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58

Oktoberfest is a major international tourist festival in a modern, progressive country. No one will question your attendance, no matter how you look. The only reason it would be awkward is if you told everyone that you didn't like German beer! [The only suggestion of racism I could find was where an Asian customer was asked to move from a table at ...


48

Provided there were no other sign or rule forbidding it, turning was perfectly fine. The red X cross on blue background means it's forbidden to stop (absolutes Halteverbot). It's somewhat similar to the more well-known “no parking” sign, but stricter (parking is defined as leaving your vehicle or letting it stand longer than three minutes whereas this signs ...


30

Munich local here. We welcome everyone at Oktoberfest, doesn't matter where you're from or how you look. The only things you really have to be careful about is getting excessively drunk (the beer is strong and plentiful), and getting into drunk arguments (which can get nasty when everyone has large, heavy glass steins in reach).


22

Red circle means Prohibition, round signal means law-enforced (as per driving code and rules), upper left to lower right red bar means prohibition to park your vehicle (2 or more minutes and stopped engine supposes your car is parked) and upper left to lower right with a 'mirrored' lower left to upper right red bar means prohibition to park or pulling over ...


16

The Oktoberfest is a strongly German cultural event. It is for this reason that you are likely to be welcome there (rather than otherwise). The Germans are looking to "spread the word" (regarding their culture) to people from other parts of the world. In this context, the fact that you are obviously "different" is a positive rather than a negative. Just go ...


14

Young Indian traveller's perspective here - every year many students (~700 - 1000+) from India's premier graduate and undergraduate colleges go on European student exchange semesters or internships around this time of year. I would say close to 60% of those students visit Oktoberfest, and I have seen Facebook feeds overflowing with Oktoberfest pics. Apart ...


10

http://maps.adac.de/ has this feature. The page appears to be German only, but it shouldn't be too difficult to use. The first input box on the left is your starting point, the one below it your destination. Then click on "Weitere auswählen (0/38)" and check the box next to "Tankstellen & Spritpreise". Next click "Weiter" and or "Route berechnen" and ...


10

To add to the other good answers: I am Bavarian, and in 2007 I attended the Esala Perahera in Kandy. It will be a similar experience when you visit the Oktoberfest. Some people might gaze at you out of curiosity for not looking like the majority. But over all, it is a celebration, and people are there for a good time (be it rooted in religion or not). This ...


7

Of course you're welcome. You don't even need to drink either. It's all pretty mellow and I've never heard of or seen any trouble. Just be aware of the cultural difference that some Germans, even when being what for them is considered relaxed and friendly, are still quite reserved. Some tents seem to be more corporate networking or hardcore drinking in ...


6

This is possible by article 5 paragraph 4(a) of the Schengen Borders Code (Regulation (EC) No 562/2006) third-country nationals who do not fulfil all the conditions laid down in paragraph 1 but hold a residence permit or a re-entry visa issued by one of the Member States or, where required, both documents, shall be authorised to enter the territories of ...


6

According to the Verizon Trip Planer they don't offer LTE roaming to Germany for all devices I checked. You can use that tool to look up coverage and plans based on your devices. Even if this were working, the plans seem more expensive than what you can get in Germany. All networks now provide LTE coverage but you need an unlocked device which works with ...


6

You have to pay a surcharge to use the ICE trains within the Netherlands, you do not need to hold a reservation, an international ticket covers your surcharge. See this page. A good site for all train travel questions, in Europe and the rest of the world, is the site of the Man in Seat Sixty-One, here on the how to make reservations with a rail pass (but ...


4

The Bostalsee and the Losheimer See are indeed nice spots. But you may also consider a trip across the border to Remerschen. There are lakes where swimming is legal and safe. From Saarbrücken it is a 45 minutes drive. More or less the same as if you drive to the Bostalsee or the Losheimer See. Depending on where you live in the Saarland, Remerschen might ...


4

When I was stationed over there in the early 2000's, you could buy a map from Esso that had all their other stations located on the map. If you're looking for a non-tech solution to make sure you can get fuel, this is one option.


4

Here's what you need, according to the European Commission's website for travel to Germany In addition to their own valid travel document (passport or ID card), although not obligatory by law, all minors entering or leaving Germany are advised to carry an authorisation (where possible in the languages of both the home country and the destination ...


3

In my experience, travel insurance usually covers you until the date of your planned return home, or the actual date when you return home, whichever is later. This generally only applies if your delay is caused by something out of your control that is covered by your policy. So, if you fall ill on the last day of your trip and have to be taken to hospital, ...


3

Tourists are absolutely welcome in Munich. The city is doing a lot to get tourists from all over the world to visit (and to bring money with them). Sales people from my company (close to Munich) bring customers from all over to the Oktoberfest every year and they love it.


3

No stopping. (The small arrow points to where you can't stop.)


3

What does this road sign mean? It means you should do at least the theory part of the german driving license before driving around there clueless. Here are the official rules (StVO = Straßenverkehrs-Ordnung): https://www.juris.de/purl/gesetze/_ges/StVO You should know them before even starting the car engine on a parking lot. I would never drive in ...


3

When I traveled to Germany a few years ago (US citizen) I realized that my cell phone plan wouldn't have data service over there, and as such, Google maps would be useless. I looked around for a GPS app that allowed you to pre-load maps, and eventually decided on CoPilot GPS (I have no association with the app, just a satisfied user.) You do need to pay for ...


3

Well, you have nailed it pretty well because Saarland is the smallest non-city state in Germany and there are not many lakes. Bostalsee in 66625 Nohfelden. Very nice lake with several smaller lakes in vicinity. Stausee Losheim in 66679 Losheim am See. River quality has improved so much that bathing and swimming should be no problem, even in the Saar. ...


3

I wanted to report back that I attended the visa processing centre last week to submit my application. As "proof of legal status" I brought my Meldebestätigung für die Anmeldung to show I live here and my latest Entgeltnachweis to show that I'm employed here. The visa staff had no idea what these were and, after I explained things, they seemed mildly ...


2

There is no answer on this question as this highly depends on the hotel you want to stay: So check with the hotel. But this being said: It's not very common to pay cash in advance so expect some surprised questions. Maybe paying with debit or credit card would be an better idea, as you don't have to carry cash with you but don't need to pay in advance.


2

I can answer "What risk is there on the ICE to not getting a seat reservation?" for the Dutch part, as I take this train every work day, without reservation. There is an electronic display above each pair of seats that says on which stretch the seat is reserved, e.g. if it says "Utrecht - Frankfurt" and you sit there when the train is in Utrecht, you are ...


2

You don't state what sort of meditation you want to engage in. I am assuming the temporal/spiritual sort (i.e., non-secular) in this answer... You can try the Staatspark Fürstenlager (roughly "Prince's Lodge). It is 55 km due south of Frankfurt. Train access is possible (Frankfurt Hbf to Bensheim) leaving you with a half-hour walk into the park itself. ...


1

No, you don't need a visa for Iceland, if your whole trip remains within the Schengen area. Quoting the official EU Blue Card Network website, you're entitled to: Free movement within the Schengen area However, like @Greg Hewgill mentioned, if you're transiting through the UK or Northern Ireland, you might need a transit visa because they're not part ...


1

We did essentially this same thing last spring. I used a passport holder that hung around my neck but under my clothes to hold my passport and any travel docs. other than exactly what I needed just then, also my emergency credit card. I never carried much cash at a time, preferring the international VISA debit card I got at my bank before going. The hostels ...


1

According to the information provided in the comments, your plan is to visit Greece, Albania, and Macedonia on a single trip. While a multi-entree type C Schengen visa seems to be sufficient for entry into Albania and Macedonia, note that this is a special case. Macedonia and Albania are independent from the Schengen area, and it is thus their choice whom ...


1

I thought it was quite clear in their terms and conditions. One form of ID, and the easiest for anyone who isn't German or living in Germany, is the debit or credit card that you used for paying the tickets. (They don't actually want to know who you are, they want to make sure that you don't buy cheap tickets and sell them on, and a credit or debit card ...


1

Another option is Bayreuth, especially if you are into Wagner :-)



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