Hot answers tagged

133

"My bag has medication in which I may need during the flight" would normally be sufficient to get the cabin crew to select a different bag. You bag is more important than other people's.


70

Maybe not exactly the answer to your question, but according to this site (see Section XIV, Chapter 71, HS code 7108131000), Russia imposes a 20% customs duty on the importation of gold bars. So unless you have 5.3 million rubles on hand to pay the customs duty (or can break off a fifth of the bar), expect the customs officers to hold on to your gold bar ...


66

It happened to me once in London Heathrow. In my case I didn't have any emotional attachment to the item and it only cost around £3 to replace, so I threw it away, however I discussed with the security and the airline what my options were. They offered me the following options: Throw it away (I actually ended up doing just that) Post it to whatever ...


59

It's allowed, I have personally seen a passenger who booked a seat for a bag. I then asked the passenger and he said it was gold. I was an operating flight attendant. I also do not recall any rules regarding prohibiting gold onboard, (from an aviation point of view) unless it was in the shape of a knife I assume. Just check with the airline you are flying ...


45

Outside of an emergency evacuation or similarly dire situation, I cannot think of any reason why a civil authority would ban a person from purchasing multiple seats. After all, it is not uncommon for people to purchase an additional seat to carry items like musical instruments or pets, or because they do not fit into a single seat. In consideration of this, ...


38

If your handheld bag is small enough to go under the seat in front of you, it won't be taken from you. If you want to bring a large roll-a-bord to save checking a bag, you can do that, but keep the things you genuinely need during the flight in a separate smaller bag. Also, do not choose a seat, such as the first seat in economy, that doesn't have a "seat in ...


35

In the US, according to the TSA you have some options: When prohibited items come through the checkpoint, passengers are given options: Take the item to the ticket counter and check it in your baggage or a box provided by the airport. Many airports have a US Postal Service or other shipping services area where boxes, stamps and envelopes can ...


32

I am a software engineer and I also test the software on many different smartphones and tablets. I fly frequently within Europe, so my answer will be limited to this area. However, this is also from west to east and east to west, outside of the Schengen region! As a Dutch citizen, I rarely need a visa to travel, which makes this easy. I do carry a lot of ...


29

Anecdotally, you can buy gold at a vending machine in Abu Dhabi airport, in the outgoing terminal. Whilst policies at destinations will vary of course, it's highly unlikely to be widely illegal whilst being sold at an airport. Gold ATMs are available across the world - not sure I would have believed it if I hadn't seen it myself while transiting through Abu ...


25

I frequently fly all over Europe with shoe-box PC's or various measuring devices in carry on luggage. The measuring equipment is very expensive: € 250.000 is pretty normal for a single device. You don't want to let it out of your sight or risk a baggage-handler to throw a suitcase around. And they don't like temperature fluctuations much (calibration ...


24

Nutella is pretty similar to toothpaste in terms of viscosity. Since toothpaste counts as a liquid (source: http://ec.europa.eu/transport/modes/air/security/aviation-security-policy/lags_en.htm), it is reasonably safe to assume that Nutella does so as well. Also, this page lists "pastes, jams and jellies" as liquids. The latter page is for British Airways ...


24

Here's my take (please take with a grain of salt, it's based on general travel knowledge and not on any specific experiences like this): People travel with unusual equipment all the time. There's all kinds of scientific, industrial, professional audio, professional photography, etc. equipment, people do try and take all this expensive equipment in hand ...


23

You could wear a fanny pack (a.k.a. hip pack) and keep your meds in that. Then you wouldn't even need to put it under the seat in front of you - it'd just be around your waist the whole time. Image:


22

It isn't a weapon, tool, flammable, explosive, chemical or liquid, so I can't imagine that it would be a problem. It isn't listed by the TSA as a prohibited item. I'd say just put it in the bottom of your bag and not worry about it. If you are travelling internationally, you may have an issue with customs depending on your country of origin and destination, ...


22

Books are heavier, period. Your typical cheap-ass perfect-bound B&W 300-page airport paperback detective/romance novel weighs around 441 grams. A nice hardback or a big chunky guidebook will be more: Lonely Planet India is over 1 kg, and a 500-page ream of A4 printing paper is well over 2 kg! A T-shirt occupies roughly the same volume as that ...


21

Here's what customs rules in India state (the 'free allowance' referred to is for personal items, and the duty-free allowance of alcohol cigarettes): One laptop computer (notebook computer) over and above the said free allowances mentioned above is also allowed duty free if imported by any passenger of the age of 18 years and above. So obviously, ...


20

The problem isn't the Thermometer bit, it's the mercury bit. Mercury and Aluminium really don't play well together. Well, depending on your point of view, you might say they play excellently together, but the outcome is you destroy the structure and strength of your aluminium. The problem with this is that much of the plane (including the fuselage) is made ...


20

No. Restricted items may only be carried in checked luggage. However, Singapore Airlines permits you to check at least 30 kg for free, so I would suggest you simply check your carry-on luggage.


20

The rules about knives through airport security vary from country to country. Generally, they all include "a blade over x cm in length". While x may vary, your blade looks to be at most 4 cm or 1.5". So if the rule is a blade over 5cm/2" is not allowed, you'll be fine. I think that is the rule most places, and there was talk of raising it to 7cm in the US ...


19

Knives don't go in carry-on, period. (maybe really small ones, depending on the country.) The material the knife is made of doesn't matter. Ceramic, wood (ebony will hold a nice edge), bone, flint and so on have all made fine weapons millenia before steel. If you do pack a non-metallic weapon in the darker corners of your carry-on, and they find it, you ...


19

I've had two battery packs / power banks, and travelled to several countries with several airlines, taking them as carry on, without any problem...until... Last year, I flew from Tokyo Haneda, via Beijing, China to Vancouver, Canada. In Beijing, Chinese officials sent me to a security point, where several people including myself had our power banks taken ...


19

You are carrying a half-million dollars in gold on your person and you are flying into... Russia? Keep a sharp eye out. As Nate points out, you may have to pay an import duty in Russia, but apparently there are no restrictions on the British end. In the US, you would have to declare it. Last year, I got into a nasty run-in with ICE who were convinced I ...


19

I've travelled from the UK to many European computer/hacker festivals over the last 10 years or so, often taking strange devices similar to yours (homebrew machines, Raspberry Pi boards, 80s retro computers...) through airport and Eurostar security - and I'd say that about 80% of the time it attracts no attention at all - it just goes through the X-ray with ...


19

This option is probably not available everywhere (but it's available in terminals 2, 3, 4 and 5 at Heathrow), it only works if you'll be back to the same airport at some point, and the cost may be a tad high if you'll be away for while (but probably cheaper than the fees for an extra checked bag): just leave the item as left luggage! The company managing ...


18

When you're making rules like this, simplicity and objectivity are vital. You don't want (whether you're a traveller, a supervisor of the security staff, or a person trying to prevent terrorism) a situation where security staff need to make decisions on their feet based on whether the passenger's story is good enough or any other kind of judgement call. Hmm, ...


17

Yes, and there are great articles online detailing travelling with condoms. They're not liquids, flammable or on any of the TSA unapproved lists, so you're totally fine to take them. However, remember they're meant to be stored at room temperature as they are still medical devices you don't want to take risks with damaging them. Don't store them with sharp ...


17

According to IATA Dangerous Good regulations, torches are not allowed in carry-on or checked in baggage, nor filled with gas, nor empty, even if unused. I've heard some airports in EU do allow such items on board, but I've never seen any hard evidence of such cases happening. Source: Experience, IATA DGR


17

There are three concerns: 1) terrorism; 2) export/import limitations; and 3) the fire hazard from the lithium contained in the cell phone and laptop batteries. Terrorism: the difficulty of addressing terrorism is that the level of screening and scrutiny is often arbitrary depending on the current political climate and the capriciousness of the security ...


17

Something like this happened to me some years ago. I was flying from Sydney, Australia to Bali, Indonesia with China Airways - I think!? There was a final hand-luggage check at the departure gate. I was "randomly" picked and my bag was checked. Unfortunately, I'd completely forgotten that my Leatherman Wave was in my hand luggage! Apart from the initial ...


16

If you are talking about a personal mirror like the one ladies carry in their purses, then it's fine. But if you are talking about a large mirror like the ones to be hanged on the wall, then it's a different story. My day-to-day job is about this kind of things. There is nothing clear regarding Glass or Mirrors. For example, Glass bottles are totally fine, ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible