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0

There is a specific kind of registration (and insurance) in Germany for vehicles that will leave the country soon; you get a specific registration tag ('Zollkennzeichen'), with the last date allowed in the country on it. Basically, you buy normal insurance (like everyone in Germany would need), for pretty much the normal price, and it ends the day you want ...


3

Hertz lists cars that need to be returned to the origin country, and if you rent one of those they waive the one way fee. The website listing such deals for europe is http://www.hertz-transfer.eu/. I imagine a couple of companies might have a similar listing available.


1

Yes, there is no reason why it would not be possible. However on the form, there is a specific field to list the visas delivered during the last 3 years (field 26?). Just list your multiple entry visa there: validity date from... to... The application form is here:Schengen Visa Application Form. They explicitely expect that people would have already got ...


1

Usually you'll just be asked where you're coming from, how Long you'll be staying in Schengen for, and possibly for what purpose. Depends on who you get on that day though - as an EU ID Card holder I have no personal experience (but often overhear non-EU nationals being checked). As suggested above, you Need a visa for Schengen, which, for border purposes, ...


2

Since you're traveling with a passport from the Philippines, you'll need a visa before you can travel (note the warning on that page about longer waiting times for appointments right now). You'll need to complete the forms and carefully follow their checklist to ensure that you've supplied all the required documents, and make an appointment to submit them to ...


8

I got a single entry tourist Schengen visa to Germany. However, my travel plans have changed since then, because my friends are going to Italy instead. I don't have time to apply for a visa to Italy, but I have been told that I can use my Schengen visa to enter Italy. Is that true? This is true. A single entry into the zone occurs when a person ...


4

Your Netherlands residence permit allows short visits to other Schengen states, including but not limited to transit. For a year of studies in Germany, you will need a German D permit. You should apply for it in advance, not just on arrival, even if the Dutch D permit would allow you to enter Germany. The processing might take some time. But questions ...


2

The 180 day calculation is on the basis of a sliding window. First, ignore any days when you were in Germany on your German residence permit. Then, for each day you're in the Schengen area, look at the 179 preceding days. If you were in the Schengen area for more than 89 of those days, you've been in the Schengen area too long. Therefore, assuming your ...


3

Immigration happens in Munich (i.e. where you are first arriving in the Schengen area). Two hours should be enough time to pass through immigration and change planes. If both of your flights are on one booking in fact Lufthansa will get you on a later flight to Dusseldorf in case of delays and deems that time enough since they were willing to sell you this ...


1

There is a good collection of sites, however be aware that these are mostly in German, so Google translate might be useful. Here are some examples but there's more. At least travel-dealz is somewhat transparent about their sources so check where they get their inspiration from and follow these as well. Also they typically publish vacation/hotel deals as well ...


3

A residence permit does not make you a citizen, and other countries visa requirements are almost universally based on the citizenship of the traveler. So you need to apply for the same visas that everyone else with your nationality do -- except for very few and unsystematic exceptions. The Schengen rule that a residence permit from one member implicitly ...


2

You asked a general question, and the very general answer is that you have to apply as a citizen of your nation, but you will mention the residency in Germany. The German residence permit may help to get the visa, but you still need one. There is a short list of countries that will allow entry to people with a Schengen visa without being part of the ...


4

Can be done but it's not clear if it's worth it. I would get a rental car: it's more cost efficient for 4 people, offers a lot of flexibility and you can drive on the Autobahn Drive Friday night from Düsseldorf to a larger town close to the Schwarzwald. Karlsruhe or Baden Baden perhaps. Stay the night at a regular hotel. Check Travelocity for options. ...


-1

Have you considered simply going directly to Munich and spending the whole weekend there? It's a fantastic city. Just take the train to Munich, no need to rent a car, and enjoy the city. Be sure to choose (any) hotel in the old town, or you miss the whole point. If you do for some reason want to see "the Black Forest" you realistically need a car. (It's an ...


4

Chillon Castle, located on a rock on the banks of Lake of Geneva near Montreux. Kyburg Castle, located between Zurich and Winterthur very close to A1. Both places are kinds friendly and very close to your route.


17

For most purposes, German train tickets have three price categories: local and regional trains (branded S, RB or RE), 'regular' long-distance trains (IC or EC) and 'express' long-distance trains (ICE). Your ticket is only valid for transport in the cheapest train categories (S, RB or RE). The easiest option to find only these trains in the DB route planner ...


11

"Supplementary charge" might not be the best way to put it but the text as a whole is reasonably clear. Basically, that ticket (like many other tickets in Germany) is not valid on long-distance trains. On the DB timetable search results, you can find out whether a train is a long-distance train by looking at the "Products" column. All ICE and IC trains are ...


2

My experience in Munich included many conversations like this: Me: "Ja, ein großes weißwurst und ein schwarzes Bier, bitte." Wurstmeister: "Would you like mustard and relish on your sausage?" My German friends (all of whom speak better English than some of my Canadian friends) are of the opinion that if the person has tried to learn even a little bit of ...


11

You asked for German sentences. In case you are not confident in your German pronunciation I would rather go for few but well practised phrases than many sentences: Your most important sentence next to "Hallo" and "danke" should be "Sprechen Sie Englisch?" As others already have said, a lot of people speak good English in Germany - especially in large ...


36

Not very severe. In Munich as with most of Germany, automated transport ticket machines can be changed easily to a number of different languages. Physical German signs are mostly in German but their alphabet is very similar to English so can be easily memorised when you need to know certain place names. However, Munich is a very walkable city which I would ...


15

You'll be fine. Especially young people or people in tourism-related jobs speak good English. Public transport is well-organized and easy to navigate. It might help you to plan your trips and tickets ahead of time (i.e. where you are changing subway lines and what ticket you need - they have a rather complicated zones system so you might just want to get a ...


4

@Aganju's answer is spot but here is another more generic tip: Use viamichelin.com or mappy (as suggested by @Olielo). They do not seem better or worse than Google Maps to find a route, but they also provide an estimate of the tolls that seems pretty accurate (roughly matches my experience, even if I haven't done any systematic comparison). When looking at ...


5

Anything not going through Switzerland will be much cheaper. Switzerland sells annual toll tickets ('Märkli') only, which for a single trip easily beats any other toll. Each countries' toll road agencies will have websites where you can calculate the expected amounts. Note that in some countries, different toll roads are handled by different agencies.


1

It seems that you have a document according to § 81 Abs. 4 AufenthG (Fortgeltungsfiktion) If a foreigner applies for an extension of his or her residence title or for a different residence title before his or her current residence title expires, the current residence title shall be deemed to remain in force from the time of its expiry until the time of ...


2

Easiest option is to fly from Gdansk Airport to Frankfurt Hahn Airport for ~10 EUR on Wizzair: From Frankfurt Hahn Airport you can get to Frankfurt itself by taking a bus for 15 EUR. Total trip cost: 25 EUR. Total trip time: around 6 hours.


3

For buses inside Germany, and not only, check Meinferbus/Flixbus (unfortunately they don't have routes to Poland cities (yet)). For example, from Berlin to Frankfurt am Main the price would be 22 Euro. So, Option 1: Szczecin-Berlin ; Berling - Frankfurt by Meinferbus/Flixbus. Another option (much better I think), there are very cheap flights from Warsaw ...


3

Always try the rome2rio.com website. They provide a very good overview of options and prices, anywhere in the world.


6

I see this trip on blablacar for 20-ish EUR. If you are OK with a car share I can't see how you could possibly get there cheaper.



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