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15

You will definitely want to visit Weird Stuff, which is an enormous warehouse of all kinds of discarded technology located in Sunnyvale. It's a bit out there, but very worth it. If you're interested in doing any archival research, you might also want to schedule an appointment with Stanford's Silicon Valley Archives.


14

You should definitively go to the Computer History Museum in Mountain View and especially check out the Stackoverflow plaque in the Computer History Museum Wall. See also the Meta SO thread about it.


12

From David Fullerton, one of the staff members: Generally, the answer is "no". We're probably smaller than you think -- only about 30 of us in NY and half of those are sales people who cannot be interrupted or we will run out of money and have to stop sending out so many free t-shirts. We don't really have anyone whose job it is to show people ...


11

As it turns out it is possible during the Open Days, which unfortunately in 2013 had taken place on September 28th and 29th. And as of right now there are no such Open Days published for the year 2014. For details you can probably start with the Practical Information page regarding visiting, which is not likely to change much from 2013 to 2014, whenever ...


11

Yes - CERN has an outreach program which does tours along with other activities. From their Visit CERN page: CERN welcomes the general public to visit and tour its exhibitions, experimental areas and other facilities. The admission is free. The permanent exhibition “Universe of particles” and the Microcosm exhibition can be visited from Monday to ...


11

The main campus of Penn State University has an educational nuclear reactor facility, the Breazeale reactor, that offers tours to the public. As part of the tour, they take you through the reactor room where you can see the Cerenkov radiation from the uranium. The reactor itself is submerged under something like 15 feet of water, which is ample protection ...


11

I have a few suggestions for you: Go to the BlizzCon 2011 in Anaheim, only 60 km away from LA. There you can take a look at Diablo 3 and you could use collect some fancy gifts from Blizzard. Go to the Atomic Testing Museum. I was never there, but a friend of mine really recommends it. And according to the homepage it sounds quite interesting. I don't know ...


10

(Sorry for the late answer) I've spent about 3 months over the course of a few trips (2 months on my first trip), and I had a list of places I wanted to see. Not all of them are 'attractions' or the usual, but nevertheless something as a geek that's been looking at the things going on in Silicon Valley from a far most of my life I wanted to see: Computer ...


9

The capsules from Soyuz - Apollo flight used to be and Apollo 11 command module is at the Smithsonian Air and Space museum. A quick search also gives a list of all remaining Apollo spacecraft and their locations based on that there is only one in Europe in London.


8

There is a computer museum in Paderborn Germany (North Rhine Westphalia), reportedly the largest in Europe, that was formerly the headquarter of Nixdorf Computer Corporation. It's official website is hnf.de.


7

First it seems the name of the piece of art is exactly "Crocodilus Fibonacci". The museum has a page describing the piece of art. It belongs to the museum, so it might still be on display on the permanent collection floors. But I could not find any reference on the page saying it is actually the case. Pictures on Flickr of this crocodile date from 2003 to ...


7

TLDR They won't post public timetables, so find someone at the university to suggest one and turn up, because people are in academica because they love their subject, love talking about their subject even more, and are highly likely to help you out even if its unofficially. /TLDR No University I know of has a 'public listing' for 'normal' lectures (not that ...


7

This probably shouldn't be an answer, but it's going to be too long for a comment, so I'll put it here. Feel free to convert if you really don't like it here. Providing tangible rewards for 'crowdsource' feedback hits two major obstacles which have not yet been solved. Verification. We already have very little way of determining if a review of a ...


7

It is specific to one type of conspiracy, but the UFO Museum in Roswell, New Mexico is interesting. I will warn you though, the museum isn't all that fancy. Much of it looks like a high school science fair. They clearly aren't a big budget operation, but it is worth the cost of admission at least.


7

The Hadron Collider is part of the CERN (European nuclear research center). From a quick googling… There seems to be some "open days" where there are organized visits. Have a look at: http://opendays2013.web.cern.ch/ Other than that, I think you will need at least some contacts and references from professors from universities associated with the CERN. ...


7

If you'd accept a calculation, rather than requiring potentially expensive equipment to measure it, there's a website that does that for you: Calculate the dose received From one of their document pages: Generally, detectors only provide correct readings for some of these particles. To obtain a correct measurement, it is necessary to use a series ...


7

This page provides an excellent overview of radiation types and what you are most liable to encounter. For airline flights gamma-radiation is the most probable type. (Alpha particles are stopped by paper, Beta by thin foil or similar. You can buy commercial instruments that will detect radiation for from about $200 on up. An off the shelf "PIN diode" ...


6

I'm surprised noone mentioned the book Geek Silicon Valley It's been a long while since I read it, and it's 5 years out of date (which is a pretty long time in valley terms), but it has a lot of the sort of thing you're looking for. I agree with other answers, by the way - the Musee Mecanique, the Computer History Museum, and Weird Stuff are all good ...


6

On http://www.cucm.de/blog/13/computer_museen_in_deutschland/ you find a list of German computer museums (sorry, only German). But maybe you can follow the links. For the Haus zur Geschichte der IBM Datenverarbeitung Sindelfingen (not for computer in general, only for IBM) there is an English Flyer. Oldenburg has also an English Website


6

Speaking as someone with similar interests as yourself: 1) Best geek thing to do in Vegas: learn to count cards at blackjack, play poker, or other forms of advantage play. Very few gamblers believe there is anything to learn about gambling, and so it's possible for geeks to learn how to maximize their gambling experience. Poker is the easiest game to become ...


6

Been there! It is a really nice exhibition; but i would have expected a bit more to see. It's not scary at all, more exiting and entertaining in a '1950's amazement' kind of way. You wont see any "death and destruction" there, the worst thing is probably the Declassified U.S. Nuclear Test Film #55. I think the science part falls a bit to short; but it is ...


6

A group of us went to Chile back in 2010, and one of my friends split off from us to visit it for a few days. It's only open one weekend a month, from memory, but he thought it was brilliant, and if I return to Chile I'd be very keen to try and get there. At the time, he had tried written/online contacts, but eventually called them from when we were in an ...


5

As many companies have, there is rarely a possibility to see the inside of a plant, but only to see a kind of exhibition, but stocked only with marketing material made for school tours etc. Currently, nuclear power is the most sensitive and emotional topic in Japan and there are many movements against it. You can actually find a lot of organized tours ...


5

They have a tech museum in San Jose that may be quite savvy, atleast to your tastes. Of course, you should also visit Palo Alto, not just restricted to Stanford University; it is place known for youthful energy and budding entrepreneurship that is characteristic of the Silicon Valley.


5

Field Guide to American Spacecraft is a great resource for this. There are many, many spacecraft in various museums, and quite a few of the test modules and mockups have been restored to better condition than they started, so that they can be display pieces. The spacecraft in Europe are: A Gemini test vehicle at the National Museum of Scotland. Apollo ...


5

The museum for all things space, including just so, so much from Apollo and other missions - is the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Highly recommend. Even just seeing their "rocket garden" is incredible, but all the Apollo stuff, including a GIGANTIC Saturn V rocket you can walk under as it hangs horizontally in a large hanger is amazing. Go to the ...


5

I visited the LHC on this years' open days. It was an experience I was glad I took part in. Some people even flew in for the day just to visit CERN. Such open days are unfortunately rather rare. Underground visits are only permitted when the LHC is on hiatus. When the collider is in operation you can't go down there, because of radiation risks, but more ...


4

There is the Bay Model Visitor Center. It is a huge warehouse with a model of the bay and all water. Although the model is quite old and inaccurate by today's standards, it shows the efforts required to study the water movements prior to computer simulations. It is controversial - I liked it, my colleague didn't. Don't expect much interaction there. ...


4

Universities generally have Open Days for prospective students, where they can meet faculty member, attend sample lectures, learn about research activities going on in the department, talk to the current students. These activities may be limited across universities, as they might have different set of offerings and rules as part of these events. You should ...


3

Definitely on Friday, come as soon as possible. Once the weekend starts and people come from work or school (Friday from 16:00 on), it gets packed very quickly. People start lining up overnight to get the best stuff anyhow. You can assume that once the prices go down, the good things will be gone, too. The visitor numbers have been increasing massively over ...



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