Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

The one he is probably referring to was actually presented by Venezuela - The Equestrian Monument of Simon Bolivar, liberator of Bolivia, Panama, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela from Spanish rule. This statue is at the entrance to Central Park at the north end of Sixth Avenue - The Avenue Of The Americas - so it fits the context of the story well. ...


10

I've stayed in a lot of homestays around the world, and in my experience the best thing to give is something local (to you) and edible. Being a Brit, this usually results in local hand-made fudge. Usually people who provide homestays will receive a good many guests so trinkets are not so good - they just accumulate as clutter. Confectionary is a safe bet, ...


9

You probably already noticed that Swedes love them candles, so a small candle holder might be a good idea. Here's a very typical Swedish design: These things run around 100-130 SEK (12-15 EUR) a pop -- not quite in your price range, but close. These are not very fragile and they'd stuff it with paper for you, so it's quite durable. If you want something ...


8

Pepparkakor! Try to find a brand that is not in every Ikea store, though:


8

You're not going to "offend" anybody by giving them an unwrapped gift, but careful packaging will definitely increase the gift's perceived value and the brownie points you get for giving it, and yes, this extends to "just" snacks. Quick primer: http://www.korea4expats.com/article-gift-giving.html If you're staying in a hotel, reception can probably wrap ...


8

I just asked my host here in Kathmandu and without hesitation he replied... CHOCOLATE! Not the local stuff but nice imported chocolate. Apparently it's a big hit.


6

The holy trinity of Chinese gifting is liquor, cigarettes and local delicacies. In the $15-20 bracket you're presumably not looking to bribe anybody, so a nice bottle of California wine might fit the bill, although they're fragile and a pain to transport due to liquid restrictions. For local delicacies, things like chocolate or candy are pretty safe, and ...


6

I used to travel a lot I would say that you can also take: some handmade laces from Koniakow, what is a world known place with the tradition of over 200 years of lace making handmade christmas or eastern decorations made of straw - very light :D another option for you would be some amber. All thoses products you can find in "CEPELIA" in the shops ...


5

If you want something different, Polish and light, it would be worth having a look at Polish paper cutting. A bunch of those will not weigh much and should definitely be a souvenir uniquely from Poland.


5

Regardless of where you're going, local specialities are always good: the kind of thing you'd have trouble finding even elsewhere in the US. Some ideas: cookies, especially the giant, (pseudo-)handmade, chewy kinds like Pepperidge Farm candy, eg. Reese's Pieces and other peanut-buttery things rarely seen outside the US liquor, eg. whiskey or Californian ...


5

You need these three elements: Durable, something stays forever, not something edible like candy. Cheap Leaves a strong impression, Something that will definitely reminds people of you. I suggest the following: small Souvenirs, A landmark of your home country for example or the magnetic souvenirs to be put on the fridge or even Pens with something that ...


5

You probably already took your trip, but for the benefit of others who may come along here are some addtions: For drinkers: Some variety of punsch, of which the Carlhamn's Flaggpunsch is probably the most common and recognizable variety. Can't miss its yellow color. A far more intriguing gift than Swedish vodka, which is easily found everywhere. Legendary ...


5

The gift that to me would be most expressive of Sweden is the delahast, the little horse figurine. The advantage is that it's not edible, which is say that it is "durable." Here are some being made, the photo is from Wikipedia:


4

The first that comes to mind are the amazing ciders made in Sweden. The problem with liquor in general, is the weight of the bottles. The same could be said for the amazing Swedish jams. You would make me happy with something food related. Things like dried fruit, candy, dried sausages, or knackebrod comes to mind. Unfortunately for you, lakerol candy is ...


4

I think the best way is to give every member of family something interesting depends on their age; toys for kids, electronic devices for young members and something local and edible for parents.


2

For my India trip I brought: A couple of souvenirs from my city - licitar heart 12 small glass bottles with Croatian national drink nicely packaged in Croatian national colors 6 small jars of Croatian honey Everyone was very happy with these gifts. Of course, have labels on bottles and jars with you country's colors or something so that it doesn't look ...


2

I wouldn't worry about it. There are two basic kinds of traditional Chinese teapots: clay and metal. Clay teapots may indeed well use lead in the glazing, but the glazing is always on the outside of the pot, and will not thus come into contact with the tea. But if this isn't enough for you, just buy a simple, unglazed teapot. Metal teapots, at least the ...


2

I haven't traveled to China, but I have traveled extensively through Thailand, India, Indonesia, Pakistan and Nepal. In my experience, the locals really appreciate small American-made things like chocolates and candy. A bag of Hershey's kisses made me the favorite person among all the kids when I was visiting a friend in India. Key here is to buy something ...


1

I think you can gift them imported perfumes/deos (if you have any) or Socks (for a nice long memory),


1

This depends on multiple factors but mainly: Your age How long you have stayed abroad Where you are coming back from Having said that, the rules are quite clear. Here is a quick .pdf guide that will tell you the maximum worth of goods you are bringing in to the country. If you want more detailed documentation, check out this rule sheet. If you are ...


1

Personally I always travel with a bag of Clip-on Koalas! These make a great gift to give out along the way as they are both a great representation of my home country, as well as being suitably "cute" - plus they are cheap enough to be able to give out without concerns for the cost. Recently I've even started leaving them in hotel rooms when I checkout ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible