New answers tagged

3

Have you canoed along the rivers there? It provides a different aspect on the countryside. Have you visited any of the vineyards for tastings? Have you explored the goat cheeses produced in the area?


9

If it is a "e-billet" (e-ticket), what you've printed in the station is just a reminder and you can reprint it the same way with your "reference client" (the 6-letter code) and the payment card you used (to identify you). If it is a "classic" ticket ("IATA" in SNCF language), you have to buy a new one. You can look in the confirmation mail you received ...


6

Yes you'll have to pay for your bike spot, but only if your trip includes a TGV segment. The map you're showing is for intercités which is another type of train and does not seem to run the route you want. If you search on the SNCF website with your itinerary you'll see you're allowed a free spot for the bike on the segment from Saint-Malo to Rennes, but ...


7

There are three kind of solutions: Expensive and fast : train (capitainetrain.com), plane (airfrance.com, hop.com) Fast and cheap : sharing a ride (blablacar.fr), plane (volotea.com, easyjet.com, ryanair.com) Slow and cheap : buses (flixbus, megabus, ouibus, isilines, eurolines) => You can use goeuro.com to check prices and durations (that site includes ...


7

At Busbud, a bus search tool I work for, we did a little study on the price of bus vs blablacar ride sharing in France. It's in French, hopefully you can get the gist of it: bus is often cheaper but it's worth checking both options. Here are some of the relevant bus companies that partner with Busbud in France and from France to Spain: Ouibus, Flixbus, ...


6

There are now a couple tools to compare the prices of train/bus/rideshares. Two examples are Comparabus and kelbillet. Trying these for a trip in October, 3 months ahead of time, the bus costs from 35 to 50 euros to Bayonne/Hendaye (in my experience, for such distances the price does not vary too much, even a week in advance), the rideshares are available ...


11

I would definitely check Blablacar.fr. There's always a connection that suits your needs.


3

Bus will be the cheapest way to get down there. You will probably have to change bus at some point as close to Hendaye as possible as there doesn't seem to be a direct bus line to there (AFAIK) from Lille. Check/Google the various bus services. A quick search with http://www.eurolines.fr/fr/ returns a 50euro itinerary from Lille to Biarritz.


3

You don't need an airport transit visa. Article 3(5) of the Schengen Visa code provides that The following categories of persons shall be exempt from the requirement to hold an airport transit visa provided for in paragraphs 1 and 2: (a) holders of a valid uniform visa, national long-stay visa or residence permit issued by a Member State; The ...


2

@Relaxed has mentioned the Illico Samedi discount for TER trains. Here's my experience with it: There is a 40% discount (free ticket for children under 12) available for TER (i.e. regional) trains in the Rhône-Alpes region (thus also to Saint-Paul-de-Varax). The discount is available on all Saturdays or every day between July 6 - August 31. Conditions: ...


2

I had the same question last year when planning a trip to Europe (based in England, but also travel to Denmark and with the possibility of others that didn't work out). I did buy one of the major European atlases similar to the Michelin, as I'm a map guy. But for ease of use and detail, hoped to find something technological to aid me. After a lot of ...


7

I'd say Lille (in Belgium they might call it Rijsel.) You can get there in 39 minutes with the fast trains and if you are lucky you do not need to pay more than 19 Euro, but 25 Euro is more likely. Those fast direct trains run hourly at least, there are also normal (less fast) trains which have no restriction on the number of tickets sold, but might require ...


4

I describe my own experience as I went on the Camino de Santiago in summer 2011. I will focus on Spain and the camino frances, if you want to know something about france, switzerland or germany I will be more than happy to add my experience in these countries. To answer your question: yes it is absolutly realistic. But maybe you need some time. I met ...


6

Based on this and that help page of voyages-sncf.com, to print your ticket, you only need a chip card (however, the help considers all foreign cards as non-chip cards, probably to avoid complaints): Si votre carte ne dispose pas de puce (carte American Express ou carte étrangère), nous vous invitons à retirer vos billets auprès d’un vendeur en gare. ...


2

If there is an overnight train involved, you need to book as you are sure you are going to take that train. Night trains are often 'reserved only' and when they run out of reservations, you are out of the train. For all long distance trains it is better to book early, specially if the tickets come with a seat reservation. Most trains in Europe allow you to ...


3

There are few benefits for buying in advance : You'll most likely get better prices, especially during summer period You'll have a seat confirmed If you don't book in advance, then you'll potentially pay a very expensive price (there is not really last minute discount for trains) and you might have troubles to find a seat for the time you'd like to ...


3

You have many options here. As you said, you could just go along the coast and ask any surfing school, I'm sure they'd offer you what you're looking for. Here are a few options if you want to ease your mind: citysurf offers a discovery session for 55€: every week-end day from april to november; shuttle from Bordeaux; 2 hours sessions; time depending on ...


5

I've been living in Grenoble for a few years, and my girlfriend is native from Lyon, so I know a bit the region. If you plan to take the road you put in the above link, I'm afraid you'll be disappointed by the scenic character of the road :) You may want to go through the Vercors mountain (saint-Gervais->Autrans->Lans-en-Vercors->Engins) or Chartreuse (...


4

This is a terrible idea :) You can't travel on french highways with a 50cc scooter, it's forbidden by law. If you do that, you will likely get arrested by the police and your scooter will be seized. You can decide to avoid the highways, so why not? Well, a scooter's engine can only take so much drive before it overheats. Basically, if you travel non-stop ...


5

Try the maps from ViaMichelin http://www.viamichelin.com/ Michelin has a green line alongside scenic roads. Besides that, ViaMichelin allows you to select motorbike, car or bike (although, be aware that bike calculations cannot exceed 200km)


34

This isn't the definitive answer, as I never traveled there but I can give a couple of tips. I've traveled in a 50cc scooter before (for several days). The 50 cc scooter should be able to climb and do everything you want. It will just do it slower :) Things to take into consideration: You won't be able to make average speeds nowhere near 80Km/h, and very ...


1

Here's some points describing what tourists look like: Wear huge backpacks. Stand on corners with maps on paper or on their phones. Stand on the street with a frown and their head on a swivel. Carry bags with them larger and more bulky that bags residents carry. "overly cautious" carry a "front bag" containing valuables. Wear "hiking clothing" in a city ...


1

It's hard to prove a negative, but in general nothing stops you from getting a Schengen visa while your Type D visa is being processed. Upon receiving the Type D visa your old Schengen visa will be cancelled to avoid an overlap. Note that the consulate might not look too kindly on such a practice, as you will potentially overstay your tourist visa if the ...



Top 50 recent answers are included