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11

The problem isn't the Thermometer bit, it's the mercury bit. Mercury and Aluminium really don't play well together. Well, depending on your point of view, you might say they play excellently together, but the outcome is you destroy the structure and strength of your aluminium. The problem with this is that much of the plane (including the fuselage) is made ...


7

The rules regarding carry-on or hand luggage are clear enough when it comes to items that are obviously dangerous, like knives, guns, explosives or other obviously dangerous items. The problem is Civil Aviation Authorities and airlines can not make a list of all possible dangerous items because there are new items almost everyday. To overcome this dilemma, ...


7

In any case, if it is not framed, I would consider rolling it up and putting it into a cardboard picture tube. There are some with a fairly large diameter. Most universities send out the diplomas in such tubes anyhow. Otherwise, get 1 envelope, 2 layers of hard cardboard, and a larger envelope, best a padded one. You put the diploma into the envelope. Then ...


6

In addition to notes and posters near the check-in counters, I have seen three different styles of checking hand-luggage policy: Airport security during security check (most airports) An airport employee before the security check, sometimes with a scale (for example, CMN) An employee hanging around the check-in counters, checking passengers and advice them ...


6

I had the opportunity to check the measures of the Ryanair "baggage sizer" yesterday even though I hadn't a meter with me. My hand luggage fitted almost perfectly so I can say that the size of the baggage sizer is roughly 23 x 43 x 50 (the last measure is probably the least important one since it is open on top). In the end, you have something like 3 or 4 ...


5

There are blogs on the subject of what actually happens with the confiscated items: The Week TSA and there are a few others. Basically TSA confiscated items that can be resold are being resold through the Surplus program run by the state where the airport is located. So for example in Pennsylvania Department of General Services Surplus Operations ...


5

Yes, I bring power adapters in my hand luggage all the time without problems.


5

BA "Hand Luggage Only" fares are ones without any checked baggage allowance. You still get all the cabin baggage allowance of a normal ticket, it just means you can't check in a bag (without an extra fee) You can find all the info on the BA Baggage Policy on their website, under Hand Baggage Allowance. You're allowed 1 cabin page, and one personal page. ...


5

I think this is going to vary a lot depending on where you're flying to/from, on which airline, and how recent the latest scare was or new rules were put in place. For instance I always used to travel with in-line skates and I always brought them on as one of my items of hand luggage because their weight might push my checked luggage over the limit or ...


4

There is a mention that there is no weight restriction on the Cabin baggage unless they impose it separately per flight. 20.3.1 passengers are permitted one piece of Cabin Baggage which must comply with the following criteria: • the maximum dimensions of the Cabin Baggage may not be any larger than 56x45x25cm (including wheels, pockets and ...


4

The situation is a little complicated and there a few things you must consider. First of all I'm going to tell you about all the legal prospects of this situation and what can happen if then open up your bags and find two packaged phones inside. Take a look at this great answer already posted here. Now, since these are two packaged phones, despite being ...


4

TL;DR Your bag should be fine to carry based on the picture and the link you posted. The zipper should not be an issue as long as it's easy to open and the material fits inside comfortably. The rules are fairly well defined but vary slightly from place to place. On a general basis, I would recommend carrying a transparent, resealable, plastic bag with a ...


4

The exact size limits for carry-on will depend on the airline, but your sword probably exceeds most airlines'. For example: Qantas's maximum dimension for a piece of carry-on luggage on a domestic flight is 115 cm (about 3' 9") Jetstar's is 56 cm (about 1' 10")


3

Even if it is legal (which I don't know, and would likely depend on both the state you're flying from, the state you're flying to, possibly any state you're making stopovers as well), I'd not put it in my carryon because of the way the TSA is almost guaranteed to overreact. Putting it in your hold luggage is less likely to cause them to go ape, but you still ...


3

I think I found the answer. Most airport has this facility where you can drop-off (store) your carry one and pick it up before flight. There is usually a fee for it. This links is for Heathrow Airport 9 pounds/day This link is for Abu Dhabi Airport 20 durham/day


3

In the USA, the airline will accept purchases made after the security checkpoint because of the liquids rule. You can have liquids 3oz and under in a quart-sized bag at the checkpoint, and purchase larger bottles of liquid (eg, bottled water) after. Security does not enforce an airline's carry-on policy -- that's not their job.


3

It depends on the airline. Jet Blue makes no mention of airport shop items in their carry-on policy, but the United Airlines policy states that "a limited amount of duty-free merchandise or food purchased in the airport" doesn't count against the carry-on limit and the Delta policy doesn't count "food or drink purchased after clearing the security ...


3

Since it's a prescription ointment, it's not subject to the 100 ml / 3.4 fluid ounces rules anyway. Have the prescription label on it and clearly readable, and make sure the name matches the name on your boarding pass and in your passport, and you're fine. (This is more than you technically need because the rules just say "medications" but why give a ...


3

I don't think any airline would allow you to take that sword as carry-on luggage into the cabin with you. However, you should be able to check it in as luggage (but it may be considered oversize luggage, which may be an extra fee). Just be sure to pack it well (you can find info about packing actual swords as luggage online, which may be helpful).


2

I can tell you I have done this many times and have carried over 15kg in my coat that has 7 big pockets. I know this because as I was waiting in the queue in Poznan, there was a free scales (unlike UK airports) and I had an idea to see just exactly how much I had in there. The airline did not bat an eyelid.


2

A recent experience of mine: Manchester to Orlando, FL with Thomas Cook (large aircraft) with a carry-on luggage within the size limits they asked me to put it on the scales and since it was 12kgs (limit was 6kgs) I was forced to check it in (luckily my ticket included a 23kg allowance). The very same carry-on flying from Orlando, FL to Memphis, TN with ...


2

It is not a problem with TSA. Last year, the only suitcase that was opened by the TSA was the one with a small bottle of sand. The airport was San Fransisco The destination was Europe


2

There is no bullet, powder or primer, therefore you are not carrying ammunition. Tapered brass cylinders are not on the prohibited list. Baggage x-ray won't care in the slightest - you can put 20 live 50BMG rounds (and the rifle) in your checked baggage and they won't care (assuming the USA). (If you really check an M-82 they might care a lot, but in the ...


2

The first thing you have to know is that United Break Guitars. I guess the morale of the story is that if you have a large instrument that you want to keep safe during a flight, get another seat for it and strap it in. I can tell you from a lot of reports that I read about smaller things like laptops and camera equipment that if you do not put it into a box ...


2

You could put it into a small cardboard box to prevent damage if you really want to check it. That would prevent it from spearing anything else too. Or wrap it in bubble wrap. Or just shove it inside a shoe etc. But I typically take a back-pack loaded with all kinds of cables and wires onto every flight. They make me take the laptop out, but that leaves ...


2

I've only flown with instruments within the US, not internationally. Checking instruments is allowed, but often involves extra fees for large instruments. That said, the first thing to do is call the airline, and ask their policy. Find out if they routinely allow you to carry it in the cabin (rare), or if you have to check it. And if you check it, do you ...


2

I don't know if the TSA also has weight or mass limits but the 3.4-fluid-ounce rule is a volume limit (more-or-less equivalent to 100 ml). In any case, it would seem that the container needs to be smaller than that, by volume. A mass in grams or even in ounces does not directly indicate that.


2

The prohibition applies to liquids, gels and aerosols. Since you describe the food as squidgy it will with very high probability be considered a gel and not pass. My advice is to take freeze dried camping foods in your hand luggage. Those are entirely dry and pass without any problems (source: I do this all the time).


1

General recommendation from the Musician's Union is to travel with it in the cabin - which may require you buying a second seat ticket. If you can't do this, then ensure you have a robust flight case with sufficient protection - remember if this is your pride and joy, you probably want it to arrive intact. You can typically take out extra insurance on ...


1

I measured the box in BSL and it was 21,2 x 41,2 x 58 cm. However, the 58 cm are not exact because firstly the box has two rounded rods at the bottom, which makes it slightly smaller at these points, but it's open to the top so this dimension won't matter to much I guess.



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