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8

Your boyfriend will have to apply for a new passport at his local German mission in Mexico. The reason being that he is not looking to go back to Germany, and thus does not need a one-off document to get home. Indeed he wants to continue travelling and thus will need a brand new German passport. Once he obtains a new passport he will have to apply for a ...


6

I was in the Ukraine in May traveling on a Western European passport. Upon entry, not a single question was asked. Not even purpose of visit or which regions I would visit. I simply got stamped in and that was that. Based on this experience, I assume that it is not generally enforced and rarely checked. Probably they start asking this kind of things only ...


6

I wanted to add my own experience to the answers here. Israel no longer issues stamps I found this to be true at the main international airports. At land crossings they will still issue you a stamp unless you explicitly tell them not to (and also depends on their mood). However if you are entering via a land crossing, such as Jordan, you will get an exit ...


4

You have a UK residence permit. I assume that it is valid. With a valid residence pemit, you do not need a visa to enter the UK. Among other visa exemptions from TIMATIC, you will find this: Visa required, except for Passengers with an EEA Family Residence Card issued by the United Kingdom. One source for TIMATIC data is ...


4

Update: The official website has now been updated and reads: Important Notice: The Department of Homeland Security has begun the process of implementing changes to the traveler eligibility requirements of the Visa Waiver Program mandated by the Visa Waiver Program Improvement and Terrorist Travel Prevention Act of 2015, as enacted on December 18, 2015. ...


3

Since you are qualified for the Visa Waiver Program, so you don't need any Visa (Transit Visa) for this layover, but you will definitely need an ESTA for your layover and taking connecting flight from US. ESTA is mandatory even for people from countries participating is visa waiver program. Refer this question from Yahoo answer for clarification: Do i need ...


3

You have a problem. According to the page on the Russian Embassy in Ulaanbaatar in order for you to obtain a Russian visa there: To apply for any category of visas except transit, one must have a long-term registration in Mongolia (“Alien registration card” valid for 1 year). There are exceptions in the following 2 paragraphs for various countries ...


2

Yes, it is very common to use two passports too. What you will do for immigration officials is: Depart South Korea using the same passport you entered. This is the passport containing your student visa (but you didn't say which). Transit the US on your German passport. Arrive on your Dominican passport. But note that the airline needs to see both ...


2

The answer above is not 100% correct. I just called US CBP and they said that you must resubmit for an ESTA and change your answer for "have you been denied a visa", which would now be "yes". Keep in mind, visa denial is not necessarily the same as an ineligible visa. Now, it's not likely that your new ESTA will be approved but if it is, then you are cleared ...


2

The general (worldwide) trend is probably to extend VOA but since visa rules are in a constant state of flux buying a visa from a Consulate should provide some reassurance that you won’t be declined boarding due to the withdrawal of a VOA facility. VOAs can be cheaper than visas via Consulates which are easy money, so not promoted as heavily (eg by visa ...


2

It seems that regular visas and visa-on-arrival are more-or-less equivalent in Tanzania. The main difference is that citizens from a handful of (African) countries are not eligible for the visa-on-arrival and that such visas are only available at a limited number of designated port of entries (not at smaller airports or road borders). But for a German ...


2

Yes, she almost certainly needs a visa. The main exception is for people who hold a residence card as “family member of an EU citizen” (in German “Aufenthaltskarte für Familienangehörige eines Unionsbürgers”) but that wouldn't typically be the case of the spouse of a German citizen in Germany. Other German residence permit holders fall under the regular ...


2

Some possible strategies include: Check the figures from national. $800 for 28 days CDW seems excessive, but maybe that's how they are compensating for giving you a deal on driver age. If you have auto-insurance at home, see if they will add worldwide coverage for rental cars to your policy. If they do it will be less than $800. Get separate insurance to ...


2

According to the Australian authority on the matter: You should apply for your BVB no more than three months, and not less than two weeks, before the date on which you want to travel. So the answer seems to be, two weeks to three months, which is rather vague so give yourself at least a month to be safe. Also note that generally these guidelines assume ...


2

Assuming you are visiting the US on the VWP (Visa Waiver Program) and returning from Mexico by land you need only your passport and preferably your I94, which you were given when you entered the US. Even if you somehow don't have that something documenting your entry to the US should do, as you can apply for another. Even without that they will probably let ...


2

The reference number you're referring to, is issued by the Iranian Ministry of Foreign Affairs to visa applicants. It is mandatory to get one prior to being issued a visa, but you do not need one to book a flight, or even to board your flight. The airline generally will not look for it, since they will see in Timatic that you are eligible for a visa on ...


2

Yes. I worked in the United Arab Emirates and traveled to Israel twice. Naturally, I didn't want a stamp in my passport, since I worked and traveled often to Lebanon, Yemen, etc. Simply ask nicely and they'll put a stamp on a slip of paper for you. I never even asked, but you might want to, just in case. Do not lose that paper, as it needs to be ...


1

Germany has been willing to issue multiple passports for such situations. (German wikipedia link)


1

Wiki has a page on National Identification Numbers. It specifically mentions Germany: In Germany, there is no national identification number in the full meaning of the term. So as a German citizen, you'd be putting down Unknown.



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