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Yes you can, just say you wanna pitstop/go through the city "odense". It's the "central" city of the island in the middle "fyn". There is only one paid bridge from "Fyn/odense" to "sjælland/københavn". It costs approx. 67€


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Most people didn't think to click OPTIONS and select Avoid Ferries. The route you are asking about would appear instantly if you do this. Note that on this route there is a €34 one way toll for crossing the Storebælt bridge. (There are also return tolls for evenings, weekends and bank holidays.) This route is also about 140km longer than the route using the ...


0

No you will not be allowed to board your flight to Germany. You need to have a valid visa in the country you are boarding from. In case you are not allowed entry into the Schengen, you will be deported to the place your flight originated from. Hence even if you have a valid docs for Germany and India, you will not be allowed to travel to Germany.


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If you would fly to Venice, then most of Germany is within range. The Rhine. Berlin. The North Sea coast. You can reach the Alps. Hike up mountains in view of the really steep peaks. Rothenburg, but depending on the season you might meet many other tourists. (Attention, there are several towns with this name.) Neuschwanstein. You might also look for a ...


1

You can appeal, but your appeal may not result in an issuance considering the reason given goes towards either: Documents your provided. Your interview. It will be quicker, and easier, for you to apply again and this time address the specific concern that was listed as the reason for refusal. In your case, you need demonstrate that you will return at ...


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It is unlikely, that a reentry ban has been imposed on you, but to make sure, you have the right to apply for a release of information from the German Central Register of Aliens. The application is free of charge, but you need a notarized confirmation of your signature. Obtaining a residence permit as a father of a German child should be a formality. At ...


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Exit and re-entry at the German border is no problem, as long as the passport is still valid (even on the last day). Note that you need a valid passport at all time while being inside Germany. A minimum validity is not required (§ 3 Abs. 1 AufenthG). Please note that you are not allowed to enter other Schengen member states, which would require a passport ...


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You should not need an airport transit visa from Germany for this itinerary. The German mission in the US explicitly says that you are exempt from the airport transit visa requirement if: If they return from the USA after having used the visa Further, Timatic, the system which airlines will check to determine if your documents are in order, ...


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In Germany, and many other European countries except for the UK, Maestro is the de facto card-payment method. Many shops do not accept credit cards and if they do, Visa and MasterCard are more widely accepted than AmEx. Now, that does not mean you'll have to pay cash everywhere. Recently (somewhere in 2015) more shops started accepting credit cards. This ...


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This question is from 2011 and things have improved, even in Germany. As of 2016 you can survive using credit card payments only, but there are still plenty of places that do not accept them. As a rule of thumb a credit card is more likely to be accepted if you are in a metropolitan/touristy area with hotel/supermarket/... chains for larger sums of money ...


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I have never had trouble with using a USA swipe credit card in any ATM machine in Europe.


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A core reason is that shops don't like to accept them, so much that they sometimes even 'fake' that they fail (even disconnect the machine and claim it won't work); or give a discount for higher priced articles when asked. The fees to them are high (as in other countries), but in Germany specially, the EC card (just like a debit card) has taken over the ...


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This is not a new rule. It is expressed in article 6 of the Schengen visa code. If you have a justification for applying outside your country of residence, the consulate can consider the application. The justification has to be significant, though. For example if you left Australia not planning to travel to Europe and then changed your plans, you would ...


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On a recent trip to Germany (Berlin) (December 2015), my Mastercard Debit card (Chip + Pin) was accepted in all large stores (Karstadt, Ullrich, Kaufland), as well as the BVG Mobile App, but notably not in the U-Bahn ticket machines (per https://www.bvg.de/en/Tickets/Other-ways-to-buy/At-ticket-machines, payment is accepted only in cash or with EC card). ...


4

Lots of people are reluctant to disclose something in their past that might affect a visa application. Some of the strategies they may opt for are... Available Strategies Full disclosure with a strong mitigating excuse. This is the safest strategy because there is no Sword of Damocles to contend with going forward. This strategy maximises your control ...


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Regarding the last part of the question: Gun ownership requires a permit. The most common of those allows the owner to carry an unloaded gun in a locked case to and from a licensed shooting range. When not training, the gun must be kept in a safe. It is possible for tourists to bring a gun for hunting or sporting use. This requires a permit as well, like ...



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