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17

When you meet them. You may well get "reverse omiyage" from your friend when you're leaving, though!


17

Being Chinese, I thought this was a rather interesting question. I personally have not heard of such a taboo, but since there are regional variants on bad Chinese gifts, this might vary with area, and is certainly not authoritative. Due to this, unless some academic publishes a research paper on the topic of Chinese taboos with properly cited information, ...


8

The holy trinity of Chinese gifting is liquor, cigarettes and local delicacies. In the $15-20 bracket you're presumably not looking to bribe anybody, so a nice bottle of California wine might fit the bill, although they're fragile and a pain to transport due to liquid restrictions. For local delicacies, things like chocolate or candy are pretty safe, and ...


7

Regardless of where you're going, local specialities are always good: the kind of thing you'd have trouble finding even elsewhere in the US. Some ideas: cookies, especially the giant, (pseudo-)handmade, chewy kinds like Pepperidge Farm candy, eg. Reese's Pieces and other peanut-buttery things rarely seen outside the US liquor, eg. whiskey or Californian ...


5

Two possible sources here, one with brevity, one with detail. The Taxation and Customs Union page specifies: Up to a value of €430 for air and sea travellers Up to value of €300 for other travellers The value on an individual item may not be split up. but doesn't really explain how they define it. So the UK government has a page on Electronic ...


5

Assuming that the question is about items bought in the US and then brought to Europe (not 100% clear from the question title), the rules can be found here. Note that whether stuff is boxed, new, etc. or not does nor make a difference in general - it may make a difference for determining the value of the goods, though (new vs. used). An almost-new product ...


5

Mark and DCTLib already posted a link to official EU guidance on this (+1 to them) but it might be useful to clarify how these rules are intended to work. Firstly, there is a fundamental difference between goods that have never been imported in the EU and things you take with you out of the EU and want to bring back in but that were originally bought in the ...


4

India is a very religious country, so the couple's religion can matter. If they are in different religions, do it in favor of whose side you are visiting for. It is accepted if you leave cash in an envelope for the couple. Observe others to see whether they write the names in it or not, and follow. Usually, there are envelopes available on-site. I can't ...


4

Turns out you can bring any amount of fudge you wish to in the UK, as long as it is for personal use (i.e. not for resale). Fudge should be a confectionery, and according to UK customs rules confectioneries are exempt from import restrictions: Exempted food products The following products are exempted from the rules: [...] chocolate ...


3

Definitely arrive with a gift from your home country. Edibles and tea or coffee are common gifts and widely appreciated.


2

It depends on your friend, but I prefer useful gifts, specially before a long trip where any extra weight might be a problem. Does your friend have all the gear he'll need for the trip? I found this question on Bicycles SE about gear for a long bike trip. You could check if he's got all the needed resources and give him any he might have forgotten. Another ...


2

I wouldn't worry about it. There are two basic kinds of traditional Chinese teapots: clay and metal. Clay teapots may indeed well use lead in the glazing, but the glazing is always on the outside of the pot, and will not thus come into contact with the tea. But if this isn't enough for you, just buy a simple, unglazed teapot. Metal teapots, at least the ...


2

I haven't traveled to China, but I have traveled extensively through Thailand, India, Indonesia, Pakistan and Nepal. In my experience, the locals really appreciate small American-made things like chocolates and candy. A bag of Hershey's kisses made me the favorite person among all the kids when I was visiting a friend in India. Key here is to buy something ...


2

Going to answer this part: "Will it be safe to bring them without risk of paying tax?" Yes it will. Make sure your items are not boxed and wrapped in paper. Unless it looks like your going to sell it, the airport personal will not be bothered.


1

It doesn't have to be anything elaborate, but something typically American will be appreciated. If you are from a rural region, some local products will be nice, otherwise just get something from a souvenir shop at the airport before you leave, and don't worry about the kitsch. If you want to make it personal, add a box of your favourite candy. (Candy is ...



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