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19

It isn't a weapon, tool, flammable, explosive, chemical or liquid, so I can't imagine that it would be a problem. It isn't listed by the TSA as a prohibited item. I'd say just put it in the bottom of your bag and not worry about it. If you are travelling internationally, you may have an issue with customs depending on your country of origin and destination, ...


18

No. Restricted items may only be carried in checked luggage. However, Singapore Airlines permits you to check at least 30 kg for free, so I would suggest you simply check your carry-on luggage.


18

Knives don't go in carry-on, period. (maybe really small ones, depending on the country.) The material the knife is made of doesn't matter. Ceramic, wood (ebony will hold a nice edge), bone, flint and so on have all made fine weapons millenia before steel. If you do pack a non-metallic weapon in the darker corners of your carry-on, and they find it, you ...


15

If you are talking about a personal mirror like the one ladies carry in their purses, then it's fine. But if you are talking about a large mirror like the ones to be hanged on the wall, then it's a different story. My day-to-day job is about this kind of things. There is nothing clear regarding Glass or Mirrors. For example, Glass bottles are totally fine, ...


14

No, a standard 22" rollaboard suitcase won't fit in a CRJ overhead bin. In my experience, most airlines that fly the CRJ and similarly sized regional aircraft use a "gate check" system: luggage that is of "carry-on size" (i.e. would fit in a larger airliner's bin) but doesn't actually fit in the bin on the aircraft in use will be taken from you at the gate, ...


13

I guess while pens in theory could be used to cause pain, as could some types of shoes or household keys, and they're allowed. I assure you, you'll have zero problem taking an ordinary ballpoint or ink pen (or pencil) on a flight - unless you have some weird pen in the shape of a dagger or something :)


13

When you're making rules like this, simplicity and objectivity are vital. You don't want (whether you're a traveller, a supervisor of the security staff, or a person trying to prevent terrorism) a situation where security staff need to make decisions on their feet based on whether the passenger's story is good enough or any other kind of judgement call. Hmm, ...


13

Most major airlines are fairly lax regarding the weight of carry-on bags - even when they do officially publish a limit. Unfortunately for you, AirNZ is an exception. Both Air NZ themselves, as well as the major airports in New Zealand, do frequently check carry-on bags and if they are over 7Kg you will be forced to check them. If your bag looks light ...


12

According to Delta's Baggage page you can check the child seat at curbside and doesn't count as standard baggage allowance. For JetBlue it's the same thing. If the child doesn't fly with you it will count as baggage allowance in a standard way. They definitely won't let you bring it aboard the aircraft but they may not even let you bring it through ...


12

Internationally is a problem for soil, but not domestic. You shouldn't have an issue with TSA at all.


12

Here's what customs rules in India state (the 'free allowance' referred to is for personal items, and the duty-free allowance of alcohol cigarettes): One laptop computer (notebook computer) over and above the said free allowances mentioned above is also allowed duty free if imported by any passenger of the age of 18 years and above. So obviously, ...


11

"Normal" airlines are fairly lax on the baggage requirements. If your checked baggage is a little bit over (say 1 kg or so) or slightly bigger than usual, nobody's going to make a fuss about it. Same goes for hand luggage -- they are almost never going to check its size or weight (although restrictions do exist, 8kg per bag IIRC) if it looks okay. You might ...


11

Yes you can take your video games CDs safely through airport scanners. Airport scanners (either X-ray scanners or magnetic field scanners) won't damage CDs or DVDs by any means. Both CDs and DVDs are optical storage media and X-Rays do not interfere with them...


11

I believe "standard" tubes of toothpaste are about 6 ounces or more. This would not be allowed within the US as TSA regulations limit liquids and gels to containers of at most 3.4 oz (100 ml). Larger containers which are partially empty are specifically forbidden. See http://www.tsa.gov/311/311-carry-ons.shtm.


11

If you do take it and store it in the hold, I'd suggest removing the harddrive. You don't want that bashed around by other suitcases. Taking it as carry-on - as long as it fits in their luggage dimensions (the airline you're using will have this on their website) and is under their weight restrictions (you sure it weighs less than 8kg?), then there's no ...


11

The problem isn't the Thermometer bit, it's the mercury bit. Mercury and Aluminium really don't play well together. Well, depending on your point of view, you might say they play excellently together, but the outcome is you destroy the structure and strength of your aluminium. The problem with this is that much of the plane (including the fuselage) is made ...


10

It probably depends on how your cheese grater is constructed. You can see the official list of prohibited items on the TSA web site. The most relevant section seems to be the "sharp objects" section, which lists: Box Cutters Ice Axes/Ice Picks Knives - except for plastic or round bladed butter knives Meat Cleavers Razor-Type blades - such as ...


10

I believe what you're looking for is called the Knifeless Leatherman. 8 in | 19 cm Ruler Bottle Opener Can Opener Hard-wire Cutters Large Screwdriver Needlenose Pliers Phillips Screwdriver Regular Pliers Scissors Small Screwdriver Wire Cutters Wire Stripper but importantly, NO KNIVES!


10

Whether your cabin baggage gets weighed really depends on what airport and what airline you are flying with. With most full-service airlines, they don't bother weighing baggage as long as it meets the size restrictions - and sometimes they don't even check that. The bit about size restrictions is because at some airports, at a security counter itself they ...


10

As you're going from Terminal 5 to Terminal 1 you will need to re-clear security, and your duty free liquids will not be allowed through regardless of how they are packaged. Normally the solution to this would be to put the duty free in your checked luggage after clearing customs, but given that you're on a "pre-cleared" flight you are correct in that your ...


9

Out of first hand experience with this as a previous cabin crew, sometimes the cabin crew of a flight signal the ground agents about the overhead compartments being full in the middle of the boarding process, so to avoid possible delays if removing excess hand luggage from the cabin is needed, the ground agents will prohibit cabin luggage for the remaining ...


8

Unless your power supply is DC (i.e. you will only be plugging into an airplane, auto, or marine DC socket), there is no escaping the brick, which contains a transformer for reducing voltage and converting current from the wall into something the laptop can use. As it operates based on its physical properties (e.g. size of core, number of coils), reducing ...


8

While I was going to add this as a comment, I think it's more suitable as what SHOULD be the answer. While it may be fun to do, environmentally you really shouldn't do it. In addition to potential disease transfers, bugs or contamination, if everyone did this, think how it'd affect the beach! You're essentially doing what would take erosion a lot longer ...


7

According to the TSA's "Can I Bring..." web site (also available on their Mobile App) you CAN bring your Cheese Grater in either Carry-on or checked-in luggage. Search Results For: cheese grater Check or Carry-on You may transport this item in carry-on baggage or in checked baggage. For items you wish to carry-on, you should check with the ...


7

You can expect to be able to bring up to 1 liter onto a plane, in vessels of up to 100ml, carried in a transparent bag. Expect to lose any container over 100ml.


7

What they may be referring to is that most countries these days require you to separate your laptop from your carry-on - that is, to take it out of the bag. Evidently this helps them check it more thoroughly than having it inside lots of other stuff - quite often other electronics. I've had this happen on every flight for the last few years, and it's ...


7

In any case, if it is not framed, I would consider rolling it up and putting it into a cardboard picture tube. There are some with a fairly large diameter. Most universities send out the diplomas in such tubes anyhow. Otherwise, get 1 envelope, 2 layers of hard cardboard, and a larger envelope, best a padded one. You put the diploma into the envelope. Then ...


7

The rules regarding carry-on or hand luggage are clear enough when it comes to items that are obviously dangerous, like knives, guns, explosives or other obviously dangerous items. The problem is Civil Aviation Authorities and airlines can not make a list of all possible dangerous items because there are new items almost everyday. To overcome this dilemma, ...


6

I have flown with Ryanair many times (never EasyJet, so I don't know them). Ryanair are very strict with counting the number of hand luggage bags. You can only have 1 and that includes handbags or camera bags. In some airports they are strict with the size aswell, and will request that you put your bag into the little 'size box' thing at the gate before you ...


6

For traveling from or within the United States, foods that are in and of themselves in the form of a liquid or gel are not permitted, but those which may simply contain liquids or gels are permitted. Unfortunately your mileage may vary depending on the interpretation of the screeners. You will find some, mostly older, anecdotes of jelly doughnuts or ...



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