Hot answers tagged

133

"My bag has medication in which I may need during the flight" would normally be sufficient to get the cabin crew to select a different bag. You bag is more important than other people's.


70

Maybe not exactly the answer to your question, but according to this site (see Section XIV, Chapter 71, HS code 7108131000), Russia imposes a 20% customs duty on the importation of gold bars. So unless you have 5.3 million rubles on hand to pay the customs duty (or can break off a fifth of the bar), expect the customs officers to hold on to your gold bar ...


59

It's allowed, I have personally seen a passenger who booked a seat for a bag. I then asked the passenger and he said it was gold. I was an operating flight attendant. I also do not recall any rules regarding prohibiting gold onboard, (from an aviation point of view) unless it was in the shape of a knife I assume. Just check with the airline you are flying ...


45

Outside of an emergency evacuation or similarly dire situation, I cannot think of any reason why a civil authority would ban a person from purchasing multiple seats. After all, it is not uncommon for people to purchase an additional seat to carry items like musical instruments or pets, or because they do not fit into a single seat. In consideration of this, ...


38

If your handheld bag is small enough to go under the seat in front of you, it won't be taken from you. If you want to bring a large roll-a-bord to save checking a bag, you can do that, but keep the things you genuinely need during the flight in a separate smaller bag. Also, do not choose a seat, such as the first seat in economy, that doesn't have a "seat in ...


32

I am a software engineer and I also test the software on many different smartphones and tablets. I fly frequently within Europe, so my answer will be limited to this area. However, this is also from west to east and east to west, outside of the Schengen region! As a Dutch citizen, I rarely need a visa to travel, which makes this easy. I do carry a lot of ...


29

Anecdotally, you can buy gold at a vending machine in Abu Dhabi airport, in the outgoing terminal. Whilst policies at destinations will vary of course, it's highly unlikely to be widely illegal whilst being sold at an airport. Gold ATMs are available across the world - not sure I would have believed it if I hadn't seen it myself while transiting through Abu ...


25

I frequently fly all over Europe with shoe-box PC's or various measuring devices in carry on luggage. The measuring equipment is very expensive: € 250.000 is pretty normal for a single device. You don't want to let it out of your sight or risk a baggage-handler to throw a suitcase around. And they don't like temperature fluctuations much (calibration ...


24

Nutella is pretty similar to toothpaste in terms of viscosity. Since toothpaste counts as a liquid (source: http://ec.europa.eu/transport/modes/air/security/aviation-security-policy/lags_en.htm), it is reasonably safe to assume that Nutella does so as well. Also, this page lists "pastes, jams and jellies" as liquids. The latter page is for British Airways ...


24

Here's my take (please take with a grain of salt, it's based on general travel knowledge and not on any specific experiences like this): People travel with unusual equipment all the time. There's all kinds of scientific, industrial, professional audio, professional photography, etc. equipment, people do try and take all this expensive equipment in hand ...


23

You could wear a fanny pack (a.k.a. hip pack) and keep your meds in that. Then you wouldn't even need to put it under the seat in front of you - it'd just be around your waist the whole time. Image:


22

Books are heavier, period. Your typical cheap-ass perfect-bound B&W 300-page airport paperback detective/romance novel weighs around 441 grams. A nice hardback or a big chunky guidebook will be more: Lonely Planet India is over 1 kg, and a 500-page ream of A4 printing paper is well over 2 kg! A T-shirt occupies roughly the same volume as that ...


19

You are carrying a half-million dollars in gold on your person and you are flying into... Russia? Keep a sharp eye out. As Nate points out, you may have to pay an import duty in Russia, but apparently there are no restrictions on the British end. In the US, you would have to declare it. Last year, I got into a nasty run-in with ICE who were convinced I ...


19

I've travelled from the UK to many European computer/hacker festivals over the last 10 years or so, often taking strange devices similar to yours (homebrew machines, Raspberry Pi boards, 80s retro computers...) through airport and Eurostar security - and I'd say that about 80% of the time it attracts no attention at all - it just goes through the X-ray with ...


17

Yes, and there are great articles online detailing travelling with condoms. They're not liquids, flammable or on any of the TSA unapproved lists, so you're totally fine to take them. However, remember they're meant to be stored at room temperature as they are still medical devices you don't want to take risks with damaging them. Don't store them with sharp ...


17

According to IATA Dangerous Good regulations, torches are not allowed in carry-on or checked in baggage, nor filled with gas, nor empty, even if unused. I've heard some airports in EU do allow such items on board, but I've never seen any hard evidence of such cases happening. Source: Experience, IATA DGR


17

There are three concerns: 1) terrorism; 2) export/import limitations; and 3) the fire hazard from the lithium contained in the cell phone and laptop batteries. Terrorism: the difficulty of addressing terrorism is that the level of screening and scrutiny is often arbitrary depending on the current political climate and the capriciousness of the security ...


16

Short answer to the question in the topic: yes. It may depend on the airline but e.g. EasyJet explicitly states "including handles and wheels" and I would say it is a general rule. In your case it may be not allowed. Size may be checked at the gate by having you put your bag into a box/cage of those dimensions. Obviously, if the handle gets in a way, it ...


16

The British Airways page on liquids, banned and restricted items has a link to a PDF document detailing the items which cannot be carried as cabin luggage. This document mentions toy guns as being forbidden in carry-on luggage (emhpasis mine): PASSENGERS AND CABIN BAGGAGE Without prejudice to applicable safety rules, passengers are not permitted ...


13

First, make sure the bags you have fall within the airline's official limits. They vary by airline and a few times by aircraft-type within an airline. They always ask to store the biggest bags first, so your chances of being asked will be much smaller if you are among those that simply fit. Take a carry on and a personal item which is something allowed by ...


13

This kind of equipment is effectively a gas-powered "blue flame" (oxygen-premixed burner). Such items are explicitly forbidden by IATA, in both carry-on and checked baggage. Source (see note at the end of the document). Also, I own such torch, and it was sold pre-charged.


12

In addition to very good other answers: Do not use a rollaboard. Those are the most popular for going to the hold. Some airlines guarantee the first X pieces in cabin then systematically start checking in other hand luggage. Yes, I am looking at you, RyanAir. I'm always one of the last passengers to board and always travel with a backpack. They never ask me ...


12

I think the answer is the same than for your other question. As WiFi stations are not listed in the list of forbidden items you should be able of carrying one in your hand luggage. The only restriction that you should find is that it might be turned off for the entire flight.


12

How would you answer the following question? Are you aware of all the contents of your bags? Technically, you should not carry this in any of your bags (checked or not), because you don't know what it is. However, if you trust the person who packed or wrapped this, then you should be fine. Depending on where you are flying, you may or may not be able ...


11

A friend of mine has a small glass (beer, wine, vodka, whisky, etc.) collection and I buy glasses every now and then for him when I travel. I know it's probably not the same but most of the tips can probably be applied to any other fragile item. Glasses can be very fragile, specially the ones with a foot. I have transported them both in hand luggage and ...


11

Not exactly your destination, but Werner Rydl was arrested in Brazil when he was carrying a bar of gold. Also others have been arrested when they were unable to promptly provide the origin of the gold they were carrying. Since you said in some comment that you will just transport the gold but you're not the owner of it... You'd be a mule, or, if you were ...


11

Within the EU, you can bring the water gun, but not the nerf gun in your cabin luggage. The relevant EU regulation ban 'devices that discharge projectiles', which should cover the nerf gun. The water gun is ok as long as it is obviously a toy gun and is not 'appearing capable, of being used to cause serious injury by discharging a projectile'. Categories ...


11

Travelling with LIPO's The content of this answer is largely borrowed and quoted from my other answer on a similar topic. The regulation regarding quadcopters and check-in luggage is fairly new. Since these devices are becoming increasingly common in industry, academia, and everyday life the legal bureaucracy is somewhat lagging behind and is slowly ...


11

This Has Been Done Before Setting aside my personal opinion on the reason motivating you to carry a Geiger counter on a plane, you'll be happy to know that this has been done before. Indeed people have carried Geiger counters in hand luggage, according to a quick google search. Some had problems going through security, arguably because the product was ...


11

You quote the TSA: Medically required liquids, such as baby formula and food, breast milk and medications are allowed in excess of 3.4 ounces in reasonable quantities for the flight. The key is "reasonable quantities for the flight." For most people, 3.4 ounces of contact lens solution is far more than would be needed for a single flight. If you ...



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