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10

I spent 47 days in Guatemala in 2009 as a backpacker and I did not have any problems even while taking local buses in Guatemala City and walking around there quite a bit. However I did hear from tourists who were victims of petty crime and you also see 'security guards' with machine guns all over the place. Usually next to banks and more expensive shops. I ...


6

First, in general, if you take a shore excursion from the ship then you are protected against getting back late. The ship will wait for you. If you take an independent excursion, the ship will leave without you, you are subject to fines, and it is your problem as to how to get to the next port to rejoin the ship. I have experienced first hand an excursion ...


6

It's definitely safe, even with kids. With some basic street smart you should be fine. Ignore people that come up to you on the street and offer tours and only get them from places in established buildings. There are guards with big guns in some places but those are more for show than anything. If you do get robbed it will most likely be a pickpocket and not ...


6

As a backpacker, I'd say it's possible to travel safely in most countries. Sure at present, Yemen and Syria may not be ideal, but otherwise you're pretty good. First step is to look up your government's travel advisories for the country. For example, New Zealand does one for us for any region in the world. Take it with a grain of salt, however - remember ...


6

I cross-posted your question here. According to the forum's moderator, there is a well-connected Spanish teacher named Ramon who can probably help you. Looks like you can find his contact info here: http://www.sanpedrospanishschool.org/pages/contacts.html


5

Spanish citizen do not require a visa to enter Guatemala for 90 days. I would therefore in general advise her to use the Spanish passport since there will be no questions at immigration. She can then have her Guatemalan passport renewed, once inside the country. If the immigration officer sees the expired passport, there is a chance that he will let her go ...


5

The Pan American Highway is probably the most popular route. Mexico and possibly other countries require insurance from an underwriter in that country. It will probably be a lot cheaper to arrange that before the trip. It would be worth checking to see if it is unsafe to travel in certain areas, and at night. In Nicaragua, for example, there have been ...


4

So, you've actually ended up asking multiple questions in one which strictly ([faq]) you shouldn't do, but I'll try to address it as one. In relation to getting there in time for your flight, it depends on the airline you take, what they say, and also how much lee-way you want to give your arrival at the airport. However, yes, you can take ground ...


3

Since the reshuffles of 2012, many of the terminals have changed around and companies have moved. So be sure that you're going to the right place. However, it sounds like you know the details, so assume it IS in Zona 1, which Wikitravel seems to agree with, you may consider this advice from Frommers: Guatemala City is not very conducive to exploring by ...


3

Bear in mind that it is winter season in Central America (until late October). And while staying in the Pan American highway is probably your best bet, there's still chance for roadblocks caused by mudslides, collapsed bridges, etc. Road infrastructure on those countries isn't exactly at the same levels you are used to.


2

Not familiar with specifics laws of Guatemala, but in general: You can usually enter your country of citizenship on any ID conclusively proving that citizenship (with varying degrees of hassle). An expired passport should suffice. However, she'd almost certainly need to obtain a new Guatemalan passport in order to leave (i.e. could not use the Spanish one ...



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