: http://ec.europa.eu/transport/modes/air/security/aviation-security-policy/lags_en.htm), it is reasonably safe to assume that Nutella does so as well. Also, this page lists "pastes, jams and jellies" as liquids. The latter page is for British Airways ...


25

The following is a list of the sort of items you should include in your cabin luggage (eg. not your checked luggage): All valuables (jewelry, money, etc) Important documents (passport, itinerary, hotel reservations, medical prescriptions, etc) All electronics (phone, laptop, mp3 players, etc) Anything fragile or which might break due to rough or careless ...


24

Here's my take (please take with a grain of salt, it's based on general travel knowledge and not on any specific experiences like this): People travel with unusual equipment all the time. There's all kinds of scientific, industrial, professional audio, professional photography, etc. equipment, people do try and take all this expensive equipment in hand ...


23

You could wear a fanny pack (a.k.a. hip pack) and keep your meds in that. Then you wouldn't even need to put it under the seat in front of you - it'd just be around your waist the whole time. Image:


23

In general, as long as the box meets the size and weight restrictions for carry-on luggage, you can bring it into the cabin. Luggage restrictions generally do not concern the material from which the luggage is made.


22

Books are heavier, period. Your typical cheap-ass perfect-bound B&W 300-page airport paperback detective/romance novel weighs around 441 grams. A nice hardback or a big chunky guidebook will be more: Lonely Planet India is over 1 kg, and a 500-page ream of A4 printing paper is well over 2 kg! A T-shirt occupies roughly the same volume as that ...


22

This option is probably not available everywhere (but it's available in terminals 2, 3, 4 and 5 at Heathrow), it only works if you'll be back to the same airport at some point, and the cost may be a tad high if you'll be away for while (but probably cheaper than the fees for an extra checked bag): just leave the item as left luggage! The company managing ...


20

I've travelled from the UK to many European computer/hacker festivals over the last 10 years or so, often taking strange devices similar to yours (homebrew machines, Raspberry Pi boards, 80s retro computers...) through airport and Eurostar security - and I'd say that about 80% of the time it attracts no attention at all - it just goes through the X-ray with ...


20

A few bonus tips to go with Roddy of the Frozen Peas excellent answer: Don't make the bag too big, as it will be taking up some of your legroom. Some aircraft have electronics boxes for the in-flight entertainment system under the seat, which further reduces the available space. You can always put it in the overheard if there's space, particularly if you ...


19

Something like this happened to me some years ago. I was flying from Sydney, Australia to Bali, Indonesia with China Airways - I think!? There was a final hand-luggage check at the departure gate. I was "randomly" picked and my bag was checked. Unfortunately, I'd completely forgotten that my Leatherman Wave was in my hand luggage! Apart from the initial ...


18

According to IATA Dangerous Good regulations, torches are not allowed in carry-on or checked in baggage, nor filled with gas, nor empty, even if unused. I've heard some airports in EU do allow such items on board, but I've never seen any hard evidence of such cases happening. Source: Experience, IATA DGR


17

Yes, and there are great articles online detailing travelling with condoms. They're not liquids, flammable or on any of the TSA unapproved lists, so you're totally fine to take them. However, remember they're meant to be stored at room temperature as they are still medical devices you don't want to take risks with damaging them. Don't store them with sharp ...


16

The British Airways page on liquids, banned and restricted items has a link to a PDF document detailing the items which cannot be carried as cabin luggage. This document mentions toy guns as being forbidden in carry-on luggage (emhpasis mine): PASSENGERS AND CABIN BAGGAGE Without prejudice to applicable safety rules, passengers are not permitted ...


16

There are three concerns: 1) terrorism; 2) export/import limitations; and 3) the fire hazard from the lithium contained in the cell phone and laptop batteries. Terrorism: the difficulty of addressing terrorism is that the level of screening and scrutiny is often arbitrary depending on the current political climate and the capriciousness of the security ...


16

No. The rules are crystal clear. They are not in the business of measuring how much liquid you have, they judge based on the container. Even when it's crystal clear there is extremely little liquid they will demand throwing it away if it's in a too large container like a sip on the bottom of a water bottle. Edit: as a rule maker, if your goal is to regulate ...


14

This kind of equipment is effectively a gas-powered "blue flame" (oxygen-premixed burner). Such items are explicitly forbidden by IATA, in both carry-on and checked baggage. Source (see note at the end of the document). Also, I own such torch, and it was sold pre-charged.


14

This is clearly not allowed in hand luggage - nor in the checked in luggage. That is, you are not allowed to transport it by passenger plane at all. This page from the gov.uk site lists what's forbidden in hand luggage, related to weapons and ammunition (emphasis is mine): You can’t take any of these items as hand luggage or in the hold: ...


13

First, make sure the bags you have fall within the airline's official limits. They vary by airline and a few times by aircraft-type within an airline. They always ask to store the biggest bags first, so your chances of being asked will be much smaller if you are among those that simply fit. Take a carry on and a personal item which is something allowed by ...


13

You quote the TSA: Medically required liquids, such as baby formula and food, breast milk and medications are allowed in excess of 3.4 ounces in reasonable quantities for the flight. The key is "reasonable quantities for the flight." For most people, 3.4 ounces of contact lens solution is far more than would be needed for a single flight. If you ...


12

Within the EU, you can bring the water gun, but not the nerf gun in your cabin luggage. The relevant EU regulation ban 'devices that discharge projectiles', which should cover the nerf gun. The water gun is ok as long as it is obviously a toy gun and is not 'appearing capable, of being used to cause serious injury by discharging a projectile'. Categories ...


12

In addition to very good other answers: Do not use a rollaboard. Those are the most popular for going to the hold. Some airlines guarantee the first X pieces in cabin then systematically start checking in other hand luggage. Yes, I am looking at you, RyanAir. I'm always one of the last passengers to board and always travel with a backpack. They never ask me ...


12

Travelling with LIPO's The content of this answer is largely borrowed and quoted from my other answer on a similar topic. The regulation regarding quadcopters and check-in luggage is fairly new. Since these devices are becoming increasingly common in industry, academia, and everyday life the legal bureaucracy is somewhat lagging behind and is slowly ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible