Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

40

Outside of an emergency evacuation or similarly dire situation, I cannot think of any reason why a civil authority would ban a person from purchasing multiple seats. After all, it is not uncommon for people to purchase an additional seat to carry items like musical instruments or pets, or because they do not fit into a single seat. In consideration of this, ...


21

I frequently fly all over Europe with shoe-box PC's or various measuring devices in carry on luggage. The measuring equipment is very expensive: € 250.000 is pretty normal for a single device. You don't want to let it out of your sight or risk a baggage-handler to throw a suitcase around. And they don't like temperature fluctuations much (calibration ...


18

Knives don't go in carry-on, period. (maybe really small ones, depending on the country.) The material the knife is made of doesn't matter. Ceramic, wood (ebony will hold a nice edge), bone, flint and so on have all made fine weapons millenia before steel. If you do pack a non-metallic weapon in the darker corners of your carry-on, and they find it, you ...


18

No. Restricted items may only be carried in checked luggage. However, Singapore Airlines permits you to check at least 30 kg for free, so I would suggest you simply check your carry-on luggage.


17

The rules about knives through airport security vary from country to country. Generally, they all include "a blade over x cm in length". While x may vary, your blade looks to be at most 4 cm or 1.5". So if the rule is a blade over 5cm/2" is not allowed, you'll be fine. I think that is the rule most places, and there was talk of raising it to 7cm in the US ...


16

Short answer to the question in the topic: yes. It may depend on the airline but e.g. EasyJet explicitly states "including handles and wheels" and I would say it is a general rule. In your case it may be not allowed. Size may be checked at the gate by having you put your bag into a box/cage of those dimensions. Obviously, if the handle gets in a way, it ...


15

No, a standard 22" rollaboard suitcase won't fit in a CRJ overhead bin. In my experience, most airlines that fly the CRJ and similarly sized regional aircraft use a "gate check" system: luggage that is of "carry-on size" (i.e. would fit in a larger airliner's bin) but doesn't actually fit in the bin on the aircraft in use will be taken from you at the gate, ...


14

I've had two battery packs / power banks, and travelled to several countries with several airlines, taking them as carry on, without any problem...until... Last year, I flew from Tokyo Haneda, via Beijing, China to Vancouver, Canada. In Beijing, Chinese officials sent me to a security point, where several people including myself had our power banks taken ...


12

Out of first hand experience with this as a previous cabin crew, sometimes the cabin crew of a flight signal the ground agents about the overhead compartments being full in the middle of the boarding process, so to avoid possible delays if removing excess hand luggage from the cabin is needed, the ground agents will prohibit cabin luggage for the remaining ...


11

A friend of mine has a small glass (beer, wine, vodka, whisky, etc.) collection and I buy glasses every now and then for him when I travel. I know it's probably not the same but most of the tips can probably be applied to any other fragile item. Glasses can be very fragile, specially the ones with a foot. I have transported them both in hand luggage and ...


9

Nothing official. But on several discussions from 2010 and 2012 including FlyerTalk there seem to be no issues related to bringing laser range finders on board. The only specifics from the TSA is the list of prohibited items, which doesn't include laser rangefinders.


8

In practice (as opposed to "officially")... I carry one of these on my keychain, with 6 or 7 other keys. I've flown US domestic flights with it about half a dozen times and never had a problem. I gave one to all my coworkers for Christmas a few years back. One of these coworkers is a Muslim woman who wears a hijab. She flies a lot, and ALWAYS gets ...


8

As an objective criteria I would suggest packing things so that the suitcase could be dropped from a height of 3' (1m) in any orientation without damage. Doing that, I have had no problems with broken glass bottles or other relatively fragile stuff. If you can fit the items into a shoe or boot, that helps, and of course surround it with clothes and keep it ...


8

It would depend on the security officer that checks you in and the country where your flight originates. TSA doesn't allow frying pans especially cast iron ones it's check only as evidenced in a blog from Forbes. TSA also has a mobile app now that you can look at. But since it's a flight originating from another country TSA rules may not apply so ...


8

Liquids and paste-like substances are prohibited, meaning that anything moist or canned in oil, brine, fruit juice, syrup, water or any other liquid will be prohibited too.


7

It depends on the size of your rollerboard. The overhead bin allows for a 52.5" × 14" × 9.5" bag, but, if memory serves, Delta makes passengers check all rollerboards on the CRJ-200 since they reserve the overhead space for soft-sided bags and jackets. Given that policy, the seat upgrade wouldn't give you any early boarding advantage so you ...


7

According to Ryanair, you are welcome to do so. As for diseases etc., the regulations usually regard meat and dairy products, but if you are traveling within EU, you are ok. Outside, however, it depends on the country. In my experience, ham and cheese sandwiches have never been a problem on European flights, including those with Ryanair. As long as it is ...


7

You may of course purchase an extra seat for luggage. This is common in a few situations when one cannot be separated from large cargo, the most obvious one being for transportation of musical instruments that are too fragile to go in the hold and too large to go in the cabin as hand luggage. You cannot keep your laptop on the seat during take off or ...


6

This trick is used by many Piece of Plastic on bottle before you close the cap That will prevent spills. After that put it in ziploc type plastic bag Check at home before you put it in luggage.


6

Most airports in "Schengen" follow all of the EU guidelines the IATA guidelines their own rules which they change every week (or while you are being controlled, or which the security guy makes up any way he feels) ... whichever is the most restrictive. The Frankfurt airport makes the first two available online in concise form, although only in German: ...


6

It seems that the blog entry you linked is outdated (2012), as a newer similar blog entry simply does not list the tennis rackets as a prohibited item onboard while it does list the other items. The TSA brochure has the most recent policies, which clearly allows it. Anyway, here is a list of some of the airlines policies regarding tennis racquets, they ...


6

There are limits that were introduced by the US Federal Aviation Administration. Those have been used as well by numerous other airlines, for example Cathay Pacific. They generally impose a limit on capacity per passenger and on top of this disallow checking them in, so you must take them into your hand luggage. If a website lists grams of Lithium, use this ...


6

Yes, of course it counts as "liquids". But 3.4oz (per product) is actually the limit of what you can take in carry-on baggage. So put it in a zip-top bag, place that one separately when you're at the security screening, and you're fine. Personally, I don't want to bother with all that and instead take a small stick-type solid deodorant in my carry-on.


6

The website of RyanAir states that food is okay to bring. I would suggest using a plastic bag or plastic container, instead of a metal container shaped as a bomb, but I guess that's pretty obvious. And there won't be any safety risks if you bring regular food like bread/sandwiches/etc. You can't bring drinks through the security check, however you can buy ...


6

No, they don't. Security looks for weapons and bombs; if it's not either, they're not interested. Of course, there's always the off chance that you'll run into some particularly zealous and clued-in inspector with a fetish for lithium batteries, but realistically I wouldn't worry about it. Also, 90% of the regulation you link to is about transporting ...


5

I don't think any airline would allow you to take that sword as carry-on luggage into the cabin with you. However, you should be able to check it in as luggage (but it may be considered oversize luggage, which may be an extra fee). Just be sure to pack it well (you can find info about packing actual swords as luggage online, which may be helpful).


5

There have been rules re carrying batteries for many years. They may be found in (at least) IATA documentation and also a number of courier companies and most battery manufacturers have advice documents. Removable batteries must be carried in carry-on luggage with the exception mentioned below. Having batteries in carry=on makes sense - would you rather ...


5

Canada The Canadian TSA website says that you can indeed pack disposable razors and cartridges in your carry-on: Disposable (safety) razors and blade cartridges Carry On Baggage: Yes Checked Baggage: Yes European Union Whereas the website of the European TSA-equivalent organisation mentions razors (without mentioning disposable or not) ...


5

Cameras when flying. You should always take expensive equipment, like cameras, in your hand luggage. If you have only the one battery it should sit in the camera. It is only when you have spare batteries that you might run into problems. But having traveled with one or even two spare batteries for my Canon super compact camera as well as a spare battery ...


4

The exact size limits for carry-on will depend on the airline, but your sword probably exceeds most airlines'. For example: Qantas's maximum dimension for a piece of carry-on luggage on a domestic flight is 115 cm (about 3' 9") Jetstar's is 56 cm (about 1' 10")



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible