Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

Both of you need a Schengen visa, which will allow you to travel to both France and Spain. You should apply to either of those countries, depending on where you will spend the most time. If you plan to stay about the same time in each, you should apply to the country you will enter first. The UK visa is only relevant to the extent that it allows you to ...


2

In Lille, the trip count paradigm is used. According to this : http://www.transpole.fr/fr/pass-pass-et-tarifs/titres-occasionnels.aspx Single trip €1.50 10 trips €12.50 Short trip €0.80 (3 stops max, on subway and light rail only) Day pass €4 2-day pass €7.50 3-day pass €9.50 After 7pm evening pass €2 All fares allow transfers. Single trip and each trip ...


4

I'd go with what LaurentG has written. Declare it, pay the deposit (by credit card! Anything else will result in a for you completely useless CHF refund with according fees if you change it to USD) and get refunded upon leaving. There are flights departing from either secor, the French and the Swiss. Therefore, depending on where your gate lies, you might ...


5

You may use the transit facility of Swiss Customs. This is probably the most easiest way to transit with wine without problems. Alcoholic beverages that exceed the allowances and are destined for transit through Switzerland must be declared upon entry (see also Alcoholic beverages). The same applies for tobacco goods (see also Tobacco goods). A ...


7

The Schengen agreement is entirely unrelated to customs and goods, it's only about the movement of people. The UK isn't in the Schengen area and maintains its own visa policy but as a full member of the EU, it's part of the common market, which means you can import any quantity of alcoholic beverages from other EU countries (for personal use). Conversely, ...


2

Actually the simplest answer to your question is Yes. The airport of Geneva, although situated in Switzerland, is an international airport and has a French section. It can be accessed from France without passing the Swiss customs, through a special road (route douanière). There are car rentals at the French section of the Airport, for exemple Sixt. This ...


3

As mouviciel explained, you can indeed combine stamps to reach the required value. You can do that even with stamps that don't have a value printed on them. They remain valid even if the prices changes and their value is the current price for the relevant service (green stamp = letter in France, red = priority letter in France, blue = EU, purple = rest of ...


10

In France there is no distinction between local and international stamps. All french stamps are created equal (except their value). You can put as many stamps as you want and you can put as much value as you want. You just need to put at least the required value to the destination.


2

If you decide to rent a car, beware that not all rental companies will accept taking a car in Lyon and dropping it off in Geneva (a different country). Those that do will likely charge extra for it (in addition to the motorway surcharge). Normally 12:30 should be plenty of time to catch a train from Lyon. The airport website mentions an 8:38 departure with ...


4

It's certainly doable. If you have a French rental car, you will need to either leave the motorway in Bellegarde-sur-Valserine and go to Ferney-Voltaire using the secondary road network or buy a CHF 40 motorway vignette for Switzerland as the car most likely will not have one. Train is also quite convenient but goes to the Swiss side, the duration of the ...


2

Your friend was correct. The problem is that your list is missing a line When travelling to or returning to the UK from another EU or non-EU listed country your pet needs: a microchip a rabies vaccination (make sure your pet is microchipped first or the vaccination won’t count) a pet passport or official third country veterinary certificate ...


3

Getting to La Roche-Bernard from Nantes is not easy. On this map of the region around La Roche-Bernard you can see that there is two bus lines going there. So you're alternatives are: Get a train to Vannes (1h10 to 2h) and take bus 8 to La Roche-Bernard (1 hour). This bus only runs Mo-Fr for some connections (LMMeJV) and Mo-Sa for others (LMMeJVS), there's ...


2

As other explained, with a regular Schengen visa, you can enter the Schengen area in Geneva (or anywhere else in Switzerland and any other Schengen country). You don't need to go to France first. In fact, thousands of people land in Geneva each year to catch a shuttle to the many French ski resorts so it's an extremely common occurrence there. Additionally, ...


2

The Q&A here is helpful: https://www.gva.ch/en/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-193/ If you arrive into Geneva airport from outside France you cannot enter France directly; you must exit into Switzerland. However, the Q&A states clearly: Can I leave on the Swiss side with a Schengen visa issued by France? Yes, a passenger may exit on the ...


2

This should be okay. It says: The Contracting Party responsible for issuing such a visa shall in principle be that of the main destination. If this cannot be determined, the visa shall in principle be issued by the diplomatic or consular post of the Contracting Party of first entry. As your main destination is Annecy in France, you have the right visa ...


1

The requirements of a non-EU citizen may depend on local country law, but you should assume that only a passport will be accepted. For Germany, I unfortunately must tell you that only a passport is acceptable and that airports and train stations are used extensively for “racial profiling”. That means essentially that police looks for someone looking foreign ...


6

For EU citizens it might not be strictly necessary to carry an ID when traveling around the Schengen area but you have to make several distinctions here. The fact that the police can and does check ID does not mean it's mandatory for everybody to have one on them. Conversely, the fact that there should be no systematic check at the border does not mean that ...


1

By law most EU nations require all people to carry photo ID at all times and present it to police when requested. There's usually a hefty fine for failure to be able to do so. And possibly a trip to a police station for fingerprinting and other means of trying to find out who you are. While it's not common for police to be around, even when you need them, ...


1

I was asked for my passport on the Metz, France train station while leaving for Luxembourg. Note: This was NOT ON the train but simply on the station because I was clearly a foreigner. This was an anomaly, I would believe. I have moved around quite a bit in Europe. Always carry my passport with me, but not for this specific reason, and have never been ...


8

May be you will be interested in this data. It's old by still shows dynamic how easy is getting visa C in the Schengen countries. Portugal and Netherlands looks like the best choises. Data from here: http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/home-affairs/what-we-do/policies/borders-and-visas/visa-policy/docs/overview_of_schengen_visa_statistics_en.pdf Here is also file ...


3

As far as I could see, last year, when I was waiting for a TGV at Lille Europe station, an Eurostar train for Brussels called on the same platform I would board my train later. Doors opened, passengers got off then the train departed. In this part of the station like any other in France, the access is open; the usual Eurostar security checks are only for ...



Top 50 recent answers are included